NUR First Gen Trailblazers

The NUR Collective, created by Sajda Ali (CEO), Lina Cañon (COO), and Bianca Surjawan (CCO), is an exclusive community of 1st generation, ambitious, influential women that embody cultural and social diversity. Their mission is to connect, align, and create a community that builds an equitable world for thriving, empowered first-generation trailblazers. They host a number of events and ways to connect, collaborate, and be inspired. Tune in to hear their stories of struggles as first-generation Americans and the inspiration that drove them to create this abundant network of resources to help others be successful, no matter what the dream may be. These remarkable women are making big waves; don’t miss out on hearing about what they have coming next!

Click to Read Transcript

 Pamela Bardhi 

Welcome, everyone to underdog. I have two very special guests here with me today and Lina Cañon and Sajda Ali. Our mission with underdog is basically to empower you through sharing our stories. So, thank you So, much for watching, and let’s get to it. Want to introduce two very special guests here. Welcome, Sajda. Welcome, Lina. Thank you again So, much today for coming and being a part of this. So, I would love an introduction of each of you and sort of everything, you’re about all the beauty and everything. Tell me, Tell me everything.

 

Lina Cañon 

Let me go first, are you wanna?

 

Sajda Ali 

I’m Sajda Ali. I am a Director at my family company, which is a real estate development firm called Ali Corporation. I am currently doing my MBA with Lina as well at Boston University. And that’s where we met. And I’m also, the CEO and co-founder of The NUR Collective.

 

Lina Cañon 

Yes. And my name is Lina Cañon. I am a first-generation Colombian immigrant, also, First-generation college student and in pursuing my MBA. That’s how our love story started. And I work in philanthropy currently, but have always had like a passion for community engagement, civic engagement, So, I’m always doing something on the side. So, that’s how we started The NUR Collective. And an honourable mention is our other co founder, Bianca, who is not here today.

 

Pamela Bardhi  01:45

So, tell me a little bit about The NUR Collective. because I will say, I went to that launch party. So, my friend Keywa sent me a message and he connected me with Bianca. And he said to me, he’s like, you know what, Pam, I think you’d really be interested because you’re a first-generation immigrant here. And I think, you know, in business, I just see a lot of cross collaboration, I think you should check out this launch party and check out these fabulous ladies. Go if you can, and see, meet them, you know, and see, see what it’s like and see what it’s all about, you know, and for me, I sort of understood it a little bit. And then I got there, and I was like, blown away. Like that event was awesome. The launch event, which was what a month ago.

 

Sajda Ali 

Yeah.

 

Pamela Bardhi 

So, okay, So, I know what it’s all about. I love the energy and the spirit. But definitely, tell me until the others that were sort of watching what is The NUR Collective? What should we expect to see from the nerd collective and sort of everything about it?

 

Sajda Ali 

I mean, I guess I can start with like the history of in our collective So, when Bianca and I went to UMass Amherst together, and when we both graduated, she went to New York and started working in a startup, I went straight to my family company. And because we were both in business, we were struggling to find like a community of people who have the same struggles as us, like, you know how it is with women in real estate, and especially as a woman of color and stuff like that, like it’s a struggle to find a place to fit in and get some guidance and resources to progress. So, for a while, I think me, and Bianca connected a couple years later in New York, and we started talking about making a community because we couldn’t find one for ourselves. So, the idea of The NUR Collective came from the fact that NUR is a verb in Arabic called, that means light. And we were just like, we want to shine a light on this entire generation of initially woman. That’s what it was all about initially, that are going through same struggles as we were. And it was a couple years of just talking about it. And like nothing was happening until I met Lena in September. And she came on board and what October

 

Lina Cañon 

Yeah.

 

Sajda Ali 

Yeah. And then since then, it’s just been rolling.

