Brandon Gil

Can a Professional Athlete become a Multimillion-Dollar Serial Entrepreneur? Whether you believe it or not, Brandon Gil has just done it.

Brandon is well-known as a professional athlete. This experience has developed him into a passionate individual with a distinct work ethic. It has also taught him how to be a conscious leader, teammate, and listener. This in turn became the stepping stone for Brandon to be the Founding President of Gil Ventures LLC. Gil Ventures is a holding company for private and public companies that use innovation to enhance the human condition through AI software, hemp, and other emerging concepts. It has been featured in publications such as Yahoo Finance and Business Insider.

In this episode, Brandon shared where it all started and how from being a Professional Athlete, he has managed to build his empire.

At such a young age, Brandon was well aware of Sports since his parents were lifetime athletes. Along with knowing what “sports” is, his character was also built alongside it. This has impacted greatly on his education which eventually lead him to land a 4-year Division I baseball scholarship at the University of Arkansas at Little Rock.

After returning to Miami, Brandon had a short corporate stint with Fortune 500 companies. From that experience, he has realized his aspirations and decided to hyperfocus on growing startups. After a couple of years of successfully helping startups scale, Brandon opened Gil Ventures.

Since then, Gil Marketing has generated millions of dollars in revenue. Aside from being featured in several publications, Brandon also had the opportunity to feature as a speaker and panelist for mastermind events in the cannabis, marketing, and tech industries.

The highlights of the podcast include:

– the transition from baseball into his career

– how he started to build his empire

– biggest pieces of advice for anyone who is interested state in starting their own business

Don’t miss this inspiring Underdog story of Brandon Gil where he bares everything and shared all he got. Prepare to be empowered and reach new levels of success.

Listen to the conversation with Brandon Gil here:

Apple iTunes: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/underdog/id1534385651

Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/6FbSDu0aNtuxAEiderUAfB

Website: https://theunderdogshow.com/

Connect with Brandon here:

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/brandon-gil-801535bb/

Email: brandonjakegil@gmail.com

Click To Read The Transcript

Brandon Gil Shares His Unique Journey of Becoming a Serial Entrepreneur

Pamela Bardhi
Hello, everyone, and welcome to another episode of underdog. Today I have an incredible guest here with me. They’re Renaissance men. Brendan Gill, how are you, my friend?

Brandon Gil
Hey, I’m doing really well. Thanks so much, man. How about yourself?

Pamela Bardhi
Life is beautiful. Oh, man. It’s such an honor to have you here today. Thank you so much for being here today. I know you’ve got an extensive background in marketing, cannabis industry, NF T’s like music labels, and all sorts of awesomeness. So I’m so excited to talk about you and your story today. But the first thing that is always asked and this is my favorite question, but it’s also the most bloated one. What inspired you on your journey to where you are today?

Brandon Gil
That’s a really good question. I think what inspired me the most was just trying to really understand the goals that I had. And I guess like what I really wanted out of life. Just kind of introspection, who I am is just kind of like through that. And like my intuition is really what’s guided me down the path that I’ve gone down. I really attribute that mostly, you know, so just like Perma understanding and what I want.

Pamela Bardhi
That’s incredible. And so I read that you had a background in athletics, your family?

Brandon Gil
Yeah, yeah, that’s correct. I grew up with a family that was extremely competitive. Everybody played sports up through college and my brother actually played professional baseball internationally. So we were all pretty competitive growing up. My brother and I were always going at it and something whether it be on the field. Or some game you would make up in the house too. We would always have fun like that.

Pamela Bardhi
I can totally feel your pain. So my dad was a professional basketball player in Albania. He played for the international team. I was in high school playing basketball at a game and he’s like, why aren’t you scoring? Like 20 points per game? I’m like that I’m also not like six, six. So the competitiveness, I could feel that pressure.

