Corey Barshaw

Corey Bashaw is a top-performing real estate broker in the South Shore market in Massachusetts, but above all, he is a loving father, son, brother, and friend. Tune in to hear Corey’s remarkable story about how he went from a life of tragedy to a life of triumph. Corey has transformed into a teacher and mentor who is deeply inspired to help others be rid of what blocks them and to discover their true potential. His mantra is “no mud, no lotus,” and lives by the practice that everyone can use their obstacles and struggles to learn, grow, and transform their lives for the better.

Learn more about Corey and his work by visiting https://www.thebashawgroup.com/

Click to Read Transcript

Pamela Bardhi 

Hello, everyone, and welcome to another episode of Underdog. Today we have an awesome guest here with us. Corey Barshaw. Corey Barshaw is a top performing real estate broker in the South Shore market in Massachusetts. But above all, he is a loving father, son, brother and friend, Corey went from a life of tragedy to a life of triumph. Corey has transformed into a teacher and mentor who was deeply inspired to help others be rid of what blocks them and to discover their true potential. His mantra is no mud, no Lotus. Today, we welcome Corey here with us today. Welcome, Corey.

 

Corey Barshaw 

How you doing?

 

Pamela Bardhi 

Great. How are you?

 

Corey Barshaw 

Good.

 

Pamela Bardhi 

Yeah, man. So, tell us all about you. So, you’re sitting in your meditation room right now, chillin’ living life?

 

Corey Barshaw 

Yeah, absolutely. Yeah, just hanging out trying to, I would say navigate this difficult kind of times, and do it in a way that’s comfortable. Hence the meditation. Well, there you go.

 

Pamela Bardhi 

I love it. I love it. So, tell us all about you sort of where you’re at now. And then we can sort of reverse back and we can get into you know how you really got there. So, tell us all about who you are and what you do.

 

Corey Barshaw 

For sure. So, 34 years old, I grew up on the North Shore of Massachusetts. So, in the Port, So, I’m sure a lot of people are familiar with Port. And yeah, I, you know, grew up there. You know, we’ll backtrack. And I’m sure we’ll, you know, catch some of that. But, you know, currently, like I said, I’m 34. I’m a full-time real estate broker with Keller Williams, I have a little team, the Bashaw group, I do about 15 to $20 million in sales a year as an individual agent. And then I’ll also, do some additional stuff with the team that I’m putting into place now. And I live currently in Weymouth, Massachusetts, So, just south of the city. I about six or seven miles along the coast. Yeah. And I’m just full time cranking in real estate. The markets been good. I’ve been for about six years. And since being in, it’s gone, well, you know, I’ve been on an upward trend. And I think I definitely resonate with, you know, the topic and the subject matter of your, of your show, which is now kind of a podcast, but because that is very much. My story was kind of an Underdog Story. So, that’s kind of a little summary of where I’m at now.

 

Pamela Bardhi 

That’s awesome. So, you’ve been in real estate for about like six years. And now you’re just pretty much killing it. You have meditation rooms, fun things happening.

 

Corey Barshaw 

Exactly.

 

Pamela Bardhi 

I love it. So, how’d you get into real estate in the first place?

 

Corey Barshaw 

So, I actually came out of a life coaching job, that was my prior employment, and it had a ceiling, right. And that part of my personality, just didn’t want ceiling didn’t want to boss, loved coaching. But the stress of the clientele that we had kind of got to be a bit too much. And like I said, there was that ceiling. And at the same time, I was watching a good friend of mine in real estate who actually started access, which they’re based out of Dorchester. They do a lot of like gut renovation stuff. And he brings a lot of stuff to market. He’s extremely successful. And I just watched his life, you know, and I was like, wow, like, I feel like I could do that. And I was in the construction trades growing up. So, I framed houses. I was also, a plumber. Not licensed but an apprentice for a few years and I done sheet metal fabrication. So, I had kind of a background in a lot of different elements of construction. And I just thought, wow, I could bring that as well as like this coaching kind of experience in the real estate not only be able to, like kind of help people through that process in a way that’s a little bit more therapeutic. Right?