 

Lina Cañon 

And So, then they meet me, and we all get together and say, you know, we want to bring you on board. Like we really like the energy and the action-oriented personality. And I was like, okay, and we got together. And we started as we were sharing our stories of that commonality of being the first-generation in all of these spaces. There were So, many themes that came up for us, right, So, the theme of being the only one of having working in a structured, regardless of what industry, you’re actually, in an industry that has been set up by generation for generations under them, and us being the first one that didn’t have that generation before us to help us through it. And So, we started thinking, talking about it. And since we found that commonality, we’d set it to make it fully inclusive. We’ve had men that came up to us and said, this is really great. We should we have this for men, like we’re just going to make this a fully gender inclusive, while also, honoring everybody’s identity. I think the thing that makes The NUR Collective really unique is that it is truly a place to bring these intersections together. I mean, the United States is like So, rich and diversity. And we’re all learning like I come from Columbia, but inside of Indian and we’re always like talking about our cultures, our religion, our language, even the NUR you know, that I hadn’t No idea what NUR mean and I’m like, preach it everywhere I go. I’m like, this is the light, you know. And we talk about shining a light on things, but also, making sure that everyone’s light is shining the brightest. Because I do think that sometimes when we talk about identity, we get lost and or put into a box, right? And So, we talk about what is it that is inside of you, that is the light that we can help shine the brightest. And so…

 

Sajda Ali 

It’s also, bringing a bunch of cultures together, right? It’s like learning making it a learning environment where we’re learning, still learning, about each other, and like being comfortable to ask questions than just sitting back and just not even learning anything new, just because you’re too scared.

 

Pamela Bardhi

Yeah.

 

Lina Cañon 

And it’s intergenerational, because, you know, we come from immigrant backgrounds, we see the burden of our parents having a different First-generation experience, our First-generation experience, and then for the generation that’s coming up under us like how can we help them navigate this, and it’s also, cross sector. I think that’s the other thing that we have found that when we thought we were catering this to entrepreneurs, we realize entrepreneurs, not a single handed, you know, sector, it’s everything. It’s the activism, the entrepreneurship, the finance, all of it coming together, to help us just progress faster, you know, and not operating in these sights, like silos of identity or…

 

Sajda Ali 

Creating access for others, you don’t have it yet to write. That’s all it’s all about.

 

Pamela Bardhi 

Absolutely. So, what type of events and different projects are you working on now for the future? Because NUR literally just launched like, a month ago? Like officially? So, what what’s coming next, you know, what should we be excited for? And how can others sort of getting engaged with NUR.

 

Sajda Ali 

A lot of things.

 

Lina Cañon 

Some that we can talk about, some of that are pending. But for sure, we have some events that are coming up. So, we like you mentioned, the launch was So, great, I think that was our moment of validation, where we have all these grand ideas and these things we’re talking about, that we can relate to, or like, let’s just put it out there and see if people show up. And I always tell someone, you know, an event is successful when people show up, and you have no idea who they are. Yeah, and that happened that day, we had people of all ages of all races and all economic status of all sectors just come together in an open, vulnerable way to share their experience, which is you know, for some people, it’s like, they don’t want to talk about their personal experience, the first time they meet, they take some time, but everywhere engaging. So, we’re definitely going to have some events in 2020, where we continue to build that.

 

Sajda Ali 

Yeah, we also, are launching our online community to build committee just for NUR to have people comment to get these resources, give access to each other, help people out, things like that, as well. And I feel there’s a lot that’s going on, there’s some things that we just can’t mention at the moment. But yeah.

 

Lina Cañon 

Another thing that we’re doing sponsoring things. So, we are sponsoring a couple of projects, we’re going to have a blog of just highlighting these experiences, also, the intersection of learning but also, sponsoring other women and their voices to be heard. So, we can’t really say much right now, but it’s in the works. And it’s we’re just So, excited.

 

Pamela Bardhi 

So, I’m going to throw a question at you, which is the question that I was thrown at me when I went to Europe, thought it was super cool. What does First-generation mean to you?

 

Sajda Ali 

First-generation to me means having more opportunities than what my immigrant parents had, they came to this country with maybe like $50 in their pocket work two, three jobs did like 12 hours a day, and then built a massively successful company. And because of that, me and my sisters have amazing opportunities. We don’t have to deal with too many financial problems like we have had been able to thrive because of them.

 

Lina Cañon 

And So, first-generation to me means access. I think that when we came here, I was 10 years old. And I started just absorbing all the resources that were giving to me. And I realized that made me become the point of access, not just for my immediate family, but for my family back home, and, my community, whether they were first gen or not. And So, for me, it’s really opening this door to So, many things that we didn’t even know existed and being that point of knowledge. And then for our other co-founder, Bianca, you know, this is the question that we ask ourselves all the time, what is First-generation mean, for her is being unapologetic, which really resonates with us as well, because it takes a long time to own who you are, and show up as your full self and First-generation for her has meant that.