Brandon Gil
I don’t think the hype really came out. And my side is my info. Yeah, that’s too funny. Yeah, that’s really cool. That’s really interesting, just be like an international professional player, like kind of tone, that’s like just such an incredible journey. I’m sure everything has some unique experiences.

Pamela Bardhi
For sure. But back, when you said, competitiveness, I just thought of my dad. And I remember him watching one of my games and then I didn’t, I didn’t turn games. Because I was like, I had no score, like two points and he’s been really poor. Scoring another zero. So they’re just thinking growing up with athletes, that’s for sure. That’s incredible.

Brandon Gil
I play baseball in Arkansas. So I went over there and that’s where I went and went to school for college. And that was just a completely, you know, life-changing thing. Just to kind of get that different perspective in the way that people were and where they lived, and just different backgrounds of people and stuff. So it was, it was really cool. That was an interesting experience for myself.

Pamela Bardhi
That’s incredible. So what did you want to be and you grew up.

Brandon Gil
I definitely like to be a baseball player, to be a professional athlete, to do something along the lines of music. But like, aside from that, it’s kind of like my mom was a teacher. She’s always been like an educator, she did that for decades. That was something that also kind of called to me, I also like being an attorney for a little bit. So I had an internship and it wasn’t really my thing. I’ve kind of wanted to be a few different things. I think growing up I don’t think I want to be a lot of things. That’s what it is. Yeah, I wanted to do a lot of things.

Pamela Bardhi
That was like me, too. I had so many different dreams and so many different things. You know, in my world, it was pretty much like, all right, Pam, I want to be on stage, I want to be singing, dancing. However, I can’t sing, I want to be a doctor now. I saw blood on needles I would pass out so it’s a wild journey that life takes us on.

Brandon Gil
So funny. Yeah, absolutely, I don’t think anybody Yeah, like those things in your head are great. I feel like you really learn the reality of life, what goes into them you experience. Just like not at all what I thought it was, you know, just not in my interest.

Pamela Bardhi
So totally, totally. And you have such an interesting path. So you had played in Arkansas was that during your college years.

Brandon Gil
I played in Arkansas through all my four years in college, I mean, I was born and raised in Miami. So I played in Miami growing up, you know like, the down here Florida is a powerhouse for sports like really your power your top three states. Yeah, California I got Texas, you know, you got Florida in there as well too. So now just really was a competitive ball down here and had some good teams. You had some great teammates and great memories and stuff like that. But yeah, everything was just you know, throughout Florida just until I got into college. A little bit more of a shell shock to me once I’d gotten over there a little culture shock.

Pamela Bardhi
Yeah, for sure. So who influenced you the most growing up? I know, you mentioned your brother, you guys were kind of always at it. But was there a person or people in particular that really influenced you growing up?

Brandon Gil
Yeah, I mean, for sure. My mom, my dad, and my brother are my top three people. Just because they were the people that I was around the most in my life. I was fortunate I didn’t really have a mentor. I’ve never had a mentor really even like this day and I didn’t really need to. Because I thankfully had good guidance and had like, my parents and I have my brother. So I was able to really look at them, like my parents and their work ethic.

I mean, just like the competitive aspects and like always trying to be better than my brother being the older brother. God forbid if you ever beat me in a one-on-one and basketball was still to this day still is not happening. Who’s what I attribute most of who I am to was like my parents and my brother.

Pamela Bardhi
That’s incredible. Well walk me through your college experience and shifting from professional baseball. Basically, into owning all these businesses, you’re basically like a shark, which is incredible. So walk me through that transition and how that sort of happened. That is incredible.

Brandon Gil
You know, I think it was just more than anything after. I mean, obviously gearing up my whole life to have a collegiate career. Then ultimately what I was thinking at one point in a professional baseball career, yeah, obviously. Things change and you just kind of need to look at them. So now I want to kind of stay down the sports path. And possibly be a coach or something like that, which is fine. That’s a path that many people take. Just because this is an interest that they are. So invested into and that they really appreciate. Enjoy a lifetime’s worth of it, so there was just kind of that. But I know, that wasn’t really what I wanted to do.

