Misty Lynch

Named as one of the top 100 Financial Advisors in the US by Investopedia in 2020, Misty Lynch is a Certified Financial Plannerâ„¢ and Certified Life Coach. Misty is passionate in her commitment to helping her clients handle their finances and lives with confidence. Misty hosts the weekly podcast Demystifying Money. She is also a resource for various media outlets including The New York Times, Cosmopolitan, CNBC, CNN, Investopedia, Real Simple, and Student Loan Hero. In this episode, she shared how her 6th-grade competition introduced her to the stock market through becoming a Certified Financial Coach. Misty put emphasis on the value of investing not only in the stock market but on to one’s self.

Connect with Misty:

Website:https://beckbode.com/

Website: https://mistylynch.com/

Twitter: https://twitter.com/mistylynchcfp/

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/mistylynch/

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/mistylynchcfp/

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/mistylynchcfp/

 

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Misty Lynch Remarkable Modern Money Secrets of Going From Scarcity Mindset to Abundance

Pamela Bardhi
Hello, everyone, and welcome to another episode of underdog. Today I have an amazing guest Misty, how are you?

Misty Lynch
I’m good. Thank you so much for having me.

Pamela Bardhi
Thank you so much for being here. I’m so pumped to talk about you today. And all the awesomeness that you bring to the world. Such beautiful energy and I just can’t wait to hear about your journey, where you’ve been, and where you’re going.

Misty Lynch
Awesome. Thank you so much. So it’s exciting, I was so happy to talk with you, so it’s nice to be on your show. I love speaking with you about your journey. So this is fun.

Pamela Bardhi
So excited. And of course, I start out with the most loaded question known to man, which is what inspired you on your journey to where you are today?

Misty Lynch
I think that I was kind of inspired to learn about money, really early. We had money when I was growing up until I was about nine or 10. Then my father’s business kind of didn’t talk about money a lot like for the first part of my life that I can remember. We just kind of had it, we were able to do things, we had boats and cars and Toys and Fun stuff that you had in the 80s. So when the economy changed, we had to move, we got rid of everything, we sold our house. All of the possessions and we moved into a different town. I just remember things felt so different.

And then after that money came up all the time. It was just always something we were thinking about. A lot of scarcity on my mom’s part of my father’s business owner. So he was more entrepreneurial, always thinking of new ideas. But not necessarily like putting them into action. Or he would have periods of time where you’d be like reinventing a business for months. And it takes a long time sometimes to shift gears with what you’re doing. So I remember being in sixth grade and being in a stock market competition. I’m in like, I remember just learning that people use their money to invest in other people’s businesses and make money doing that and it blew my mind. This seemed to me like a sixth-grader.

Like the key to figuring things out would be like, how do I get my hands on some money? And how do I start to invest in it? Because this whole paycheck is living day by day. Like being completely actually no paycheck when you’re self-employed, no unemployment, it was terrifying. So I kind of became very conscious of money.

Started working as soon as I could. You know, waiting tables and I kind of really loved making money, it felt really fun. And so I think I’ve always kind of taken to it for whatever reason. But then I think about when I decided on my career. I really just wanted to be the person that I wished my parents had run into in the early 80s. Who were like, Alright, this is cool, but we got to figure some of this stuff. Out for like the future you if things maybe take a turn for the worst. How are we going to make sure that these kids are okay?

Pamela Bardhi
I love that. Let’s dissect your story a little bit. But I love that you were so inspired. It’s in sixth grade, though.

Misty Lynch
Yeah. It’s funny, I chose Coca-Cola and I laugh about it now. Because I thought fruitopia was going to be like the beverage of the century. It was like crazy juice, whatever. And it didn’t end up winning me the competition. But now I know Warren Buffett added Coca-Cola. It’s one of the biggest holdings in Berkshire Hathaway. So I was like a long-term investor before I even knew that, so I was onto something back then it just took a couple. More decades for it to really come about. Which was much longer than the week-long competition we had.