 

Pamela Bardhi 

Right.

 

Corey Barshaw 

But also, have some real good information into, you know, what goes into the construction of the house and what might come up, you know, prior to actually making a purchase or selling a home So, I just felt like it was a good fit. He lived a life that I thought was worth living. And at that point I had got out coaching. And I jumped in kind of both feet and start setting some, some goals.

 

Pamela Bardhi 

That’s awesome. So, you went into trades, and then you went into life coaching and then real estate. That’s, it’s an interesting path.

 

Corey Barshaw 

So, So, that all grows out of that. There’s no Lotus without mud type stuff, right? Like, that’s the underdog story. I think that, like I said, ties in really well with this theme, which is, as a result of like, what I faced growing up and into my, like, mid 20s that enabled me coming through that enabled me to be in a perfect position to help others through similar situations. And I think, obviously, we can get more into that. But that’s kind of how I landed there, you know?

 

Pamela Bardhi 

Interesting. So, yeah, if you could share that, that’d be that would be awesome. Sort of got to the life coaching prior to the real estate, because I think the journey is So, important, right? You know, your people looking at you now. They’re just like, oh, he’s always been in real estate, you know, that’s just…

 

Corey Barshaw 

Yeah, I’m around people. And they look and they’re saying, “Wow, I can’t imagine that was like your life, like, you just don’t look like you could have lived that, “you know, and that’s good. But I think I’m still working on the insides. Right, which is, like really seeing that for myself. But other people see it. So, that’s, that’s good. That’s a good start. And I am beginning to see it through a lot of like, I actually engaged in a lot of coaching and therapy and really work hard on that stuff. So, it’s nice to start to see that for myself. But where I guess that journey started and why that’s even something I do today. Not that I don’t think everybody should do it. But why I guess I was thrust more into that side of things, like getting help and working through stuff was, you know, my childhood was difficult. You know, I grew up in a home with three brothers and a sister. So, a big home on the North Shore with a working father and a mentally ill mom, and my mom was in and out of psych wards. And So, it’s a really traumatic kind of household situation. And no one was really there to like, watch us, you know, and with that, like trauma came the need to escape, you know. So, at young age, like 10, 11, I started running away from home and I just really didn’t want to, just wasn’t safe inside my own skin, you know, really. The place It was supposed to be kind of a home obviously became a very like, traumatizing place. And So, that, as it does for a lot of people, I feel like, you know, especially nowadays led me to, to drugs, alcohol and drugs, you know, to suppress that. Yeah, So, the drugs and alcohol just kind of spun out of control, you know, as a result of a lot of that trauma in childhood, led me to places I didn’t want to be, and kind of doing things I didn’t want to do on the name of like suppressing negative, or not negative emotions, but emotions in general, I just couldn’t deal. So, that’s kind of the start of that story. And what it led to, was, you know, dropping out of high school, right, like, that was like the first big thing, which led to running around on the streets, you know, at 16 years old, and in and out of employment. And that’s where the trades came into. So, wasn’t all horrible, right? Like, there were times where I could pull it together at a young age, and I’d get a full-time job. And I learned to trade, friends and houses and, you know, at least put some stuff into my, I guess, skill set, but it was always short lived. That led me to extremely destructive drug and alcohol use until age 26. Of which $7 are spent on the streets, you know. Yeah. In and out of rehabs and clinics and, you know, incarcerated at times, like, just all sorts of chaos.