There was more that I could do, I would be limited to if I was to stay in sports and into coaching that industry. So yeah, I think at that point, I just kind of went on a journey to try a little bit of everything. You know, I think like, I’ve just changed my path so many different times. I think my end goal was relatively the same, I really figured out entrepreneurship. But yeah, I mean, I went into professional sales, I worked for a professional sales consulting firm. Like my first job and then like after that and so I did door-to-door sales for companies like at&t, for example, and like door to door business solutions.

And nobody likes at&t guys. So I learned a lot doing door-to-door sales, getting rejected talking to people, things like that. I talked to people and they don’t want to talk to you, so yeah, there’s like a lot of that. That was only for a few months before I got to like a good corporate opportunity at a Fortune 500 company. I was a discovery network down here in Florida, which does like Discovery Channel, Animal Planet, TLC, etc. And I like media programming, advertising, programming, etc. But really at that point, like about three months. Things started happening throughout my corporate experience. Being limited in capabilities and feeling like I was making so much of an impact.

In just the way that I had to manage relationships with my management and my leadership. It just kind of made me think, Okay, well, I don’t think that. If I were to go down this path for so many years that I would ultimately get to where I felt like, I’d be most fulfilled. That’s kind of like introducing me. I actually had a coworker and she was hearing me, we were talking, we had a friend group. We were all just kind of like talking stuff. And she was like, Man, I want to introduce you to my buddies after hearing her. Hear me talk about entrepreneurship and do my own thing. She’s they have a marketing agency that they’re looking to start up, etc, etc.

So yeah, I think once I got introduced to them. What kind of kick-started me or gave me that taste of building a business and having things that I wanted out of life from that. And yeah, then just from there, like in that first visit. We just had different, we were just aligned differently, we just had. Obviously, like an amicable party in a partnership to where it’s like, okay, we’ll focus on different things. And we could always come back around and stuff. But I would say that from coming out of college.

To experience new things, failing and things. And kind of like, trying out new stuff, learning and growing and just kind of really listening to my intuition, as I expose myself to. So many things that’s like, what was really kind of. The foundation of my professional career and figuring out what I really wanted. I think for me, especially at my agency, it was one of the things that a lot of people would tell me. Oh, you know, you have to hunker down and you need to focus on one niche to be able to scale up and to have a good sustainable business. You need to be like an expert in one service or an expert in one industry.

And I’ve never really agreed with that, you know, that sounds like. Something that I felt would you know, for an example in the saying of jack of all trades is a master of none. But still better than a master of one just because I think we just a better perspective, like. You know, from a holistic standpoint of just being exposed to different things like you know. Just different levels of what you’re trying to accomplish or what you’re working on all these things.

I just kind of allowed myself to be open to receive as many different opportunities as possible. Different industries, different services. And I think from there, I was able to really forge my way and understand. Where I could provide value, find different needs in different markets, and just kind of attack from there, you know, just develop myself.

Pamela Bardhi
That’s incredible. Thank you so much for sharing a couple of questions that I have to reel back a little bit because your story is fascinating. So what was the process, when you transitioned from baseball into your career? Because I know that that’s never easy, because somebody may be listening today. That may be about to take the step in a different direction, they had felt like they were in the right one. And then now all of a sudden that life presents itself. So walk me through that process a little bit of how you made the decision. And how you got through the decision of, transitioning from baseball to your actual career.

Brandon Gil
I think it was just a lot of love, soul searching and meditating and just exposure to different things. So like, just really understand, Is this like, you’re just looking in the perspective of what I really wanted out of life? Is this something that I am going to be able to invest myself into really see what I want out of it? Or am I gonna have to do something else. So just like in kind of gauging, things like that, I just made the decision. And the decisions are never easy. For some people, it’s easier than others. But when you just feel strongly about something. The stronger you feel about something and you do something that your intuition is guiding you towards.