Pamela Bardhi
That’s so awesome. Now question, what did you want to be when you grew up? As a kid?

Misty Lynch
I wanted to be a lawyer because I knew that they made money. Oh, you know, I figured that was the thing to do, I couldn’t be a doctor. Because that stuff just freaks me out. Like the side of blood needles, none of that for me. So I was like, oh, lawyer then can do that. And then I went to school for a political science major at UConn and thought about it. But then I really just wanted to work, I really didn’t want to pursue loss. It just wasn’t like a passion of mine. I really kind of enjoyed money and investing and things like that a little bit more. So initially, I’d Yeah, I just wanted a job that I was like, whoo, huge paycheck, that’s also not for me.

Pamela Bardhi
That’s so interesting. So we have a lot of parallels in terms of growing up. You did mention that your parents had everything and then they lost. I was always used to not having anything so what you mentioned something about the scarcity mindset? Your mom had? And that’s something that I’ve dealt with in my own life and still that family members like that. What I always say to people is success is really built on your thoughts right up here. And are manifestations of the things that you say. Words are spells, right? There’s a whole spirituality piece to this growing up. What was the mindset around that scarcity and how did you break that?

Misty Lynch
Yeah, so I saw it and granted my different generations of women like my grandmother never worked. My mother didn’t really work. While we were little she didn’t have to. So she went to high school, married, and started her family and that was really it. I don’t think she ever intended to go to work. And so when everything was taken away, it was scary. It’s like the worst, your brain is always thinking that. That’s going to happen and then when it does, it’s very hard to then be like, Okay, well, what could I do. And she did get a job, she did work, like, she was the one that actually kept food on the table for a lot of times. It wasn’t jobs that were amazing, high-paying jobs, it was hard work in, like nursing homes.

Wherever you could get a job with a high school diploma and two kids. So that was really tough and I just saw how stressed he was. But I also had the side in my brain from my dad, who was just like, you want to create money, you start a business. You find a product or a service or something. And that’s what you go out and do. He never thought about getting a job or a nine to five or anything like that. It was just impossible. He’s a complete rebel, could not have a boss. He just wasn’t suited for corporate America. And he wanted complete control over his time. However, that doesn’t make a lot of money. Unless you’re actually putting stuff out there.

So I kinda had this understanding for why my mom was always upset. But also I saw it, but I didn’t absorb it, where I felt that would be my future. I was just always trying to think, what could we do differently? How could we make this work? And I think that’s when I saw the investing part as like, oh, other people do things differently. This isn’t everybody’s experience and I was young. It kind of got me on the path where I started to lean into it. By the time I was in high school, I was reading books about investing. I was trying to figure this stuff out. Because I was curious and really just kind of what led me to ultimately do what I do now.

Pamela Bardhi
That’s incredible. In my experience with my family, it was always you have to work hard. If you’re not working hard, it was the hustle mentality, the toxic. So, hustle is also like, if you’re not working hard, if you’re not working 16 hours a day, money doesn’t grow on trees and all these things. And then you grow up and you’re like, this is so not correct.

Misty Lynch
I wish I could save it like I saw the opposite. And the fact that he’s 75 today and his business is still open because he chooses it to be open. That’s the side of when I got a job in corporate America, they were everybody else would be so proud. Other parents would die to have me as their kid. I am gonna start like a magnet on my 401k all these things. What are you doing? You have to ask for vacation days. Like, that’s bullshit. And I’m like, No, that’s normal.

Pamela Bardhi
Oh, my goodness. That’s hilarious. Well, because for me, I was supposed to be a nine to five. That was my trajectory and I had this crazy moment in college. And then I realized that Hell no, I’m not working for anybody and my parents were like, Well, what do you mean? Like them for security? We don’t want you to go through what we went through. Because then their mentality owning a business like they have the old school mentality of the business. So they’re, like, so tied to that, so breaking that money mindset, I think, is the hardest.

