Tony Scullion

Tony Scullion is the founder of Tony Scullion Fitness. He is a Weight Loss Expert and a Body Transformation Specialist. Tony had overcome bullying through the desire to protect his brother. He battled an autoimmune condition and a serious spinal injury. Thus, those experiences lead him to where he is. He is dedicated to helping others work Smarter-Not Harder- Perform Better and become the best they can be. His campaign also includes helping over 40’s Execs & Biz Owners lose 20lbs+ without food restrictions. Besides fitness, Tony has an eCommerce & Digital Marketing Consultancy.

Tony’s episode highlights:

– how overcoming bullying, an autoimmune condition, and a spinal injury helped him become a better coach

– the mentors that guided him throughout the process

– the challenges he faced while transitioning to the coaching world

– and his goals for the next six to 12 months

Interested in Tony’s Programs?

You can lose as much as 40 pounds in under ninety days without restrictive dieting or wasting endless hours exercising. Operation Role Model is an online program that compliments your current lifestyle without having to stop eating foods that you love or giving up tons of time for exercise.

Reach out with Tony here:

Website: www.tonyscullion.com

Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/online-fitness-coach-weight-loss-expert-body-transformation-stress-management-peak-performance/

Keep up with the latest Underdog Episodes here:

Apple iTunes: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/underdog/id1534385651

Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/6FbSDu0aNtuxAEiderUAfB

Website: https://theunderdogshow.com/

Click To Read The Transcript

World-Renowned Fitness Coach Transforming Lives, Coach Tony Scullion Shares His Remarkable Journey

Pamela Bardhi
Hello, everyone, and welcome to another episode of underdog today I have an incredible guest here with me, Coach Tony, how are you, my friend?

Tony Scullion
I’m fantastic. Pamela, what about yourself?

Pamela Bardhi
I am doing lovely. I am so excited to have you here to share your story and all your awesomeness. You’ve got so much good stuff happening in your world, and I just can’t wait to get into it. So before we get into all that, I’m going to hit you with my favorite question. You’re ready.

Tony Scullion
Go for it.

Pamela Bardhi
What inspired you on your journey to where you are today?

Tony Scullion
What inspired me was protecting my brother. But the starting point of my transformation was overcoming my own fear, protecting my brother.

Pamela Bardhi
How did that come about? Like what did that situation look like with your brother?

Tony Scullion
Well, I grew up in Northern Ireland where there was a political divide between Catholics and Protestants. And I grew up in a working-class housing estate, there was a group of four students together, my school was at the end of these things. So I was brought up as a Catholic majority of these states were Protestant. To get to school, I have to travel through this and the school uniform was like a big marker on our heads. So not me, that’s a target essentially, straightaway because he knew by the school, we were going to what religion, we weren’t that we didn’t care, we were not brought up to be like that. But that meant that we got bullied quite a lot. And I’m talking about when I was 1011 1213 here.

So it sort of forced me into martial arts, around 11 or 12 years of age. But I still never actually used them until we were running away a day. And my brother failed, they started with a group started attacking, when I ran back to protect them and pull them away. I have, of course how to sort of fight some of the guys to get my brother away and to realize that I’ve been putting these people on a pedestal and living off what was being presented as they were the bad guys. So I grabbed my brother, we laugh, and I realise they’re only the normal decision was made. That helped me build some, let’s say, self-confidence. But it took seeing my brother laying on the ground getting his head Dunstone, for me to make that decision.

I was admittedly a coward before I let them hit me. They wouldn’t have fought back and then have sort of given me a bit of drive to think that why should I let other people control my life? And that has been my sort of ethos, through my whole journey in life. Why should I meet surroundings, environments, or anything like that control my life if there’s a way to work around it to be happy. So you can structure that any way you want for business, for relationships for wherever. We always have an environment or some sort of social conditioning that tries to put us into some sort of box because I never fit it in. And I was always an individual. It wasn’t until I got to around 17 years old, those other people saw the journey.

I had gone through of my teenage years of what three martial arts through protecting my brother through getting respect from these, let’s just say beliefs. Then other people started asking me to coach them, to hide that because I grew up in an environment full of drugs as well. There was a drug capital in North America. So many of the people I knew had started off in soft drugs and they ended up taking them heroin. Some people actually died by the time I was 17. And a lot of people ended up in rehab clinics and whatnot. And in the early years, I did sample, and then as I started to respect myself more on my health, I move completely away from it.