It’s much easier to make that decision. If you have other things that you’ve been thinking about that you want to develop into. Identifying that is something that you need to transition from one thing. And then understand the next step is another. So then going to the next step is just kind of like, you know, at least for me. I understand and obviously, when you take on new opportunities, when you’re early in your career, like oh. This is it, this is what I’m going to be growing in, this is what I want to do forever.

You don’t really understand what you want to do or I guess like as things change and you realize. Okay, wait, maybe this isn’t what I want to do, there’s more to it than this. And I want to be involved in that. So that’s what I would say leading into that it’s just. You know, not knowing you don’t have the answers. Knowing the only way to get two answers is to kind of fearlessly exposing yourself to different things.

And then I think like that and really just being in tune with yourself. Knowing what you’re more inclined to do and what you can kind of. Get out of these things here that are aligned with your goals. I think that’s what’s gonna help you, make that decision to that next step. But really, that’s all it is, I think it’s also understanding the next step. Is not the all-or-nothing step is not the last step. And there’s gonna be many more steps that come from that.

So I think, taking that next step is important and just kind of being aware of how you feel about things. And it’s not like again, oh, like, okay, I made the decision to go be a teacher. I have to be a teacher now for 20 years for the rest of my life. It’s like, No, okay, maybe, I will go to school for it or I get a substitute teaching job. You know, I don’t really like how the classroom dynamic is and stuff. I’m gonna go do something else and yeah, it’s just like a matter of that. So that’s like, what I would say was really like, what my journey looks like. It just kind of understanding that I wanted to make a transition.

You’re kind of understanding what I really wanted. Out of life and what I needed to expose myself to get those things. And then just having the patience and self-awareness. What you need to manage in your day-to-day with those new things that you’re taking on. Always take time for yourself to kind of like sit back and say, okay, like, you know. Having a board meeting with yourself is just what, you know. The company of Brandon Gil, as a person wants to be in kind of, like, make these decisions and just like, move forward accordingly. Just keep checking in with yourself to make sure you’re happy and in what you want to do.

Pamela Bardhi
I love that. And I love that you said that it’s okay to have a stepping stone just to say, Okay, I’m moving on to the next thing. But it doesn’t have to be the final thing. Because I feel like some people freak out. Like, they’ll open a business or they’ll do something, they’ll take a job that they don’t really want. But what they don’t realize is that may take them to another place. And in your case, you had done the door-to-door sales and then you knew that was not going to be the end all be all for you.

Brandon Gil
I definitely knew quickly.

Pamela Bardhi
You still did it, right. And then that led you to your corporate job and from your corporate job. It led to your own ventures with it, which I think is really cool. And this is also really important for people listening if you’re in a transitional period and you’re about to take a stepping stone. Like, understand that it can be just a stepping stone to where you want to go. Don’t just reject things, because it’s not where you want to be, you don’t just get from A to Z, you know. You got to take some steps along the way to get there and that’s exactly what you did.

And you just kept that mentality of your goals, long term, and you kind of kept going fluid with emotions, which I love. I think that’s awesome. That’s super awesome. I had my restaurants then it turned into real estate flipping and then, I got into brokerage one step at a time. Because if you know you try to get from A to Z. First off, you’re gonna overwhelm yourself. And second off, I mean, you just don’t know what the journey is going to present to you. You know, it shows you along the way, and it’s part of the process. It’s the hardest, the hardest one to get.

Brandon Gil
And that’s it. You know, it’s interesting because I feel like you talked to me. Whether they’re accomplished or had some sort of success. But I just think entrepreneurs, in general, do that, you know. They’re really dynamic and it’s one of those things, they’re in that flow that they’ve had. Like a business that’s been sustained for quite some time. Or for some time, they realize, like, it’s very dynamic. So I feel, he talked to any successful entrepreneur and they are going to tell you. We test different megillah say, like, in perspective of, like, a big new business, like, we throw money to different markets, test different things out. But the keyword is, like tests, like we do different things.