Misty Lynch
Yeah. It’s one of the most fun parts of my job. And I think it’s ignored by most traditional financial advisors and money managers. Typically, it’s Give me your money. I know everything, you don’t know what to do with it. I’ll handle it from here and it’s like a black hole of where your money’s actually going. First of all, I want my clients to kind of get why they’re doing this. Be okay with it, I think it’s only like 24% of women actually invest any money in the stock market at all. And we’re actually pretty good at it when we do because we get the idea of like. Maybe it’s not instant gratification. But a lot of us like getting educated, getting high-paying jobs, and understanding the way businesses operate.

And so you can understand that money you’re putting into a business now the returns may end up being down the road. Somewhere if this company continues to grow. So I think it’s kind of sad that a lot of people are just like, well, I don’t want to invest, because it’s scary. I don’t know anything about it, you’re gonna take my money and run. That’s just kind of a bad, like rap that the industry has. But it’s something new. So immediately, your brain is gonna be like, no danger. Don’t do it. It’s like actually part of your brain. Like, that’s what rich people do. That’s what smart people invest in. Our brains kind of compete with that, because they do get that like, it’s a smart thing to do. But it’s also like, too scary, too risky.

Pamela Bardhi
Right. And that was insane. Because you’re also a life coach and your certified planner, financial planner. So those are two words that are really tough to break into people’s heads. Just like attorneys are. It’s like, the perception and all of that. So that’s super interesting, so back to your sixth grade investing. Which is mind-blowing to me that you’re learning less stuff. I wish I knew what I knew now, like back then.

Misty Lynch
I don’t know if they think that that sunk in as much as it did. And I’m sure everybody in the class probably thought it was like a fun project. We got to like reading the newspaper. You never know what school is gonna click. So it’s interesting. Yeah, that was it for me, though.

Pamela Bardhi
So cool and then you’re studying it in high school? And then after that just went to college and you were focused on the financial world? Then after that, I got into corporate America.

Misty Lynch
Yeah. So when I first got out of college in 2002, there weren’t a lot of jobs. There weren’t a lot of places hiring and so I did everything from substitute teacher. I was waiting tables and bartending wherever we could. And then I ended up going to a class for an insurance license. Because I lived in Connecticut and they had a lot of insurance companies. And I was like, Alright, well, I can do that. So I went to the class and I remember a woman being like, who do you work for? I don’t work for anybody. What are you doing here? This is boring, this is painful. Like, my boss is forcing me to be here.

And so a woman that she ended up like introducing me to her. Her management and I got a job there. So my first job was in insurance and in sales. Then I got some licenses for investment, which was fantastic. However, it was a rough start to try to go into insurance sales and investing when you did not have any family members to go sell to. Or a list of 100 clients or social media wasn’t even like that big of a thing. Who’s your natural market? I didn’t have one, I’m going to be on my parents’ couch for a while and just grind my way through it. People asking to talk to my boss felt like I was someone’s assistant or their wife.

I’m actually the person. It’s actually me, who’s here to talk to you. So we got audited by, you know, the home office and I remember sitting there with the auditor being like, do you like your job? And she was like, Yeah, I do, I get to travel, it’s pretty independent, I make good money. I ended up then looking into becoming an auditor and I did, I went to work for a company as an auditor. Traveled, met with a lot of advisors, reviewed client files, did compliance work. Which kind of taught me a different side of the industry, follow the rules. Take care of your clients or someone like me is going to find you. And so then eventually, I decided to go back.

Because it was a great job just wasn’t everything I wanted. I see all these people out there doing it. And I’m smarter than that, like, I know, I could do this, would have done things a little differently. Or I would the clients that they’re complaining about, I would love to have, like, they sound awesome to me. So I kind of shifted gears after spending a decade doing something that was good. It just wasn’t exactly like when you mentioned manifestation. I had to go through a little bit more pain, to like, take a risk and actually get where I wanted to go.