 

Pamela Bardhi 

Oh, my God, you know, I find it fascinating. Thank you for sharing all this. I mean, I know it’s a lot to even just talk about, but it shows that your healing. You’ve healed from and you grow from it, obviously, which is incredible. And I think what happens is, you know, I think as humans we have this void in us, that when like, love is not present, we run to different homes, right? And it’s like everyone that I speak to about their story. It’s always been at a time where, you know, you’re at your lowest point and these things start to, you know, come up. I have a tattoo right here on my shoulder and it’s, it’s Matthew four 1:11. It’s the verse where, you know, Jesus is walking through the woods and the devil pops up and he hadn’t eaten for I think it was like 30 days, something like that was that his most vulnerable. Well, the devil shows up, it’s like I can give you this, and I can give you this, you know, and it’s always, you know, the message of trust always, you know, trusting God always, like he’s got you, you know, even if you’re vulnerable points, but it’s hard at that point, you know, and especially when you’re young, and you know, you’re forced to grow up early. You know what I mean. And I think that had a lot to do with your journey. And I know many people who have been on journeys like yours, and it’s not sort of what I’ve felt, and what they were saying to me. And I just find it fascinating that like, I look at you now and you’re sitting in your meditation room, and like, you kill it. And I’m So, happy and proud of you. And that’s pure proof that you can always overcome no matter where you’ve been what you’ve done, whatever. So, I find that absolutely incredible about us. I salute and respect to you big time there. But you know, my question to you is like, you know, during that time, I mean, that was, So, you said you started running away was like 10 years old until 26. That’s a good like, 16 years of running around getting into things. How did you get past the hump to just finally like, let go, you know, because it was part of you for for So, long to just be like, Alright, you know what, like that I don’t want this anymore. Like what was sort of like the turning point for you?

 

Corey Barshaw 

I would say it got really, it obviously got really bad. And I was coast to coast in the midst of it, too. So, I was in different cities. So, I would hop on Greyhound buses, and I found myself in all different cities. So, I lived in Portland, Oregon, on the streets for three years, Seattle for a year and a half, San Diego for a short time, Phoenix for a short time, and then Boston for about two years. So, I was all over. But I remember I was in Seattle, and it was wintertime. And I think there were So, many worse situations that had happened to me, like really bad kind of situations, just being out in that environment that you would have thought would have sent me into throwing the white flag up and saying, All right, I give up. But it didn’t it was more of an emotional break. I feel like where I finally, I think I just felt So, alone, right? Like, there was a point where I was like, wow, like, there isn’t a person on this earth that actually really wants to talk to me right now. And So, that’s obviously a tough place to be for anybody, you know. And I think I finally just reached out, and the only thing I knew how to do at that point, to even try to create a connection was just reach out to my father. My father was a very tough love sort of guy. But I said, this first time of my life, I went straight for, I guess, straight to the chin, you know, and just kind of said, I need your help, you know, and then flew back,  you got me a plane ticket back and said, you know, yeah. You’re going to kind of go and clean this stuff up. And I had to go, you know, I went into jail, I had to wrap up things, because I was always on the run from stuff. So, I had to face that. And shortly after that, yeah, I entered into a rehab, that kind of changed my whole perspective, they presented a whole different topic, which I didn’t really know about, which was like real kind of recovery, which was like the actual working of the 12 steps, you know, So, that’s where, but I would say rather than, get into that just yet. Really, it was that emotional suffering like that, like, deep hits you in the core, and really motivates you to, to do something different, even if it’s some minor little phone call, you know, that leads to a chain of events.

 

Pamela Bardhi 

That’s amazing. So, you made the call. And pretty much you were just back here, and you got into a program that helped the recovery program and sort of helped you with that. And now would you say like, after, is it that program that sort of inspired you to get into the life coaching?

 