That’s why my life changes. I moved away from everybody in my circle. That was leading me down the bad path. Of course, it was my decision, but it’s your environment that sort of dictates your direction in life a lot of the time. And so that’s when I started coaching others. I’ve been doing that live for us nearly, I think. 27 years I’ve been putting others.

Pamela Bardhi
Wow, Tony, thank you so much. Thank you so much for sharing that. And I mean, it’s quite fascinating when you grow up in an environment like that. When you’re surrounded by bullies, by drugs by all these things, how do you necessarily stay away from it? because it’s the peer pressure, like, what was your journey? And when your experience throughout that, I know you mentioned everything with your brother, but how did you kind of keep your head on straight.

Tony Scullion
The thing is, he didn’t that whole time. That was an on-off journey through my teenage years thought was trying to constantly fit in, so you buy into the oppressor. So that’s when I did take drugs as a teenager, drinking a lot as well. But equally, I was still working. I was still practicing my martial arts. So I think I must survive the three or four hours sleep, but actually, what happened when I reached sort of 17 18 years old. And I started working in the nightclub as a dorm on the weekend. I was asked to be security and it was just a part-time job over the weekend.

And I looked at it as a positive thing, in the respect that I filled my weekends to be doing something which would keep me away from the bad side of the nightclubs. And the group of people I was running a boat with at that point in time. We’re all doorman. They have entered weightlifting. I know a lot of them took steroids, but they have entered weightlifting and martial arts. But was having peers to work towards something better. These guys were much bigger than me. My nickname when I was about eight was for renal, as in Lucifer, he knew from the Incredible Hulk. I had spent all those years abusing my body between martial arts and one side and then all the badness that was involved. So I think my actual hormone levels didn’t really start working.

Until I started properly, looking after myself from 17 years onwards, then I just massively put on a lot of muscle. And those are the years so I was like the skinny on our exit, look at kids, who then suddenly put on all this muscle and everybody thought it was on steroids. But most probably was because my immune system was so dampened during those teenage years. But it helped me develop so fast. And I think in a way, that’s what got me people that knew me from the teenage years. Who was trying to break away from the negative aspect of things, saying, Wow, we’re gonna change policemen? I want what he’s got. So I actually started coaching some of the people that had been through the years bullying me.

And the reason I looked to help them was that I had people that helped me by the wall. I was in no respect, they taught me a different life, how to move away from it. They mentored me to a degree. So I thought that they don’t have somebody that can actually help them out of that wall. And so that’s why, again, that’s the protective element for me that I honestly really tried to help as many people as I can.

A lot of people don’t like hearing about fitness and martial arts and all that stuff. But, it can help somebody move beyond and have some sort of self-love, self-confidence, and who they are. Whether it’s they need to lose weight and need to get away from an addiction, or they need to maybe get stronger, maybe need to put on weight, whatever it is. That’s what I’m truly passionate about using my negative experiences to help somebody get to the goal faster.

Pamela Bardhi
I love that Tony, I love the passion in your voice when you talk about it. It’s so exciting that I have a couple of questions for you to kind of reel it back a little bit. So what did you want to be as a kid when you grew up?

Tony Scullion
Oh, astronaut Of course. Or fireman. Um, I always said that I would probably work in it or electronics or something like that. That’s I have my goal on financial goals or fancy cars. I did manage to get some of them but my journey started off the dorm on the weekends, but I was an engineer during the day. The cooking was part-time at that point in time, in the evening. So I went from being an electrical, mechanical engineer, to IT and electronics, and eventually became a project manager. So, up until about 2008, that was my full-paying daytime job. And would you believe I get so many plans? For my evening work? I’d have my day job. Because anyway they never show by what it was plus.

Pamela Bardhi
That’s so awesome, though, because that’s the thing. Like, I feel like especially in these types of jobs or different industries. Where it’s very much what is what would you consider? Is it the right brain, the one that’s very, like methodical, and mathematical and all that? Like the very much right brain? So they don’t really like talking about things like emotions, like overcoming things or like the life stuff. I feel like, that’s more on the left-brain side, you know what I mean?

Tony Scullion
Me, they’ll have the courage to challenge myself.