Pamela Bardhi
What was that transition, like shifting there?

Misty Lynch
It was interesting. Because a lot of people you know, when you make any adjustments or shifts. A lot of times people are gonna ask why you’re doing that. So a lot of times, like taking risks and making changes when things are good, just doesn’t make sense to a lot of people. And the people that love us the most might be the least reluctant to want to see us change. Because they kind of like us the way we are. They want to keep us safe, they want to protect us at the time when I told my husband, like, Hey, this is kind of what I want to do. We have babies and I think that he just was like, Well, if you think you can do it, you just do it.

And he said I don’t think that there’s anything that you’ve said you wanted to do that you haven’t done. Well, that’s true. So your brain will look for proof of things, but it was like I wanted to buy a house by the time I was 30. I wanted a son and daughter. I was not sure how I made that happen. But I think In my head, I might have had something to do with it. You know, I wanted a dog, I wanted all these things that I kind of, they felt real to me before they actually existed. So it was the same with work, I think that there are clients out there that are waiting for me. And I just have to get there.

Pamela Bardhi
Sounds like you have a magic manifestation method in your mind, Misty. So I think that’s your next thing. Magic.

Misty Lynch
I think you’re right. When you talk about mindset, though, because a lot of times, like, if you have the scarcity mindset. Or you’re stuck things aren’t just gonna happen. Because you’re not looking for them. You’re looking for reasons why you shouldn’t do these things. And so all the reasons why it doesn’t make sense are going to start to appear.

Pamela Bardhi
Exactly. So how did you manifest that? Because when things are going good and you still make that change? First off, how do you realize that you want something more? Because this happened to me in my transition. The transition that I’ve been going through into public speaking, coaching, all these different things. It’s like this voice ringing inside your head that you’re supposed to do something else. And you’re like, Are you kidding me? I am fine, I am doing great. Why? So it’s just interesting to hear how that sort of came to you and how you manifested it?

Misty Lynch
Yeah. So I think I was happy and I kind of created a new job description for what. I felt like I should be doing it for the company and I gave it to my boss at the time and they were like, what is this? And I’m like, well, this is what I’m actually doing. So this is what I think my job should be. Because I was starting to do more PR for the company. I was starting to do more speaking and things like that. And I’m like, this is actually going really well. But I’m obviously paid here to do X and they were like. Doing this, but we’re not good. Like, no, that’s not how things work.

So that was a little frustrating, where I was like, Okay. Well, I really started to think about what I love to do. And I really loved working with some journalists and reporters and putting together webinars. Speaking to people about money and then I got to the point where people are like, how can I work with you. And I had to be like, Well, you can’t, like we could do a financial plan. But then you need to go to another advisor to actually implement it or I can offer you this one product here. So it kind of was like I focused on the things that I really enjoyed.

And then it got to the point where like, that voice in your head just got super loud. These people are now wanting to work with you and you’re saying, I don’t have the capacity to do that. When the capacity to do that is just right over here, just have to make that jump. And so it kind of was like that internal dialogue that you have in your head. Eventually just got too hard to kind of ignore it.

So ended up being a couple like leaving audit and going into financial planning and corporate work was a better move. But then it still felt a little bit like Goldilocks, like not quite it. And that’s like with you. Like sometimes you just keep evolving. Even the things that are so good that I was so grateful for I still might want more and that’s okay. And most people feel like that’s not okay. It really is.

Pamela Bardhi
Totally, I’m telling you. And it’s just so interesting how it always comes about. I’m sure when you heard her response to you, you were like. My job description is far more than what you’re paying me though. I’m sure that’s a chord and all of that. So do you have a method of like, did you write these things down? Like, what did you do? Because there might be somebody listening right now, who’s in the same exact space as you and is trying to figure out how to take this next move. How do I make this happen?

