Codie Sanchez

Codie Sanchez is a reformed journalist, turned institutional investor to cannabis investor and advisor, to now Founder at Contrarian Thinking and Cofounder of Unconventional Acquisitions. Together with her team, they help people think critically, and cashflow unconventionally while allocating to what we call “sweaty & boring” small businesses.

She has worked at the intersection of marketing and money, finding contrarian ways to invest. She’s always balanced her profession with non-profit service to empower women, veterans, and Latinos.

She is a board member at The Arcview Group, Magma Partners Venture Fund, Texans for Veterans and a member of the free markets think tank, AEI’s Enterprise Club. She also sits on the policy board of the Marijuana Policy Project. She invests in women-led startups through Plum Alley, WAVE and The Vinetta Project and cannabis companies through Cresco Capital Partners.

She received her degree in PR & Journalism from ASU’s Honors School, MBA from Georgetown University, and PhD from Fundacao Gestulio Vargas. She was awarded the JFK Award for Print Journalism and the Howard Buffett Grant.

Know more about Codie here:

Website: https://www.codiesanchez.com/

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/codiesanchez/

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/codiesanchez/

Twitter: https://twitter.com/codie_sanchez

Medium: https://medium.com/contrarian-thinking

 

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Codie Sanchez Shares Her Inspiring Story of Becoming a Contrarian Thinker & Maximizing Cash Flow

Pamela Bardhi
Hello, everyone, and welcome to another episode of underdog. Today I have an incredible guest here with me today, Codie, how are you?

Codie Sanchez
Life is good, I’m stoked to be here.

Pamela Bardhi
I was so stoked to have you. And you know, it’s just a true honor to have you here today and see another woman in finance and just in business. Just like out there crushing it and inspiring the world to do the same which I adore and love so much. So, Codie, I know you have a hell of a journey that we’re going to talk about today. What inspired you on this journey to where you are today?

Codie Sanchez
You know, I started off as a journalist. So I was covering stories along the US-Mexico border about human trafficking and drug smuggling. And what I quickly realized is there are a lot of other people with last names, Sanchez. But the difference between me and them was that I had a different socio-economic standard. It wasn’t even that I was American, it was that I grew up middle-class ish. And so I wanted to understand this financial language of money and once I did. I wanted to spread that to as many people as possible. So I did that, first by employing a lot of minorities, women, and then I did it by working in a country in Latin America for quite a number of years.

Then we did it in cannabis, by funding a bunch of businesses and pushing back against the stigma around this drug. And now we do it through kind of sharing the things. I’ve learned in finance and for building financial freedom with other people. So the idea is financial freedom leads to personal freedom. Which leads to philosophical freedom. Meaning your ability to think for yourself without having somebody potentially holding it over your head. And that’s what got me here today.

Pamela Bardhi
That’s incredible. You’re such a rock star. So starting off in journalism, I have a lot of questions for you. Another one that I have for you is, what did you want to be when you grew up? What do you want to be?

Codie Sanchez
I always wanted to be in business. At a young age, I had a bookstore, I was like slinging books for my parents that I wasn’t supposed to, you know. The bookstore is located on the front lawn and sells anything that anybody was willing to buy coming through and enslaved my little brother into him, my cousin Caroline. So from a young age, I was always trying to do, I was always trying to do business.

You know, my dad was an entrepreneur, although he probably never called himself that he was the founder. So I was always trying for that exactly, trying to figure out how to play in the realm of business. And I think I always knew that was going to be the road that I took. It was either that or it was writing, because I’m ravenous, always in the library, and love reading books. And so between those two things, I think I’ve kind of maneuvered both of them into life now, which is cool to see and fun to do.

Pamela Bardhi
So totally. That’s why your content is so good journalism. And you and that writing. That’s so awesome. I love that. So what inspired you in the book realm like writing, reading, writing anything in particular, like in your childhood?

Codie Sanchez
I wonder if libraries still do this? I’m sure they do. But I remember every summer there will be a summer reading program in our local library. And they would give you this map and on the map, you would have to read so many books to get to the end. Then I would do maybe like two that summer and so I think it was a game for me at first. And I think they say the way to teach somebody to love reading. Is to start reading anything whatsoever that interests you. Like, have no snobbery about it, pick a cartoon, you know, pick a comic, pick whatever you want. But just read about something that really interests you.