Corey Barshaw 

So, it’s funny, So, actually, this is really perfect for what we’re talking about, because it was its vision, right? Like vision is what we have to have to succeed. And So, I ended up in really a lot of pain in a rehab. And shortly after that, and I had to stay there for a long time, and you’re kind of on lockdown status, and all I had to do was read. And I had these really bad dental problems. I had bad dental problems at the time, like everything hurt. And I was in a lot of pain, just physically. I just been on the street for a long time. So, I went to the dentist, offices are cool by the story. And I’m just broken. I’m praying every day I’m doing things different, right? I’m reading books, I’m praying, I’m like, I have no clue what to do with my life. I’m in rehab. I’m in So, much pain, but like, I’m just going to pray. So, I started praying a little bit and I go to the dentist office and they have to extract a tooth, right? And So, I’m sitting in the waiting room and like just really bad pain, and there’s just like little rusty looking bookshelf. That reminds we have like something from when I was in first grade like this. Just an old bookshelf like all kids’ books on it right? In a dentist’s office. And I’m like, I’m going to go over this thing. I’m just going to close my eyes and read whatever my finger lands on. So, I close my eyes. And I run my finger over the backs of the books, and I stopped and I pulled the book out, and what the hell out of all the books, right, it’s a kid’s books, I was just going to literally read something to distract myself from the pain in the books called creative visualization. And it’s all about asking the universe for something and receiving it right by Shakti Gawain on it’s one of the books that transformed my whole life. Right? mind I pulled us out of a bookshelf full of kids’ books is this book literally might as well be handed to me from the universe. Right?

 

Pamela Bardhi 

Wow.

 

Corey Barshaw 

I started that process. And So, this is the long version of me answering your question.

 

Pamela Bardhi 

Keep going, keep going.

 

Corey Barshaw 

I said, I’m going to practice this book, it said nothing can exist on a physical plane before it first exists on a mental plane. All great architecture was done that way. All the green sky, the planes, everything you see, is the work of some manifestation of the mind. Therefore, nothing can physically change until you first change it within the mind. And I thought, wow, that makes a lot of sense. So, it’s a test, this book if you don’t believe it? Well, I had another book, I was written by this guy, Noah Levine, he was a Buddhist punk rocker guy from LA covered in tattoos. And I’m taught meditation, right? So, I go, Okay, I want to meet this guy in three years and haven’t seen my book. And I want to start my own little meditation group at some point. So, I set that intention. And I swear to God, weird things happen. I ended up in South Boston at a halfway house, the Buddhist meditation group that was associated with him, I wanted to go to but I had to be in my halfway house at a certain time, on certain day. I go on their website turns out, they moved from Arlington to a block from like the halfway house, into the yoga studio. So, all of a sudden, the stars are aligning, I show up to this thing. And the ladies hears me talk and she goes, the lady facilitating this group that was kind of in the shadow of this author, Noah. She’s like, you need to start your own thing. Like you got to reach out to like your community of people. People are struggling like you. So, I was all right, and it fell in line with what my little intention was, like months ago, when I was sitting locked up in that rehab. So, I went to the yoga studio owner, I pitched him on my idea. And I pulled this whole thing from an archive out of Los Angeles. That was a little PDF document of like a little group that never made it. It floundered and never made it. That was from the author. It was like his little personal recovery group, but it never got off the ground. So, I took that. And I started wanting before we knew, I was teaching meditation to people who had lived on the street, and we’ve gone through what I went through, and yeah, and then I ended up meeting them and become friends with them within three months of setting that intention. Yeah, he met me on the sidewalk, a self-boss, you know, going, he came through for a book signing, and somebody said, you got to meet this kid, Corey. He started this group with something from your archive, and he’s like, I got to meet him. So, all of a sudden, we’re hanging out, we ended up eating dinner together, he gives me his cell phone number. And within 10 months, I’m on retreat with them at seven-day Silent Retreat. So, that’s where that started. And that whole experience led to me being able to get employed by a Harvard Business grad, who is coaching hyper affluent clients. And I was essentially a coach that helped people through tough mental challenges as well as addiction challenges. And they all came through a path of creative visualization, essentially.

 

Pamela Bardhi 

Wow. That’s powerful. Man. That’s So, cool. Isn’t it funny how the universe works though?

 

Corey Barshaw 

It is.

 

Pamela Bardhi 

Like you had to put your hand on that one thing that you got it That’s So, awesome. Like the universe does things like that. It’s So, thing when you pick up on it, you know what I mean? That that is So, awesome. And now and then pretty much that’s how you got to the life coaching sense since you just never looked back past that point. So, that dentist office before, that was that in Boston?

 

Corey Barshaw 

The life coaching or the dentist office?

 

Pamela Bardhi 

The Dentist Office.