Misty Lynch
Yeah. So along with doing the investing in the financial planning. I got the life coaching certification, so I really wanted to get really good at asking the right questions. And drawing, getting people, even if I was just creating workbooks and stuff for them to sit there. Really think so and so I created a coaching program. Each month I would talk about a different topic. And we’ve only been doing this for two months. But it’s been going really great because I have my current clients all in it. So they have access to me once a week if they need it or not. They can dial in there to ask questions. But then I wanted something for other people who maybe are really just starting to figure this stuff out. Or maybe they’re feeling like I’m overwhelmed.

I’m stressed and I’m not happy or I did all the stuff that I was supposed to do. And I still feel bad and a lot of times its not just money. But money kind of has this underlying space and everything we do. So I opened the coaching program, this month, we’re talking about time management. Because there’s a lot of people that are like, I’d love to write that book someday I’d love to do this stuff. I just have no time and it’s like procrastination and overwhelms. Like, that’s gonna keep you exactly where you are forever. And it really was me like when I was going through this myself. It was like doing a lot, I started a blog just so once a week I wrote about, I was accountable to myself 100%.

Many people would be like, why are you doing this? Like, does anybody read it? And I was like I don’t know, I didn’t even know how to check analytics or whatever. I’m just gonna do this and then it was just really kind of starting to set goals for myself. Back into how they would get there and it was like really just holding myself accountable. It’s a lot of journaling, a lot of reading, a lot of thinking, which is not pleasant. But it’s so necessary when you want to make changes. And so that’s what the coaching program does. It’s just like, spend a little bit of time thinking about what you actually want yourself and don’t feel guilty about it.

Pamela Bardhi
Love that. And you transition from the golden handcuffs into your own business. Yeah. Which is so awesome and I know there’s people definitely listening that are in the same boat right now. Oh, either change or they have made a change or just startup entrepreneurs just trying to get off the ground. Because financial planning is a very difficult industry. And so I mean, I was coaching because it’s oversaturated. You know, it takes time to build clients. That’s a long-term sales process. I mean, there’s all these things real estate first. How did you sort of breakthrough that and start building your book of business to where you are?

Misty Lynch
So one of the best things that I think, I did use social media and I read a lot of sales books and stuff like that. And I know if you look at all of those, like, sales, you know, Zig Ziglar and all these books. These people in the 50s 60s 70s, if they had social media, they’d be all over it. They didn’t even have the access to strangers. People that are not in your neighborhood or your family or your network where we do. So while I thought that my being different, only 14% of cfps are female. That’s not a lot and at first, I was like, oh, that means no one’s gonna wants to talk to me. Instead, I was like, well, that could help me stand out a little bit.

That makes me a little bit different. What if there’re women out there who don’t want to talk to you. Like, maybe they want to talk about saving money for fertility or things like that. They might just feel like, I don’t like nobody’s going to ask me those questions. You know, they might want to talk to a woman about wanting to put their kids in college. Because they feel like they should. So I felt like there was a huge amount of people, women are making a lot of money too. And they’re getting more of the high-paying jobs. They’re starting businesses, they’re outpacing men when it comes to graduating college.

So I was like. What if I could just use certain things like blogging, social media, and trying to connect with people. Like in networking groups that we have in the Boston area and beyond. See if those people are out there and they’re like, waiting for me. That really helped. It really helped. Because people are all of a sudden, like, what are you doing? I see you everywhere and it’s like I’m just using what’s available to me. And trying to make sure that I can make sure people know what I do. Because that’s the most important part of coaching and anything. People just need to know what you do and how they can help the poor.

Pamela Bardhi
Totally. So with financial I mean, I don’t even know if you’re allowed to say this. Because I know that there are certain rules and regulations against financial advice that you can give. Yeah, what would be some of your biggest tips, whether it be on the financial side or the life coaching side? Startup entrepreneur who’s listening right now or just entrepreneur in general or anyone, anyone out there?