And then the more you read about things that interest. The more you can get up into other subjects as you just become comfortable with reading overall. So I think all I read for probably decades were like science fiction and fantasy books if there was like a dragon on the cover. If there was something like Lord of the Rings, I was in and that’s led to today. Now I read up, you know, most every book about biographies or history or self-help or philosophy or ideas. But it really all came and started with a dragon.

Pamela Bardhi
That’s incredible. It all started with the dragon. Hmm, wow, that’s remarkable. Good. That’s remarkable. I always like to see, where does it come from? Where does it stem from? Like, who’s been a mentor in your life? Would you say?

Codie Sanchez
I think, I probably choose different mentors for different things. Most of my mentors, though, probably have come from books, I mean. I’ve had incredible humans in my life and I kind of talk about being a collector of humans. I’m always trying to curate my network and to spend a lot of time. Bringing people into my network, that I think can benefit me and that I can benefit them. I’m really not passive about my friendships. So you know, as I’ve changed through time, I sort of move through friends that are also wanting to change through time with me. So I think that’s really important that you don’t just stay static in your friendships. And you can keep friends for long periods of time. I certainly have many, but to keep growing.

So my biggest mentors have probably been, you know, the biographies. I read the lessons I learned there. And then over the last, I’d say, probably five years. Two to five years during a couple incredible groups, like we have wanted contrary thinking now. People that used to be my mentors are now in my group, which is super fun. But I have Mike Dillard in there who’s become a dear friend, who’s based here and runs, like, ran one of the longest-standing podcasts out there. And it’s just an absolute machine and how to turn things from the internet into real businesses.

Then I have old mentors, like one of my first bosses. Bob Kendall, who ran a really big business at Deutsche Bank, who I still stay in touch with today. And now he’s on the newsletter. So the newsletter seems to be a way to keep all these mentors in my life. And then I sort of believe you should have mentors, sort of like you have a board of advisors. There’s no human that I think has everything right, myself included. But we pick different people for different aspects. Maybe finances, maybe family, and maybe fitness, whatever the case may be. So I have plenty of those.

Pamela Bardhi
I love that. And so what took you from journalism to contrary and thinking. Because I know and like you’ve been on Wall Street. And you’ve had this like a credible career and I know, you’re super humble. So I’m gonna pick it up because I think it’s so.

Codie Sanchez
Well, like, the advice that I usually give about this is, I remember vividly not wanting to go to a conference. I was on the phone with my mom in a car, I was late to this, like Latinas. Or women and finance conference or something. But I didn’t want to go and I was tired, I had a bunch of other school stuff going on in college. And she was like, just go like, when do you ever regret going? You can leave if you don’t like it. But why don’t you just at least show up and so I did. And at that dinner, I ended up meeting the person who hired me for my first job out of college. Which is Vanguard, where I did an accelerated development program. It’s a big financial institution.

And so the life lesson there just showed up. Because if you go where the game is played, there’s a higher likelihood that you’re going to get to play too. So that advice sort of stuck with me, throughout all of my careers and trying to go to all the conferences, in the segments that I thought were interesting. In trying to surround myself with groups of humans who are playing the game that I want to play. Showing up again and again and again. I remember one job, there was a job I really wanted at State Street and which is another big financial firm. And I was at Goldman at the time and I wanted to leave Goldman and go to the institutional side of the business and I wanted to build this big business for them.

They were like, not interested, you know, I was too young. I basically had no experience in this and so I bother them. They said, no, that I flew out to bother one of the managers in Boston, actually. And he also said no, nicely and then I flew out to San Francisco to bother one of the other managers in San Francisco. Then finally, after, I think I had flown to one of the Oh, Dallas, I met one of them here for a conference. And finally, after I had been like, to these three locations basically been like, just hire me, you’re not going to regret it.