It’s like problem-solving, okay, you know, this happens, you know, what are we going to do, fix it now. And I think that you know, that considering what the most successful people are doing, you need to be dynamic in order to be successful. It’s like the same thing as like, you go through the decision-making process and aligning yourself to. What you want to do, you know, this worked.

I’m gonna stay here, build the foundation, and then move over to that. You’re long-term goals, I really like to play here. And I think about long-term goals and everything. Goals are always like testing to change, right? Like my goals. Now, they’re not going to be what they’re gonna be when they’re 40. When I’m 40-50 years old, I’m gonna have a family. I don’t have a family right now. I’m in my 20s and that’s something that I’m just going to adapt, as, you know, kind of get to new stages and levels in my life.

But the point being is that if you do identify, like a long-term goal, like the path. I’m sure, we’ve all seen that portrait to where the path of success isn’t like this, but it looks more like that. But you ultimately get to that point I think, as long as you keep your head. Because of this problem that I personally had some times. And I wouldn’t even say it is a problem, but was more something that I needed to learn and to be aware of was to where my goals. My long-term goals that quote, require, like a lot of development of different things over time, and I think that’s like anybody pretty much.

And I think that sometimes I would get it. So submerged in the first stage of getting to where I wanted to be. Let’s say like really building and automating my marketing business. And let’s say I remember back to the day before. I had a staff that I was really like literally building the captions, like myself and a document. Putting together the calendar, putting together the graphics on Canva, and stuff like that. I just remember my day-to-day being just so immersed in, I got to create these things, little nuanced detail, so on and so forth.

And I just think that now, like, you just can’t get lost or think that. Like in the grind of what you’re doing in that first step. Even though you get submerged in it, you can’t lose sight of the long-term goal. You know, I was able to think, okay, like, this isn’t gonna be my life, this isn’t what I want to do, that’s gonna get me to my end goal.

So now I need to structure and automate this. And then now I could take that next step, kind of like keep on building, like, in that way. But it is like a building process, you know, and figuring out, you know, kind of like a process of discovery to get to that goal. You just need to make sure that you can kind of pull your head above. Water from time to time to make sure you’re on track and, you know, going the right way.

Pamela Bardhi
Yes, thank you so much for sharing that regard to your business. I was gonna get into that for sure. Because I think it’s so important to talk about where you started, especially. So before we get into your business and what it was like to start, I have a question for you, because those door-to-door sales, that rejection that everybody seems to fear. How did you deal with that rejection? And how would you take that, like, what did you learn from it?

Brandon Gil
No, I think it’s really just exposure is the thing. I think, like, you know, for example. If someone were to get a tattoo, like their first tattoo, that they’re supposed to be in pain. And maybe a little bit painful, but now your second time around, you know, what you’re expecting, you know, what I mean? You could kind of like, manage the pain in that sense or be prepared for it at least as time goes on, like, I don’t have tattoos. But as time went on I could, from what my friends told me that, you know. It just gets better and easier, more manageable. And if anything, it comes to a point where they enjoy it. So I think it’s like the same sense in facing rejection is that you have to understand that you are going to fail.

You are going to face rejection and you just kind of. Need to come up the next time and the next one, maybe a yes. But you’re never gonna get to that, yes. If the fear of failure from the previous note that you got is going to stunt your growth and your ability to get to that next Yes. So that’s like one thing, I really like to think about it. For me, being a baseball player growing up is that baseball is a game of failure. So you know, if you’re batting, three out of 10 times you’re getting hits. You’re batting 300, so you’re 30%, but you’re actually considered in the upper echelon. Like one of the top premier hitters in the league. You know, if you do it for a long time, you’re actually considered a Hall of Famer.