 

Corey Barshaw 

Oh, yeah, it was in downtown New Bedford

 

Pamela Bardhi 

Downtown. You bet you got to go get that shelf and just be like, Hey, man, let me buy this.

 

Corey Barshaw 

Why do you want this shelf? I just need to buy it. I just need to buy it.

 

Pamela Bardhi 

You should. That’s So, awesome. I find that So, fascinating. And So, So, basically through your books is sort of how you hover, started overcoming you know, I mean, of course is the support Your dad helped you out there, and then the support group, and then it was just like what other things like sort of kept your mental game going.  So, past that, through recovery, and then even just like wanting to go into something like life coaching, because that takes a lot of confidence and courage to do too. Because I feel like as a coach, if you’re not confident in yourself, I just feel it just doesn’t work. Like, I don’t know how you can go to someone, if you’re just like, yeah, I think you can do it. But like, I don’t know.

 

Corey Barshaw 

Conviction comes from practice, and like actually having it happen in your life. I’m sure you can tell people, hey, like, especially like, if a female thinks like, Oh, I can’t make it in this industry, right? Like, yeah, you can. And you can say that with conviction, you can show them with conviction, because you’ve done it. And that’s, that’s what it’s all about. So, coach, really, I still engage like insane coaching. And the coach really is somebody who’s charted the waters I’ve yet to chart right. Like, right now I have a coach, and he’s a trauma informed recovery coach, and I’m working through like deep emotional wounding, but like, I didn’t want to touch emotion. So, I had been in recovery since 2011. But hadn’t realized that I was a rock, I was all about success. And I had manifested, right. But I didn’t get to some of the deeper stuff that I needed to kind of cry my way through almost which I was So, like, close to. So, So, yeah, just having a coach. But the way that happened, even was, was funny, I got inspired. And I had a moment of inspiration, I started to listen to those moments that just kind of say like, you know what, take a trip or do this or, you know, whatever it may be for anybody. It’s all that quick moment where you have an opportunity you can seize, right? And it said, New York City. I had somebody that wanted me to coach them in creative visualization this before I was a coach, right? I said, Hey, can you show me I’m trying to get a like promotion at my job. And I like really just want to know this practice. Somebody told me you can teach me this practice. So, I ended up going in New York. He’s down there on a business trip. So, I got to stay at the New Yorker and just hang out in Time Square and. And from there, I had this moment on a bench in Flatbush, Brooklyn. I went out to Brooklyn; I was listening to music I like to listen to and just kind of vibe in a way. And I was like, I should be a life coach. And I was like, What would? How would I do that? So, I started Googling on my phone. And before you knew what I found, like, these different life coaching friends in New York, and I started calling asking for a job. And then yeah, one kid you got on the phone, and I happen to have a biography up of me on South Boston, yogas website. Nice, big description explain what I’ve done. So, I just pointed him to that. I said, Hey, this is what I’m doing. I have like, 60 people show up every week. And I teach them meditation, like bridging the gap on like, on all these different things, right, like addiction and coming off the street, or, you know, and So, they were like, wow, this is great. Like, would you consider, you know, moving here, and at the time, I had my daughter on the way, and I was like, I can’t move to Manhattan. But one kid got on the phone. And he’s like, hey, my sister’s a Harvard Business grad up in Boston. Can I give her your info? And from there, that’s what started the whole life coaching thing. I ended up in a long, like three month interview process, but I ended up landing the job and yeah. But it all started with that. Like, again, just like taking a leap and following the inspiration, I guess.

 

Pamela Bardhi 

Insane. So, So, meditations really been like your secret weapon?

 

Corey Barshaw 

Yeah, it’s the secret weapon. I think for a lot of people, for sure. And I think more and more people are getting on board with it, but it’s great. Absolutely.

 

Pamela Bardhi 

Have you done anything else in tandem? Like, like, Well, I mean, positive affirmations, I guess, go with meditation, but like anything, like what’s like, what’s your big mantra, I would say.