I’m going to be relentless. You know, they were finally like, Okay, I guess we have to give her something or she’s going to keep an eye on us. So I think that the second thing is like, just show up. And then if they don’t come to you, throw your own party. So I did that time and time again, throughout my career. I found very few jobs just by people offering them to me. Usually, it’s me chasing them and beating them down with a stick. I don’t really have any ego about that. It’s worked out. Well, I think for both sides of the equation,

Pamela Bardhi
Amen. I love that, I love that, you knock down those doors to make something happen. Because I feel like a lot of people wait and they’re like, Why is this not happening? And I’m like, you gotta get out there and get it like you got to come true. That’s why I love that you went out there. Not once, but four times before. So, four times, that’s unreal. How did you deal with that rejection? The reason I asked is I know that there’s people listening that deal with rejection all the time. Especially right now as there’s a lot of job transitions with COVID. And like that, you know, a lot of people are having a hard time with that. How did you sort of maneuver with rejections? I know everyone handles it differently.

Codie Sanchez
Yeah, I mean, for me, I’m really divorce usually rejection of myself for a job from rejection of me now. When a business I have that I’m public on fails. I take that pretty hard. Like, I think when you’re an entrepreneur and you build a baby and it’s not working, you know. They don’t show up and they told me they were gonna show up when I built this thing like that. I still struggle with and that I have to do all the normal things, I have to go talk to a bunch of people about it, I have to like walking off the edge of the cliff.

But when it comes to somebody saying no for me for a job. I think the best thing that you can do is try to build up your self-confidence. Your skillset as much as possible because for me, I’m like, Oh, this idiot, he’s totally missing out. I need to convince them, he has no idea that I’m the best thing that’s ever happened to them. Why is he saying no, let’s educate this man and so that’s usually the way, that my brain thinks. And if I really want it, I will just keep going after it until I get it. But I think if you can play that game with yourself, even when you’re seven. There were times that there was another job at Credit Suisse that I really wanted.

That was another big leap for me and they ended up giving it to another girl. And then like six months later, she left or didn’t work out or whatever they call it. Then I told them, no, now it feels extra good. But I think the key is like, can you tell yourself a different story? Instead of the story being they didn’t want me? I got rejected, no, like, it’s really hard to get a job, nobody’s hiring. Instead of that, It’s like, Oh, my gosh, well. There’s a lot of people that need to be educated out there. About why they need me in their company. I’ve always done better about being very direct about who I want to work for. Like, I want to work for this company and I want to work in this space.

And because that’s rare, most people are like, I want a job that makes x. But because I’m pretty targeted, there’s a different feeling that employers get from that. They’re like, Wow, she’s like, I want to work here for you, for this reason, no other reason. And that’s actually really hard for us to turn down. As humans, we have selection bias.

So if I’m the hiring manager and I already work at this company and I have already made that decision. I’ve already plowed a lot of time and my life into it. If you are confirming my decision to be at this company and you were saying, I will work for you specifically. And I want to work at that company, you’re confirming me as a human. So it’s actually a psychological trick that you can play on hiring managers. And it’s very hard to turn down consistently.

Pamela Bardhi
That’s incredible. So anybody who’s listening selection bias, like that is incredible that you’re super targeted. That’s mind blowing. So I just studied NLP, like I did my first round of it last month. Learning all these new neuro linguistic programming and how the mind works. It’s the most fascinating thing in the whole world. And when you said that, I was like, Oh, I bought one from a Whoa. I’ll have to learn about it.

Lots of people are talking about it today. But I haven’t really spent much time in the sector. Oh, man, happy to talk to you about it. Because you would absolutely love what you just mentioned, it’s but it’s like everything is programmed up here. And psychology is just unreal and amazing and that’s such a great tip, though. For anybody who’s out there looking for something and even for clients too I feel like that’s a hack for sales as well. If I’m not mistaken. Yeah, I’m sure you’ve used that. On the sales side.

Codie Sanchez
Yeah, for sure, I mean, you have to believe in what you’re selling. First, I think that’s the easiest tack. And if you don’t believe in it, there’s so many things to sell out there in the world that change. There’s no, I always, you know, when I’m feeling down if I’m ever selling something. Or when I was more of straight sales, as opposed to running my own businesses. I would always go back and watch Glengarry Glen Ross. Because it’s the most depressing movie of all time, in my opinion. It’s just like the sales people like going down the drain of this horrible timeshare company nobody wants to buy. And I always, whenever I watch it, remember, like, you don’t have to stay. Nobody has to stay at their job, at least here in the US.