So you know in understanding that you’re gonna feel the majority of the time. In your at-bats, you’re gonna feel the majority of times that you have opportunities and still be considered great. That’s something that I always try to remind myself of in touch, base was that you know. It’s just kind of next at-bat you know. Let’s go like a medic next thing you know and just kind of keep it. Like moving forward from there to lead me into my best. I hit a home run or you know, have a successful attempt at what I was doing. So that’s what I would say like door to door, trying to understand the failure of door-to-door sales and stuff you know. It’s kind of taken me to that, to that kind of understanding.

Pamela Bardhi
So if you basically hit three out of the 10 times that he’s been cleared in the upper echelon, which is kind of insane. I didn’t know that they all had the keto, I get it now.

Brandon Gil
They call baseball the game of life, that’s actually I would say, like, that’s one of the things as well, too. And like growing up as an athlete, you know, my dad, really likes the sports aspect of it. Like you don’t really use it to help me relate to life and different things. My dad was social, like an entrepreneur or you have an entrepreneurial family, like in different parts of our family. And so, you know, I think he was able to kind of, give me some life lessons that, you know, he was understanding of to, you know, kind of fed it to me to the game of baseball.

Pamela Bardhi
So cool. Starting a business from scratch, it’s your first time and building that book of business. And just running it is something of its own, so how was it in the beginning. Because we all know, I’ve told you my stories, maxing credit cards messing up my, like, disaster, I mean, but that’s what it is, right, you need to learn. So, yeah, you starting your marketing venture.

Brandon Gil
It was definitely making sure that I was always trying to find a way to Skype for some money and try to fuel my entrepreneurial habits. I would say, like, I’ve definitely been on eviction notices before. And thankfully, I’m not an eviction notice anymore. But I have been in that case a few times. And so you’re just always trying to make it happen. I think that people got to understand, it’s really tough for an entrepreneur. if you’re not taking any outside investment to be able to get loans and do things that kind of financial flexibility. That you need to keep a business intact, and especially like when building to where you need to invest, that your expenses are going to really just exceed your revenue.

You know, there’s really like a lot of that in my business history. As well throughout the earlier years and even now, you know what I mean? Like, even more recently as well too, like. Sometimes you just have to make a big investment that you know is going to be better for the team. And you just have to do those things. So there was like, definitely, like a lot of financial gaps. I would say in my journey and that’s like, definitely led to some hardships and some good humility. It’s obviously like, there’s a lot of that, but I would say it was just more. So dealing with every single task and every little nuance detail of my business hands-on.

I really built the infrastructure before I have, like, an operations director now. And he’s really helped me take what I’ve had to the next level. But I would say that in that process, especially in the management of doing it all myself before, I brought him on. I know how each aspect of my business works, and you know, all of these things, because I built that foundation. So it was just more day-to-day, you know, trying to figure out I guess, like just how to improve my services and automate my services or my offerings and everything.

And that was much smaller picture things. I would say I’d have been then that’s the thing is, like, I built that infrastructure and I really developed the infrastructure of my marketing agency, I didn’t build that with the intent just to scale the client base, I also built that with the intent to scale a business portfolio. Whether it was my own business, I get a winning idea and I put it in and then outcomes. You know, a winning company, it was either something like that or to where I can use my marketing team. As like the marketing and sales arm of a publicly-traded company and get good equity and value out of that, too.

So those things wouldn’t have been possible. If it wasn’t for me putting in the day-to-day menial tasks and stuff, you know, so yeah. That’s what a lot of the earliest stages of my business look like. We’re just much smaller scale things like my new details and scaling that up and trying to automate it and find ways to, you know, remove myself from that. And also financial gaps, I would say like another one here. Sure. I love it.

Pamela Bardhi
Thank you so much for sharing that Brandon. And so going from your marketing agency and expanding into NF T’s. The cannabis industry record labels and God knows what else is in your pipeline. So how did that all happen? Because I think that that’s so cool. I mean, I told you one of my goals one day, so I just think it’s super cool. Everything that you’re involved in.