 

Pamela Bardhi 

Now, as we talk about First-generation and journey, can you share with me sort of some of the struggles that you faced throughout the years, you know, because you just never know, who’s watching what they’re going through, and how to sort of help them guide them through that process, because it can be pretty ugly. I know myself, you know, being First-generation It was like, you know, my family was working all day. So, I didn’t have any guidance to go home and be like, Hey, Mom, what’s this? You know, they’re working, you know, So, it was like, for me, it’s I had to figure everything out. Yeah, from day one, and it was, it was a blessing and a curse at the same time. At the time, you’re kind of like, you know, why do I have to face all of this alone kind of thing. And then, you know, down the line, it sorts of defined who I am that made me everything I am today. So, I’m interested to hear your journey as sort of First-generation and sort of everything you’ve been through personally.

 

Sajda Ali 

I guess for me, like, if we go way back in the day, I was, am still a really big introvert. So, even as a towel, I like barely talked to people and stuff like that, I’d be very close to my mom, my dad was working 24 hours a day, like he was trying to launch a company build a company for his family. So, I would spend a lot of time just sitting close to my family. And because of that, it just kind of made me more ingrained of just hanging out by myself, not really putting myself out there. So, I went to private school as a child. And then when I went to public school for high school, it was a huge struggle. I didn’t know anyone, didn’t know how to talk to anyone. It was a major culture shock, because everyone I knew before was someone I grew up with. So, anyone who was here like, I didn’t know how to fit in with them. So, up until college, it was just a very major struggle – just being alone, trying to figure myself out and things like that. When I went to college, that was the first time I really, really put myself out there in terms of making new friends, doing events, being on boards of like clubs and things like that. But it wasn’t even in college, I think I struggled trying to understand what I wanted to do in life. So, my major in college was social bond political economy, which no one knows what it is, I was major in college people literally thought I just didn’t know the entire time. But it really like helped me understand what society was about, and what struggles really were, and why people did things the way they did, because of what happened over the history that caused it that way. But obviously, my parents were worried about what was going to happen. So, they’re like, why don’t you just, you know, join the family company, see if it works out for you. And so, over the summer between my junior and senior year, I started working with my family company, turned out really liked it. So, I joined full time as soon as I graduated, but there was still that struggle of trying to fit in being the boss’s daughter in the company. So, people just assumed that, like you got a free ride for everything. And it really wasn’t that way. Like I had to start from the bottom up. My Dad, I would honestly say he’s probably going to hate me for saying that. I would say he’s probably the hardest on me out of all my sisters, because I’m going to have to, like take over after him. So, every single thing I do, he has a question, he pushes it. And like, obviously, because we weren’t close when I was growing up, we didn’t have a relationship until much later. So, we had to work on building a relationship as a boss and employee as well as the father and daughter. But that’s why we, like, I really wanted to reach out to a community where I can find people who are going through the same issues as I was because I couldn’t find it with my father. He didn’t know how to do it with me. And my sisters couldn’t relate because they were in different fields.

 

Pamela Bardhi 

Right.

 

Sajda Ali 

They had different experiences. So, yeah, that’s really what the newer collective really came out to be. And that’s kind of like what was the pivoting point for me of finally putting myself out there and I think i shocked I think I’ve mentioned this to you a couple times before people are like I didn’t ever expect you to do what you’re doing today. My mom was just like I think like a thief, anything out the rats like children the rest of your life. Yeah.

 

Lina Cañon 

It’s funny because that collective and sharing these stories has made us see how many struggles we share. And a lot of them that are So, out of our control, like some of them are, you know, systemic struggles that we’re sharing, they look different, but they’re all stemming from the same route of living in a capitalist patriarchal society, right like being the woman that’s like stepping into the company and having all of these like privileges, but at the same time, like struggles.

 

Sajda Ali 

Yeah.