So like, go change it up, go work for somebody else, go find something that actually lights you up to sell. Because it’s much easier to do when you do that. And then it’s the same thing, then you’re educating people on why they should thank you for bringing this thing into their lives. That’s why I never feel bad about selling the stuff the business that I own now. I’m like, it’s the best. You’re welcome. You know, I should raise the price. But I’m not going to right now. Get in here like the other crowds all here.

Pamela Bardhi
It’s so awesome. Speaking of your business, how did you make that transition from Wall Street to your own business? Because that’s a huge jump and huge shift, especially given golden handcuffs. Which is the reason why a lot of people get held back. Working for these huge companies that give you ridiculous incentives. And then to go out there and do your thing, especially as a young woman is super remarkable.

Codie Sanchez
So it was hard. It took years, I mean, I did a tonne of little side businesses that either didn’t work or that started to work. And then my main company, that piston, told me to shut them down. I mean, for decades, I did this, there’s no part of me that was just brave enough to do this. And to just jump into the golden handcuffs I really had to create. It’s why I obsess over cash flow right now, It’s probably all from my own PTSD. I really had to feel like I had financial freedom. Before I could go start my own thing, I had to feel like I had an fpu fund. Where at any moment like they didn’t like what I was doing. But I was building this other thing I’d be like for you.

I’m out and so I needed to have that safety. It was just a mental block that I had. So when I finally did it, I was making more money in my other stuff than I was in the main business. But that took me years if I had actually instead started 10 years earlier. And made the same decisions that I was making today. I think I would have been even better financially off and I would have been happier and not have to travel as much as I did at the time. Because we almost traveled like consultants for years. But let me say, I don’t think everybody should be an entrepreneur. I don’t try to glamorize it, it’s a miserable existence often. So in my world, I think what everybody should have are multiple income streams. Which does not mean you have to be an entrepreneur.

It can just mean that you have a job you love and something that you’re really good at doing. But you also have an Airbnb or you also have a family unit. Or you also own a percentage of a small business or a few small businesses. That I think there’s no reason why we shouldn’t all have that. Because if employers weren’t so fear-based either they would tell you, we want you to work here because you want to work. You’re not because we have to shackle you with handcuffs from an income perspective. You know, everybody on my team, on the contrary, and thinking they make plenty of money elsewhere, they don’t have to stay with me. And we talk about it all the time.

Are you enjoying it, do you like what you’re doing? Do you want to do something else, I’ll help you figure something else out. Never tried to hold somebody to me with a chain. Because of that, I think they do incredible work. And they’re willing to do it without all the normal butting heads that employers and employees can have.

Pamela Bardhi
I love that. So what inspired this big jump for you, because it is a huge jump, like what really made you pull that trigger and be like, Alright, we’re gonna do that.

Codie Sanchez
I really like to be told what to do, so I think that was part of it. You know, at some point, like, once you get a taste of freedom. You’re hard to employ, I think if you have my personality. So what I really don’t like, about corporate America and finance. In general, there’s an attitude of one, we’ve always done it this way, that’s we’re going to continue. And there’s an attitude of I know better, because I’ve been here longer. There’s an attitude of like, Just shut up and do your work and I experienced that a lot in finance. I was like, first of all, you guys are wrong. Because we used to do it this way, doesn’t mean we should do it today.

And the fact that you have some ego wrapped up in a manner of which we execute business. Tell me that you’re not somebody I want to learn from, you know. When I am wrong on my team, which is all the time the team members will be like Codie, that’s that makes no sense. It just happened. I was just working through a video process for something and one of my employees is like, no, it makes way more sense to send it in this way. Batched and you know, we should have this microprocessor. It was like, Oh my gosh, you’re totally right, I’m sorry, I got in the middle of it, do it that way. And a lot of times in these financial firms, there’s this massive ego about being right.

Let’s be listened to. I’m sure it’s the same in big real estate for you and so I just was over it. And I was over a bunch of people who were good at financial leverage and arbitrage, trying to tell me how to run a business. So I’ve got a little chip on my shoulder. But that being said, I’m glad I worked in it for a number of years. Because I learned so much from the processes, the systems that trade and finance, you get incredible training. I got my MBA paid for free, I made a lot of money at the time. And many of my investors today are people I worked with, worked for who worked for me over the years. So it’s definitely a net benefit.