Brandon Gil
That’s amazing. Yeah, making sure that I was able to develop so much value and understanding with my offerings. And I was able to find opportunities in the markets. Like really capitalizing on NF T’s are just like a groundbreaking thing. So I got introduced to one of my partners, like my music label partner, like a fantastic group new role Danke, had like a major acquisition. The only public acquisition in this space was from graph blockchain and was able to really develop that relationship’s service. But then, I even leverage myself to administrative control and positions and things like that.

Same thing goes for CBD and hemp. Like they started off as a client providing great value. And you know, from there I was able to leverage a board position and more things as well. But yeah, CBD and hemp when I was exposed to that space. I just saw how I was helping people and I was helping people get off the pharmaceutical medications, I saw child’s. You know, he was there and was able to experience less seizures on a day-to-day basis. And using these products and I was like man I really got to be involved in the distribution of this. That industry was a monster on its own, I just kind of fell down the rabbit hole and really enjoyed it.

And became embedded into, but yeah same thing for. I mean I would say, I just really enjoy emerging spaces like opportunities like that. Especially in growing with the CBD and hemp space. I just have an eye for these emerging spaces and how they work and how to grow them and establish myself. To have like needing market share is like more to come about.

And so yeah, that’s just kind of like what he’s been just following my interest in music, a huge passion of mine. I know we were talking beforehand and I was telling you, you know, being a musician type of thing. Like a long day with baseball was like a dream until you realize that you don’t have any musical talents and it’s tough.

But yeah, no I didn’t just need to practice, right. We just need to practice, that’s it, you just need to focus on learning an instrument and we’ll be good, but yeah. That’s like really all it is is just, you know, kind of figuring out a very strong foundation to provide value. And then also being very aware of opportunities and thinking how can I provide value if this is something that’s of high interest to me.

Pamela Bardhi
That’s incredible and based on your venture in the ventures that you’re involved with? What would be your biggest piece of advice for anyone who’s interested in starting their own business. Or even just taking part in different companies as you have.

Brandon Gil
Yeah, just doing it you know, that’s literally all there is. It’s just doing it a lot of people are just kind of frozen in not really fear. But I would just say like the unknown and just kind of taking that next step. And really you just got to do it, you know. It’s no better day than to start today even if it’s not like obviously okay let’s start my business tomorrow it’s more like okay. Let’s start thinking about what I want to do and what I want to get into. I’m gonna transition to organizing life to accommodate. How you want to get into entrepreneurship.

So I think that kind of advice is to figure out where you’re at in your life. And then just like the next step that you need to take. To make that adjustment into what you want to do um. There’s a lot of information on the internet you can really look anything up nowadays and figure out. How to for things and not reinvent the wheel, but then kind of like figure out that foundation and figure out, you know. You can reinvent the wheel you know. Once you get a grasp and start into something you know, you have to crawl before you walk that type of thing, but yeah, just getting started just doing it.

Pamela Bardhi
I love that I love that thank you so much for sharing that and now I have the biggest question and one of my favorites for you.

Brandon Gil
Oh yeah, exactly I haven’t been too bad thus far.

What Would Brandon Older Self Tell His Younger Self

Pamela Bardhi
What would your older self tell your younger self, based on what you know now?

Brandon Gil
Don’t worry, you know you are kind of focused on yourself and that you can focus on yourself. You know, you could be there for everybody to um obviously like those sacrifices are made. But just as long as you know as long as you do your own thing and put yourself first and you just like to follow your intuition. And what you really want out of life it’s all gonna be good. Everything that you want is gonna gravitate towards you as long as you pass down that path. And that’s like really what I would say, just don’t be scared, just make yourself a priority. Just go get it you know, just get to have some fun and get after it.

Pamela Bardhi
That’s amazing. And I have another question for you and it’ll be my final one I promise. During your toughest moments as you were mentioning being an entrepreneur and basically going through all these different things. Trying to figure it all out, right, and your underdog moments I would say. What was the biggest lesson that you learned there on how you overcame?