 

Corey Barshaw 

They change I would say like, I have one right now. But I just got back from an immersion in Sedona. I went out there for like a coaching immersion. So, like, breathe and fall in love is my mantra right now. Right? Like, it’s just like to settle that nervous system down and just realize like life is good, right? Just breathe.

 

Pamela Bardhi 

I love it. I love it. And So, now given everything that you’ve talked about, and everything you mentioned, like what would your oldest self tell your younger self pieces of advice things.

 

Corey Barshaw 

This is probably pretty deep, but Hmm. I’m actually working through a lot of this right now. Because that younger self is that like broken, confused kid. That really doesn’t have guidance. So, the older self right now is like very much doing internal family systems type internal work. So, that self is saying like, dude, you are lovable, you are good enough, you know, that is exactly what the older self is saying to the younger self in this current day, like even today, like before I go on with you, I had a coaching call. And like that stuff was coming up, right, like, but I think that is, is the theme right now. And I think that’s the thing I’m saying last is like, you’re good enough, you know, because it’s kind of a almost like that raw space, almost create some of the success, right? Like that not good enough, almost drives a little bit of that motivation. And now that I’m here, it’s all about healing some of that stuff, too, and realizing like, no matter what, you’re good enough.

 

Pamela Bardhi 

Absolutely. It’s it is a journey. Self-development is like a you learn every single day, right? And you’re always evolving to when you think you know, yourself, and then you’re like, No, you don’t like, because you’re constantly changing, and things are always happening. And this is your past comes into it. It’s just like this whole thing. No, I love that. And now, given everything that you’ve been through, like what would be your biggest piece of advice, in case there’s anybody listening who’s maybe going through it, or know someone going through it, you know, and any piece of advice that you would you would give?

 

Corey Barshaw 

I would say whatever the subject is, whether it’s overcoming adversity in your life, or trauma, or, or just trying to build a career, it’s find a mentor. Or find a tribe of people that are trying to do the same thing you’re trying to do and surround yourself with those people. Right? So, if you have a bunch of people trying to overcome trauma, that’s why we see things like a meeting, right, and we see yoga, and we see all these different things. And that’s a great place to obviously find a tribe. So, my suggestion would be find that tribe, and then learn from the people, I guess, humble enough to learn from the people who come before, they might be able to create a little bit of a shortcut, you know, to that healing or to that growth, or whatever it is you’re looking for.

 

Pamela Bardhi 

Right. Absolutely. And I think I mean, I think that goes back to the whole thing of you’re not alone, right? Everyone, some people feel like they are, you know, when they anybody who’s hit rock bottom knows. It’s like, you’re just in this space of like, and everybody’s had their own version of it, and no one can really say, Okay, I understand exactly what you went through. Because I can’t, for example, I can’t understand how it was for you. But then on my end, too, it’s like, nobody could understand what I went through. But we sympathize right? No, like, you’re not alone, you know, and everyone has their own ways of doing things. I think that’s the beautiful thing about the world. But like you said, find your tribe. Once you find your tribe, they’ll never make you feel alone, right?

 

Corey Barshaw 

That’s right.

 

Pamela Bardhi 

This is So, awesome. I absolutely love it. No, of course, you’re amazing, really. And I mean, to stand up and really talk about this stuff and, and being humble about it, that you’re you know, that you’re going through and you’re still progressing. I think that that’s really, really fascinating and telling of who you are as a person, you know. And like now, I mean, where you’re at now is really incredible. So, tell us about sort of what’s happening in real estate and like, what’s next for you? And those books I feel like you can take on the entire world.