Pamela Bardhi
That’s incredible, I love what you mentioned about the fpu fund. I think everybody listening should have an fpu fund though I coded it, I think it’s super awesome. It’s super awesome. So in case anything ever happens, because that’s the biggest problem right? Most people in America have one income stream, aka your job, aka when you lose that job you are aka screwed. It’s like, you got to just make sure that you have those different revenue streams coming in someway somehow. And like you don’t have to invest money or anyone who’s listening is like saying Money, money.

You can put sweat equity into things. And you can own a percentage, like a friend of mine who’s an attorney. He’s like, Pam, I own part of a tech company. I was like, dude, that’s sweet. Awesome, I was like, what do you do? Did you invest? What, like, what did you do? He’s like, No, I just do all the legal work. Hello, bartering. Totally, super awesome. Like you don’t have like, it’s not like this genius thing and I love that. And so tell me about your business and the awesome work that you do. Because I know, anybody listening doesn’t tell me all about the trade.

Codie Sanchez
Yeah, well-cut. Her thinking is fun. It’s a newsletter and a community. So the newsletter goes out once a week and the idea is to teach people to think critically and cashflow, unconventionally. And so we try to wake people up with words. I kind of talked about and the way that we do that is through really tactical playbooks. So like, each week, you’ll get something to kind of entertain you. Or push back on the way that you think they’re called my rants. And then there’s a segment that is super tactical, so it’s like how to make $15,000 a month with a vending machine. How to buy land for 10k and cash flow 15 $100 a month on it.

You know how to use mailboxes to grow 120k a year In a pack and ship business. So we take real examples of real humans who have built boring normal businesses. And we teach you how to build those same things or buy those same things. We push back a little bit on the frameworks that I think we were poorly taught in school. So we have a lot of fun with it and what I felt like is. There were so many newsletters that were about ideas. And there weren’t as many that were about, okay, I have an idea.

Now, what do I do with it? How do I take it to the next level? And that’s what we do at contrary thinking and then on the contrary and cash flow. Which is our premium version, we give everybody the exact template. So it’s like 12 times a year, once a month. We will invest in a business, so I’ll buy land. Or I’ll buy a tiny home and I’ll give everybody that’s in our group, the exact tools that we used.

And so over the course of the year, you can kind of follow along and out of the 12 be like, Okay, well. I kind of like the one on Tiny Homes, I didn’t really like the one on laundromats. I’m gonna buy a vending machine or I’m gonna start one of these, I’m gonna have my kid do it. And we all create a portfolio of small bets, as opposed to like you said, the one income stream. So now you could by the end of the year, you could have 12 of them. Or you could pick one of the 12 and double down on it and do a lot, so that was the idea.

Pamela Bardhi
That’s so fun. Oh, man. See, this is the stuff we learned in school. So what inspired you in that realm to work on that specific thing about the different income streams and stuff like that? Just through your experience, in finance?

Codie Sanchez
I think it was I started contrary, last year during the pandemic and I started off writing about theory and ideas. But what I realized was exactly what you were talking about, unless people are financially free. They can take ideas and listen to them, but they can’t really actuate them. So I was like, wow, what would happen if we had a world in which people did not rely on their income stream, in order to live.

And if they had other things that they were doing and the work that they did in the world. Because one they thought it should exist? Two, they were uniquely skilled at it and three, they really loved it. I think our world will look a lot different and so we want to create a tonne of humans who have that freedom. So that they can work and build and do the things that really speak to them. That they were meant to do and not worry about how am I going to pay my next bill. Because I think a lot of times people try to turn their hobbies. Or that idea inside of their head to their monetary income source.

And maybe that doesn’t make sense. Like maybe what you really want to do is build this crazy startup and it’s going to mean that for two or three years, you have $0 in income. But at the end of it, like the world needed this thing and you were able to do it. Because you had a couple of different income streams that allowed you to build it. Without you having to take massive venture capital or borrow from your mom, your dad, or grandma or whatever.

Pamela Bardhi
I love that kind of touches on Maslow’s hierarchy of needs, where if you’re in survival mode. You cannot do anything else, you’re just worried about making sure you have a roof over your head and food on the table. And that’s exactly what you’re getting at, which I think is so incredible, so incredible. Because if you can empower people to be financially free, you can empower them much higher, as you were talking earlier in this interview. Which I think is truly the key to success, which I adore, Oh, my God. And you said you started this during the pandemic, too, that’s even more insane.