Misty Lynch
I think one of the best things to do for people is to invest. And it’s not just investing in the stock market, which is important. You know, we take our money, and a lot of times, we either just feel like just getting rid of it. Or if we don’t spend it now someone’s gonna take it away. A bill is gonna show up, a car is gonna break down, something’s gonna go wrong and it inevitably always did. Because we were always on the lookout for that. But I think one of the best things that I do with my money is invested. I invest in myself all the time and I feel like if I don’t, nobody else is going to do it. And so sometimes that means getting different certifications, signing up for webinars. I’ve hired coaches, I’ve worked with people myself.

Because I feel like we always, you know, I work with, like nutrition and training, I could do it. But if I invest in this, I can maybe do it faster, maybe learn something that I don’t know. And so I do value that and I think a lot of times, it feels bad to invest in yourself. Or even if it’s saving your money for your own retirement or your own investments. Versus spending it on your family or something else. Like you have to kind of weigh that out. Do matter as much and no one else is really going to be looking out for you as much. So I think it’s important to feel okay with investing.

And if you are working somewhere or you’re self-employed. You can set up ways to invest your money automatically. Self-employed people can save a tonne on taxes if they set up the right types of accounts and then, they can help their employees out. They can help themselves become better employees. And also like, take advantage of those benefits. Those are things my father as a self-employed person in the 80s had no idea about.

Pamela Bardhi
Hmm.

Misty Lynch
No idea. And so one of the reasons I do what I do is because like self-employed people have no HR department. There’s nobody saying like, okay, we’ll just put 10% in this or 5% allocated out this way. And you’ll be actually looking at it now 10 years later. So they just start, like, investing in the business most of the time, which is good. But I think it’s good to always balance that with investing your money and also investing in your brain.

What Would Misty Older Self Tell Her Younger Self

Pamela Bardhi
Amen. And that brings me to my next question to you. What did your older self tell your younger self, based on what you know now?

Misty Lynch
You know this is what I love when I have financial planning clients that are like 30 or 20. Because I feel like I can just time travel back and be like, okay. So like one of the best things that I would have told myself to do earlier. And I was pretty good at this, but not great, I kind of set up the things and invested the money. But I think what I would have told myself to do was to really, really define what I wanted. I think for most of my 20s I just didn’t know, I wanted to get out of my parents’ house, I wanted to get the degree, I liked what I studied. But I didn’t really think about it that much. I mean, most people, probably 18 years old, don’t really know what you want to do.

If I could have gone back into college like this is what I would have loved to learn. So I think that maybe I would have wanted to spend a little bit. More time thinking and the last time kind of reacting trying to keep up with my friends. I have 100 purses that I don’t even care about, I don’t know why I bought them, I just felt like I was doing the right thing all the time. And so I think if I was even just slightly more, I probably could have had like another like $500,000 in the bank by now. But you live to learn, but I think yeah, I think it’s really important.

I wish I knew some of these techniques because it’s really hard to examine your thoughts. Most people don’t and it wasn’t something I ever even considered. Because there was a lot of things that I just believed in. I don’t believe it anymore, because they were just my mom’s opinions or my dad’s opinions. Or other people said or did and so I think that even just taking a little minute to question. Like, Okay, this guy said this and now I’m thinking about all of these things. And now like, I might have, he said that. How do I choose to think about this and move forward.

Pamela Bardhi
So right through those mindsets to that thought, it took me a long time to break away from my family’s mindset of you know, money scares. You have to work hard, you gotta work all the time, you got to know this whole idea of abundance was like this weird of this to me. Do you mean?

Misty Lynch
No, and I think a lot of times, I overspend. And when I started writing the blog, it was like, I stopped shopping for an entire year. Because I was just buying things on Amazon when I was up late with the baby. And I didn’t even know it was coming in the mail the next day. I was doing it just because it felt good to like, click and buy something, but I wasn’t even thinking about it.

And so I think mindfulness can be really impactful. When you want to change some behaviors that maybe aren’t that great. But for a long time, I just would buy things. Because if I traveled for work and I was bored, I would go shopping, cuz I felt like I deserved it. You and I were very, very sad. Why am I doing this? And it’s like, actually, I’m lonely and I don’t like this job very much. Instead, I was like, let’s not deal with that.