 

Lina Cañon 

I think to Bianca’s word of being unapologetic. I think my biggest struggle was finding that unapologetic and me I think, coming here as an immigrant, I am sure a lot of immigrants face is that assimilation, and the romanticizing of assimilation and then saying, like, a simile into American culture and that is progress. And that is success like get rid of your accent and that is good. Reject your own culture and I see we’re seeing a different movement now of all of us really owning our identity. But when you’re the only one in a space filled with people that all look the same have gone through the same things all have generational wealth, and generational power and your like this one little Latina mean like I can fit in here too. It was a huge struggle for me growing up aside from of course, the like, struggles that we all share of like the system that we live in. But finding that community I think, is one thing that as we continue to struggle, because I think that struggle is not something you’d go through and then it ends. It’s somebody that’s continuous throughout your life. It’s like, whew, I went through it today, but then tomorrow is a whole different, you know, story. I think one thing that has made is really, really appreciate what the collective is doing is finding that solidarity and knowing that you’re not alone. And like even we are all struggling, we really all are in different levels, and in different places. Like, some of us physically, mentally, emotionally, systemically. But at the end of the day, if we all have each other’s back, and we can talk about it and understand each other, like, that’s where progress comes from. And that’s what we have found in each other, but also, in the collective.

 

Pamela Bardhi 

Yeah, that’s amazing. So, you’re basically creating NUR. The NUR collective is basically a platform that you wish had, it’s like you created the place that you want it for yourself. Now, for others. It was really much magnified. Yeah, times 1000 by now and probably a million as we talk like a year from now.

 

Lina Cañon 

Yeah, and the reason why we also, feel So, sure that it will be a million is because we are moving towards like I said, you know, there’s So, much owning your identity like you know, defying all the systems that have separated as they continue to operate  in silos. So, like, I didn’t grow up with any Latina empowerment, like, you’re all be old Latina self. And now I see So, many. And I’m like, this is great. But even in that, there’s no intersection to what does it mean to be with a peer like Sajda and be like, So, do you want to somehow occasionally do you want to, you know, how do I even ask where you’re from? Right? Is that me?

 

Sajda Ali 

And we still have like struggle through it. So, like a lot of talking about each other, and like learning new things about each other. And I think even for me, like, I grew up with people with the same religion, like I only knew Muslims for as long as I was comfortable, even culturally, like you still follow the same cultural norms. Women aren’t supposed to be entrepreneurs, women aren’t supposed to. I mean, like, as much as my parents promoted, most of the society wouldn’t want that. Right. They wouldn’t want you to be outspoken, they want you to earn more than your potential husband, when are you going to get married? When is that going to happen? Like your time is ticking all of that. And that’s all these society pressures are on top of you. And it’s finding, it’s building this community of helping you get through that, really.

 

 

Lina Cañon 

And it’s like, I individually can’t relate to that particular struggle, right? Like, no one’s telling me I have a time clock. But I am also, facing parental pressures of like, well, we came to this country, you’re supposed to be a doctor make us all houses, where’s our houses? That we share this and I think, we are So, polarized and meant to think that our identities are supposed to make us, you know, like operate like this, when really we should be learning about each other in our identity. So, even yesterday, when we’re talking, I was like, how long is Ramadan? Like, you know, tell me more about this. And having I think the other things like that trust and comfort that we are learning community, we’re creating a learning community, and you can get a wrong and you can get a right and it doesn’t say anything about you, except that you want to learn.

 

Sajda Ali 

Yeah, just having that here stating that you’re here to learn more than anything. It doesn’t matter if you get it right, wrong. If you ask the wrong questions or anything like that, or you assume the wrong things. At the end of the day, you want to learn that’s what matters.

 

Lina Cañon 

And even if it offends, like even if it offends, like having that trust the like, you’ll check me until I read it offended and we can sit in that discomfort together, right? And be like, I’m So, sorry, that was So, awkward. And we’re like, yeah, that was really hurtful. And how do we move on and continue? Because we got to keep it moving. So, that’s what we’re here for.

 

Pamela Bardhi 

So, Sajda, tell me, because in your father’s company, it’s a real estate development company, which is very male driven. And this stroke my chords very closely, because I am also, a real estate developer, and I’m in that space of commercial real estate and everything. How has it been for you sort of stepping into that world? Because I feel like as first gen, not only are we breaking the moulds of our own cultures, but this culture too, So, you’re facing it, like, twice, you know, So, breaking into that, like, what’s that sort of…

 

Sajda Ali 

I’m not going to lie. It was really, really hard. In the beginning, when I came into my parents’ company, there was a lot of passive aggressive backlash from the employees and other people that just assumed that I would get like a free ride. Nepotism obviously bothers a lot of people and things like that. But at the end of the day, it was really just persevering, and pushing through and keeping faith that like, “You got this,” this is what you’re going to do. This is my career. This is my company, at the end of the day is my family’s company. And it’s not just what’s going to happen with my future, it’s what’s going to happen to my sister’s future, right? So, it matters. It mattered more to me that I had the responsibility of their futures as well, besides mine, to make this work. So, I mean, construction sites, obviously, like you, you know how it is on construction sites, but you push through like, at some point, you work hard enough that those people start to respect you. And they come to you for your opinion, for your permission, like things like that. And it takes time, right. And I think that’s what I should have learned a long time ago that things don’t happen, like in a snap thing take time. You have to build the relationships and go from there.