Codie Sanchez
Well, it’s easier because I don’t have to travel around so much. So we have to stay in one spot and that made it really easy to create. And I think for a lot of people, the pandemic also realized your priorities. It was like mortality was staring you right in the face and you asked yourself. What do I really want to do? Is it just that I want to add more zeros to my network? Or is it that I want to create something where if I don’t make it, there’ll be something left after me. And so those two things really pushed me forward and I consider it kind of a blessing.

Codie’s Biggest Challenges And Biggest Successes

Pamela Bardhi
That’s incredible, so technically, you’re a startup entrepreneur in this realm. So I’m sure all the entrepreneurs listening, you know, what were some of the biggest challenges in the beginning? And then what were some of your biggest successes?

Codie Sanchez
Well, the biggest challenge, I’m not very tech-enabled. So one of the biggest challenges was, if I build this media business, what’s the right way to do it. And through what platform, so I started with one platform that was kind of a catch-all solution, but then I realized, you know. If you build something on somebody else’s platform, then they own your audience and you really don’t. And so one of the big challenges even today is we switched to our own website and we optimized our back end. So it actually works really well for paid members. But that’s been a huge learning journey for me. Because I’ve been in finance for a long time.

So I’m not a smart tech nerd that knows how to enable all of that. And the other trend and I actually know nothing about that. I’ve never had a paid newsletter before, I’ve done a billion deals in my life. But I’ve never done this and then the second thing was probably just getting over the fear of getting out there. Like I’m pretty public now and there are a lot of people, wherever you go in public. That are used to seeing you one way and when you move to be seen Another way. I’m sure it’s similar for you real estate to them having a podcast and being more public. They’re like, No, no, stay in your lane. This is the pathway. Now, this is the Codie we know and you just have to expect that and then break against it and it’s hard to do.

And it’ll happen continuously in your career. Like when I first started coming out people were like Oh. Are you gonna write about cannabis? I was like, No, cannabis is one asset class that I have a large private equity fund in. But it’s not what I want to write about. So then I write about all these other things. I’m like, Oh, Okay, perfect. Now you only write about laundromats, I’m like, No, that’s also not what I want to do. And so you have to stay true to who you are and not let other people boss you around. People will constantly be trying to typically the most from your closest circle. So that was the biggest challenge for me. The same like I’m sorry, I love you and I don’t care what you think.

Pamela Bardhi
Oh, I can resonate so heavily with everything that you just said, that’s for sure. Entrepreneurship is like a mental game, I swear, it’s continuous and it never stops. And when it comes from your closest, you’re just like, like you said, I love you. But I don’t care what you think moving forward, boom actually takes a while. It sure does. Oh, man, and what have been some of your biggest success stories, like your most favorite moments and doing what you do?

Codie Sanchez
I mean, when you get yourself out there publicly. The people that you start to be able to engage with are incredibly incredible. So much different from the monetary success you look for in a salary. This just opens up your aperture, it’s like a camera or like your lens is really, really tiny. And then it opens and you see that there’s all these other things that it reveals. So I think the biggest wins have been well, one, you know. Now have a seven-figure newsletter that’s cruzan inside of a year and a half, which is awesome. And I’ve employed a bunch of people in that regard, which is really cool. We have actually gotten, there’s been now more than the 20 newsletters, our readers have told us have been spurred off of ours.

We’ve had more than 30 people buy or start a business, we’ve had tonnes of people tell us and count up their financial freedom. So just had one yesterday that told me that they bought. One of the businesses that we talked about and now they have $14,000 in monthly passive income from it. So getting those stories all the time of hearing people actuate these ideas, makes you feel we all want to feel important. And we all want to feel like we’re leaving an impact rather than a legacy. At the end of the day. I almost think that’s what we want more than anything. And so those are the biggest wins for me, by far. Anytime we can make people money and where we can make them sort of do the thing they were supposed to be doing. That’s a huge one.

Pamela Bardhi
You’re amazing. I love that. That’s so incredible. Oh, man, what a legacy. And you’ve just started, like, you’re literally a year and a half and then like, look at this.