 

Corey Barshaw 

Yeah, So, right now real estate is, you know, the market I think we saw it kind of like it was touching gold a little bit back in March in April. And again, it’s like confronting fears head on, right. Like and being willing to face it and like, remind myself, hey, yeah, it’s slow right now, because I just had six of the best years of my life and, and then all of a sudden, we didn’t know what was going on with the market. So, just like really, focusing on wellness through this time has been So, important to just remind myself, hey, you’re okay, no matter what. But obviously, the success has afforded a lifestyle that’s So, vastly different, you know, I’m able to travel and I’m able to have this beautiful house and like these things that I always dreamed of having that I never thought I would. And that’s amazing. And I’m able to provide that to my six-year-old daughter, Francesca, she gets a great life, you know. And because of this healing process, I get to show up in a way that people didn’t show up for me. So, that’s just currently kind of like that’s like, the whole kind of ball of wax, right? Like I got this beautiful little girl and I’m still on the healing path. And business is now picking up after all the doubt and the fear and we’re navigating what we’re going through now, not only as an individual but as like a community and then yeah, just really starting to experience gratitude. But still, it’s life. Like I’m going through a very difficult situation right now. Like, you know, just like personal stuff. And I think it brings on a new level of grief. Like, I think there’s certain losses I didn’t really experience when I was younger, as a result of like, covering that stuff up. And So, now there’s a lot of like grief from having to work through in adult situations, you know. And So, that, yeah, still working on myself.

 

Pamela Bardhi 

And it’s and it’s a day by day thing. In terms of, So, you’re now south. So, you grew up North Shore, but now you’re selling real estate? South Shore? Yeah, I guess you didn’t like North Shore.

 

Corey Barshaw 

I love the South Shore. I mean, I’m from the North Shore. But as you can imagine the memories there on is, you know. The new I’m fond of my, I guess, goodness, daljit here, right, from my years being here and up there, the Juju’s a little off, you know. The energies off.

 

Pamela Bardhi 

Thank you. That makes sense. That makes complete sense. And So, anything new that’s coming up, like soon for you like any events, any books, any podcasts? anything fun?

 

Corey Barshaw 

Yeah, no. So, like, it’s I just got back for two from two weeks in Sedona I kind of threw everything up in the air and went out there because stuff slowed down a little and was able to, like, go on an immersion hike, and my friends flew out, we all our friendships got stronger as a result. Now, it’s super exciting. And now we’ve been really, like, I just found that tribe, like, really, really found it on a deeper level, which has been awesome. And then from there, you know, going forward, kind of in the, in the next few months, it’s really just like, you know, being with my business building and continue to really structure a team. And, and set goals. What also, what’s manifesting, like, my kind of my spirit is like this idea that I really want to be in coaching. And then I want to start or jump into my own coaching world, right, like, whatever that looks like. And So, I don’t know where that’s going to go, I let things kind of like, be born, I guess.  I know that that’s my intention. And I know the universal kind of put that together for me in time. So, I guess that’s where I’m at. And then I’m starting to dive into me, and my buddy just said, a night where we’re going to do a creative night to, to write, because I want to write a book at some point. Yeah. So, to start that creative process, right, just to get in the habit of the writing, and set some time aside with a friend to really spend time like stepping away from work and all the typical things that can get, you know, kind of repetitive, right, and break into some creative stuff and some short film, potentially, like we’re kind of talking about all types of stuff, but it’s exciting. It’s bringing, like, a whole new like, passion back into my life outside of real estate.

 

Pamela Bardhi 

You know, that’s awesome. There’re no ceilings for you, man. I love it. I love it So, much, and that you’re willing to diversify and kind of try new things and kind of just keep going and push the bar and you’d be like, Alright, well, I tried that. This is cool. But I also, like this, you know, I love that you’re just an entrepreneur by trade, man. I love it. Yeah, it’s So, So, let everyone know sort of where where they can reach you.

 

Corey Barshaw 

So, I have an Instagram which is just my first and last name right coreybarshaw, I’m on LinkedIn under the same name. I’m no longer on Facebook. Took a little hiatus from Facebook, which has been good but yeah, Instagram LinkedIn and you can see me or find me on my website, which is the bashawgroup.com.

 

Pamela Bardhi 

So, that’s awesome. So, if anyone wants to buy any real estate in South Shore. This is your man. Corey, thank you So, So, much for being here today. And for sharing your story. You are an absolute Rockstar

Tune in to the episode to hear the rest of my incredible interview with the one and only Corey Barshaw!