 

Pamela Bardhi 

I relate that to that very closely, because coming here, I was five years old when I came from Albania. And you know, I went in and pretty much I moved to Boston then we moved to Chelsea and I remember just being different and feeling different. And like I just didn’t like, like I remember I really didn’t like my hair. Like I would try to straighten it every chance that I could and like try to do away with wherever it was that I came from and try to blend in and fit in. And I remember that was like that up until, like college to be honest, like I really wasn’t comfortable with, like my physical self until around that point in time. And I think that it’s sort of embedded in you and you don’t even really know. It’s like, I don’t you know, I don’t want this part like, why can’t my hair just be straight like everyone else, you know. It’s like, you try to avoid out these pieces of you, you know, So, what’s your experience been like in in that, and sort of, you know, growing up.

 

Lina Cañon 

it’s, it’s wild, because my mom is like, such a strong, like, persevering woman that she like, I never from her got that I should be ashamed of who I am. So, it was like, very proud of who I was, but also, very proud of how I was assimilating and embracing that within myself. It wasn’t into honestly, because I too grew up I went to high school we moved, which is really diverse, and then we move to Westboro when I was like, like a handful, you know, I can count on my hand, how many diverse people were in that school and in my graduating class, and in that success was.

 

Pamela Bardhi 

 Assimilation as we were sort of talking about it Lina. So, what’s your experience been like, in in that realm.

 

Lina Cañon 

So, at first, when we moved here, I saw it as a way to just succeed and kind of survive and the environment that I was in, I was like, I could count in my hand how many people look like me or shared my experience in the town where I lived. And I think one of the biggest things is realizing that it’s not me because my mom was always she loves herself like she, you know, she’s a full Colombian woman that shows up as a full self like, she would show up in heels and full makeup to my like parent teacher conferences, but like mom is such a Colombian thing. And for So, long, I rejected that right? Like, I would be like mom, tone it down, like, you know. And I think when you’re growing up, you don’t know these things until you’re getting older. And it wasn’t till I went to college at Suffolk would that really diverse that I was like, Oh, she showing up by herself? Oh, she’s speaking Spanish out in the street. Like, why have I for So, long been rejecting my own identity and my own culture and who I am, and I should be embracing it. And So, that’s when that shift happened, I started to embrace it, I realized that it’s two things. It’s one questioning, like, who created these rules? And why like, why is it that me not having an accent makes me more acceptable, or, you know. I don’t even know the right word, like more appealing to talk to or more digestible, I guess. And I think that as women too, you know, there’s So, many things in this world that us women are telling us how we should be to be accepted in certain places, and really learning like to question who made that rule up? Like, like, why do I have to shave who says who created that, who you know, and look just at least the questioning of these very small things that make you and then to your point. The other ones like really learning that I love me, you know, like, I love me, and I am learning, and I have to be kind to me too. And, and assimilation makes you rejects. I like assimilation makes you question whether you are worthy, or whether you’re valuable as you are. And I think that that’s something that I’m still learning every day, like, I still go through, you know, as like, I’m only 20. I’m turning 29. And I’m just entering what I think is like adulthood and womanhood as a full and I’m like, how do I embrace this fully in honoring myself and not what people have told me? I should be? So, yeah, then defiance. People like trying to make other people around you more comfortable, just So, that they’re not uncomfortable with how you are about them, they just have to be comfortable with how you are who you are, things like that.

 

Pamela Bardhi 

And being different to like, that’s the struggle, like being different for me, like, for So, long, I tried to conform, and you’re kind of like, I just want to, you know, just do this and just kind of be in the corner, do my own thing, and not really. And then I realized like, you know, everyone’s built to stand out in their own way.

 

Lina Cañon 

Everyone has that light

 

Pamela Bardhi 

Right.

 

Lina Cañon 

 Yeah.