Brandon Gil
Just got to stick in there. I think that a lot of people think it’s very easy to give up. And it’s very easy to kind of resort to some comfort when you’re feeling discomfort. Things that’s like you know, the first reaction just naturally. When you feel anything, you put your hand on the stove. Your first reaction is to kind of get your hands off the hot stove. So it’s just kind of like going through the pain. Bearing through just kind of keeps your hand on the stove. Figuratively just kind of like keep pushing through it.

But all these things pass on. Nothing is ever life or death, nothing is ever the end. You’re always going to have the next day to keep building and keep growing. If you fall flat on your face then, I’ve literally fallen flat on my face and you know. Have just not looked good in several circumstances over the years just like understanding that stuff’s gonna happen. But it’s how you grow from it and build from that and understand it’s not the end of the world. And it’s just like what makes you stronger. I don’t think anybody has gotten to be successful without failure. Without understanding how to navigate around failure. I think like unsuccess is what shows you like the path to success type of thing, being successful. So yeah, just sticking through it just there’s no other option.

Pamela Bardhi
I love that Brandon, thank you so much for sharing that you’re a total rock star in your realm and I’m so excited to see what you do in the future. But now tell me what are you up to in the next six to 12 months what’s happening in your world.

Brandon Gil
The next six to 12 months, I can’t give it all away because a lot of it is to surprise and I just want to keep it at a surprise. I would say mainly just like in continuing to develop. We have a lot of good things going on with our companies right now. Like the NASS Valley and the CBD and hemp space and like the new worlds and like NF T’s a lot of that. We’ve said something incredible foundation, seen some great results. And right now the companies are all just scaling. It’s all in that scaling phase, so we have a lot of things set up and plan to keep taking us to new levels. So it’s just going to be like a fun ride.

I think I’m just going to be more just observing, analyzing, and just seeing. Just what happens from all the work that we’ve been putting in. I think all the work has been there. Now, it’s at that time, q4, driving home, q1, you know. Everything is gonna starts launching for the next things that we have plans come to fruition, you know, it’s gonna be fun. Just to let time play out to see like, you know, the things that we’ve been working on clencher going well, all these things.

So that’s what I was saying. There’s a couple new ventures that I’m in progress right now and getting off the ground that are also exciting for me. That you know, that may be, you know, shown. But yeah, I think like right now, it’s just, you know, just scaling to scale for these next companies. We have some exciting things planned. So it’s gonna be fun.

Pamela Bardhi
That’s incredible. Sounds like harvesting season is coming up for you, my friend, you’ve put in the work now it’s time to harvest. Yeah.

Brandon Gil
Let’s see, everybody thinks that it’s a harvest thing until you realize now. It’s still got a couple more seasons ago, still got some months, some more months to go before everything blooms. So just you never know. Like just one of those things. I’m ready, you know, I’m expecting it to be done. But also, you know, I understand that you know, everything also happens at the right time, too. So combination of the both

Pamela Bardhi
Oh, exciting, so exciting. I’m so excited for you and your future and see where all your ventures go and the more of them that are coming your way. That’s for sure. And now Brandon, where can everybody find you?

Brandon Gil
Everybody can find me on Instagram, you can find me at Brandon Gill with one l at Brandon Gill. You could also get me on LinkedIn as well, too, you could add me, Brandon, go to you know. Connect with me socially more than happy to connect. And yeah, you could find all my contact information is there reach out to me. Yeah. I’m always open to having a great conversation. So don’t hesitate.

Pamela Bardhi
Thank you so much for being here today. Sharing your insight, your journey, and all of that you are awesome, my friend. Thank you, thank you.

Brandon Gil
Thanks so much for having me. I really appreciate it. You had awesome questions. So I hope to come back again. And we could catch up and hopefully, we’ve got some good progress to share with each other.

Pamela Bardhi
Absolutely, my friend. I’m so excited to see what you’re up to Super soon.

Brandon Gil
Thank you so much. I appreciate it.

Tune in to the episode to hear the rest of my incredible interview with the amazing Brandon Gil.