Codie Sanchez
It feels like 10 but yes, you’re right, only a year and a half.

Pamela Bardhi
You got this though? How amazing. And so what would be some of your biggest tips, you would say in diversifying revenue streams. Or just regular business tips in general, whatever, whatever you feel called?

Codie Sanchez
I think well, first of all, the income stream thing is huge. Like, you guys can sign up for contrarianthinking.com, it’s free. And on there, I would just say like read through, there’s probably 50 or 60 or 70 emails on there. Read through them and pick one and actually start taking some action. I really like people to try to take one tiny step forward on these ideas every single day. Because if you do that for 30 days, you’re going to be hard-pressed to not have another income stream coming at you even if it’s small, but that’s okay small compounds. So that would be what I would say the biggest thing and then the second thing is like don’t be afraid to be public. Because there’s probably people out there looking for somebody just like you.

And you know, I have lots of friends that don’t even do it with their face. Like I was just having a chat with this guy, Mr. five to eight, who is an investor on tik tok. He has millions of followers, he’s doing incredibly and you will never see a space on a Tik Tok is completely blank. And so you don’t have to have it tied to your face your personality. But I do think you’ll be really amazed at the doors that open. When you start becoming a creator, as opposed to just becoming a consumer. I do think that’s the way the world is going. That creators in all the respective industries that we have, we’ll be able to pick their opportunities. We’ll be able to pick their income flaws and consumers won’t have that same opportunity.

Pamela Bardhi
I love that. Oh man, Codie and now question for you, which is one of my favorite questions ever. What would your oldest self tell your younger self, based on what you know now?

Codie Sanchez
They would probably say like, take the jump sooner, like bet on yourself. You don’t need a bunch of middle-aged white guys in order to do something, you know, you can love them, you know. I definitely do have a great dad, a great, a great fiance. But you don’t really need to have somebody else to be successful in a role or venture.

And man, it’s taken me a long time to realize that so just go do it. Go start it now. The risk-return ratio for when you start a business early, you have so much less Less to lose. You don’t have kids yet probably, you don’t have a big mortgage payment, you haven’t had lifestyle creep happen. So start now, because it just gets harder to start later doesn’t mean it’s not possible. I got plenty of people who are incredibly successful and just started at 40 5060. But it’s easier when you’re younger. That’s amazing then.

Pamela Bardhi
So now you talked a little bit about the contrary, what are you up to now, like in the next six to 12 months? What’s going on in your world?

Codie Sanchez
Yeah, we’re working to create. So I think what we’re gonna do is we’re gonna create a rolling fund to invest in the small and medium boring businesses that I talked about. It’s a segment of the market that usually, only the really wealthy can invest in through private equity funds. And we want to democratize that. So just like Now, a lot of people can invest in real estate. I think in 10-20 to 30 years, a lot of people will be investing in. Or wish they had invested in small businesses. It’s a little bit more complex, but it has a much higher ROI. When done right, return on income, you make more money from it when done right. And so we’re going to start that fun.

So if you guys want to participate and you’re accredited. You can go to contrarian thinking code, when we announce it, you’ll see it there. And I think what we’re going to do is try to get more and more ways. Whether it’s education or events or more community groups for people to engage with other humans who are interested in the same thing. The most fascinating thing for me is learning from a new human every day. If I can a different subject matter and investing with interesting humans and interesting ideas. Because I know I don’t want to stay in one thing for 10 years, I get bored. But if I invest, my money doesn’t get bored and it keeps working for me. So that’s the goal.

Pamela Bardhi
You are amazing. Thank you so so so much for being here today. You’re incredible. I cannot wait. I’m gonna sign up for that newsletter. Because I see it on Instagram. And I’m like, Yes, like, yes. Like, she’s so awesome. Thank you so much and everyone listening. Please check her out. Where can we find you, go to work and find you?

Codie Sanchez
Well, I’m on Instagram, like you mentioned, Codie Sanchez. And I think the best place is contrarianthinking.com. Sign up for the newsletter and I’m super active there Instagram and Twitter.

Pamela Bardhi
I love it. Thank you again so much for being here today.

Tune in to the episode to hear the rest of my incredible interview with the amazing Codie Sanchez.