 

Pamela Bardhi 

And it’s like, you can’t prohibit that, you know, in any in any way. And like, So, I just, I love everything these ladies are saying it’s like, as you speak. Praise, because I can almost feel it. It’s crazy because we’re all from different cultures completely. But yet, we share the same struggles growing up, which is absolutely fascinating.

 

Sajda Ali 

But we were talking about the New York Times that you’re bringing these cultures together, because you have the same oppressor. Right.

 

Lina Cañon 

And you made it, you know, I think the other things like the political climate, and the like, being different or foreign or other than, therefore means less than, and that’s one thing that we have truly started to see like, who says, who, you know, somebody who maybe hasn’t exposed themselves to differences and like, why is you know, I think in Colombia in particular, like being blond and blue eyed is like, the thing that everyone achieves, and it’s like, how am I ever going to become blond and blue-eyed. Like, I’m not and I’m beautiful, and I’m talented, and I have a lot to give and I have a light that I want to shine and how do we do that, and how do we do that for you and for you and for me, So, that we’re collectively doing this, it’s So, powerful. And I think that that’s the other thing. There’s So, much power in that, that, you know, the systems that we are like, Oh, no, no, no.  Tone it down, you know. And they, they’re the ones who control that too, which is crazy. Because we, at the end of the day for us to like, live and progress and trying to be our best selves for ourselves in our next generation, we need to truly say, in the power that we have.

 

Pamela Bardhi 

What has been the best piece of advice you’ve ever gotten? And what is your advice to anyone who’s watching? These are powerful words. So, I’d love to I’d love to hear that.

 

Lina Cañon 

So, one of my mentors actually, with, with being who I am, you know, comes imposter syndrome. And I was once applying to something and I was like, going through the all the what ifs? Like, what if this happens, what if this happens, and my mentor was like, there are So, many obstacles working against you already, don’t be your own obstacle. And I was like, and that has stuck with me a lot, every time that I want to do something. And I have that hesitation of like, what if, and I just say, like, I will not be my own obstacle, like, I’m just going to do it. So, that was the best advice I’ve ever gotten, because it’s still relevant, right? You know, it’s So, many years later. And then the one advice that I would give is, I think all of us, because the world is So, big, and technology has So, connected and So, overwhelming, may feel like our voice does not matter, or it’s not as important when put in this, in that scheme, or in in that context. But the reality is that everybody matters, everything that you are doing matters, every action that you create has a ripple effect. And that would be my advice like that hold yourself to this standard of like, every single thing that you do is just as powerful as the person with the platform, the person with the followers, the person with you know, it is all of equal value. And that will really change the way that you do things.

 

Sajda Ali 

I guess my advice I’ve The best advice I’ve gotten was from my parents about the only way you’ll get anywhere is by yourself, regardless of where you come from what you’ve been given, you’re the only one who can get you through your obstacles. You’re the only one that can achieve what you can and you’re your own person. And at the end of the day, regardless of who’s there around you, they may be there today, they may not be there tomorrow, So, you have to depend on yourself. And the advice I would give someone else is I think this is very under underrated. But to just push through, keep that perseverance. Don’t give up. Because at the end of the day, I think everything always works out. Just keep going. That’s about it.

 

Pamela Bardhi 

Thank you, ladies, So, much. So, for everyone who’s watching, can you share how anyone can reach you The NUR collective, different social media website, things like that?

 

Sajda Ali 

Yeah, so, our website for the NUR Collective is thenurcollective.com.

 

Lina Cañon 

NUR

 

Sajda Ali 

But also, our Instagram, our Instagram @entrepre.nur. You’ll find that off the website as well. And then we have our personal Instagram as well I’m @sajdasali – at Gmail as well as Instagram.

 

Lina Cañon 

And I’m @linamaria327. That’s my birthday.

 

Pamela Bardhi 

Yeah. Thank you, ladies So, much for coming and sharing your story today. It was extremely powerful. And I know this conversation will continue and it’ll continue to evolve. So, I’m So, excited for the future. And thank you again.

 

Sajda Ali 

Thank you for having us.

 

Lina Cañon 

You can sign up for our waitlist on our email to stay in touch with all of the events that we have coming.

 

Pamela Bardhi 

Love it. Thank you. Thank you everyone So, much for watching this episode and we’re going to bring you some more amazing episodes to come. Thank you

Tune in to the episode to hear the rest of my incredible interview with The NUR Collective!