Pamela Bardhi
Yeah. It’s interesting. How we all have our coping mechanisms, like good say, with the way that we deal with things. I’m a way of like, ah, let’s go out. Let’s go, let’s go have some fun. For me. It’s like things like Nutella and gelato and sweets and deserves it?

Misty Lynch
Yeah. No, like, being by myself in this room is annoying and hard. Instead of thinking about, okay, where do I actually want to go and kind of planning out. I probably would have left my job years ago, you know, but instead, I was like, go have a drink and buy some makeup.

Pamela Bardhi
Hey, it’s all good.

Misty Lynch
I forgive the younger me for knowing what the younger me knew at the time and doing the best she could.

Pamela Bardhi
So awesome. If you’re up to so much amazing stuff. I mean, I know you have your own podcast, too, which is awesome. It was so much fun and so great. And your business is thriving, which I love, love, love. What’s up in your world and like the next six to 12 months, what’s happening?

Misty Lynch
So just recently Investopedia, so that I was one of the top 100 financial advisors in the country. Which was amazing and completely shocking and surprising. So I’ve been doing a little bit more press, a little bit more work with different publications. The Boston Globe likes different things where I could partner up and start to talk a little bit. More about my thoughts around money because they’re a little bit different. But I think people are really accepting that and maybe they’re ready for a change when it comes to how they feel about their money. And what they want to do with their life post pandemics, so that was exciting.

So some have that and then also. Yeah, kind of ramping up the coaching program and hoping to find more people. Who may just want to be more mindful and thoughtful about their money. And maybe they have huge dreams and big goals and they don’t know who to tell. So I want them to tell me that I want to be the cheerleader. But I’ll make sure that they got all the things under control.

They understand business structures, they understand how to set things up the right way. So they can have explosive growth and be completely prepared for it. Because it’s crazy. When the money does start coming in, it can feel absolutely overwhelming and wild. So I would love to set the foundation for those people to help them out.

Pamela Bardhi
That’s so cool. And I love that you’re a woman doing all this because like you said earlier. I truly believe the riches are in the niches. So you’re in a very niche market. 14% of women are certified, planners. And then, of course, you have life coaching, so you go like both of them. But both worlds were just so awesome. So I just think what you’re doing there and your focus is really incredible. I know there’s a tonne of women out there, I think the pandemic shook a lot of people upside down. Now I think a lot of people are re-evaluating what matters. What are their purpose and a lot of people are shifting gears, even if they do have amazing jobs? It’s Yep, It’s like, what’s my purpose? That’s kind of a game right now.

Misty Lynch
Yeah. And a lot of people are thinking, well, if I don’t do it now then when. Like, look what happened and so, I’d love to be able to balance the technical financial planning end of it. With the goals that they have, that can be huge and completely overwhelming to them. But it sounds okay to me. So trying to balance that and help them out. Because it can feel a little bit like, well, I shouldn’t do this, this is wrong. That’s immediately what your brain is going to go to. And I think that we need to kind of push past that discomfort to actually create value in the world and we need it.

Pamela Bardhi
Misty, You’re so awesome. Now you’ve got to let everyone know where to find you and your amazingness.

Misty Lynch
Sure you can find everything from podcasts, blogs, or coaching. Or investment and all of that is on my website at mistylynch.com. So you can follow me at Misty Lynch CFP on like everywhere. I think Twitter, Instagram, Peloton when I got on there, I just pretty much kept the same handle. That’s one of the benefits of having a unique name. So you’re not, you are divine.

Pamela Bardhi
You’re so wonderful. Misty, thank you so much for being here today, I appreciate you. I love the work you’re doing and the light you’re bringing to the world. So keep shining, girl.

Tune in to the episode to hear the rest of my incredible interview with the amazing Misty Lynch.