Pamela Bardhi
Yeah, so that makes total sense. Oh, that’s a brilliant move.

Tony Scullion
That’s a good marketing strategy.

Pamela Bardhi
It’s brilliant. And you mentioned a little bit earlier that you had some mentors in your life that helped shape you and put you in the right direction? Who were some of them? And how did they help guide you throughout the process?

Tony Scullion
The beginning was some of the guys on the door that were paying 15 years older than me, work in the nightclubs. So as much as I have martial arts skills, I didn’t have a lot of laughs. So they were teaching me I suppose how to make your best weapon is your voice and your mindset. How to avoid facts and how to you you can have all the skills in the world. But it doesn’t matter if you’re surrounded by a gang of people with weapons, they’re going to get beat.

So the biggest thing was about strategy, building rapport with people, avoiding fights where you can. And also abide awareness, the big things about awareness, which came into this loose combat situation and clubs. But it was also self-awareness or safety when you’re right places. Because of where I was, you had to be careful sometimes, where you were going in like, say, with a girlfriend or something like that. There are times I have been bottled. And it’s not nice, but being self-aware, has massively helped make the best of a bad situation, let’s say. So, yeah, they mentored me through the life skills, how to talk. As a teenager, I never really had any girlfriends, I was the ugly duckling. So what that meant was in my 20s, I was the juggler.

Pamela Bardhi
I love it.

Tony Scullion
I was the ugly duckling, he suddenly discovered what a woman actually does like. So I spent those years and my 20 enjoying my life in that respect. But that teaches you a lot of lessons to buy what the value in life and what’s false, what’s real.

Pamela Bardhi
And that’s a hard thing to differentiate, though, too especially at that age when you’re seeing all these things for the first time. And what’s crazy is you’re handling the nightclubs in the drunk capital, which is probably the most dangerous job you could have. I think because if someone wanted to pull one on you, they could you know, wow.

Tony Scullion
Then actually, we progressed to a nightclub on the border of Northern Ireland and Southern Ireland, which was a bigger concern. Because you have both divides between Catholics and Protestants. And then you have divided between the North and the side. It was also an amazing experience. I suppose you have to put yourself out there in life, to face challenges when you get the other side given the learning so much.

Pamela Bardhi
Right? Absolutely. And the last time we chatted, you mentioned that you did have some hardships as well like spinal injuries and autoimmune diseases. And some people could look at you now and be like, Wow, Tony, super fit. He’s got the muscle, he’s got everything going. What they don’t realize is that you’ve also been through some challenges yourself on a physical level, as much.

Tony Scullion
Whenever I pull out for desks on my spine. It was like my whole world was over. That’s what I felt like that was about maybe 12 years ago. But what motivated me at that point was a friend of mine who’d been in an accident. He lost the power of his legs completely and ended up in a wheelchair. His name was Dora the arrow. As soon as he was able, was back in the gym, not able to use his legs in the winter, climbing up. He fell off the bench many times got on the bench to start doing weights.

Over time, he got learned to get as balanced back and steam weights. He was doing whichever route racing, I’ve seen him fall off the winter on the side of the road and just push himself back up on it. And that massively inspired me. Because what I had was nowhere near what had happened to him. And he just got essentially back on the saddle. For me, I sort of I was depressed for a couple of weeks. Then I was disgusted with myself for being so weak-minded. I thought of our own, I just thought Yes, he still went to winter resistance day. If he can do that, I can easily do it because I don’t have anywhere near the struggles that he has. So I need to mon the hell up. Find a way to get right this.

The way that was really good because it taught me to really dive deep into body mechanics, biomechanics and nutrition, nutrition for healing. Because a lot of the physios treatments I was getting, were only taking me so far, I have severe nerve damage. And one of the pictures I have on my website is actually me 90 days after I damaged my bike, and I was in like a Thai boxing pose. I wasn’t in that ship, I had to obviously train for those 90 days to get in shape. I couldn’t even use my core properly, I couldn’t do crunches or couldn’t do anything massively flat. So I had to be creative and find ways. And going in for even for a photoshoot about a day, I was limping in, and then there was I managed to do a warm-up.

That’s I had to do like a nerve release, which lasted 10 minutes, which gives me about 10 minutes to tell the body before the nerve would trump up again. And we’ve got the photographs down. And that was a case of I did this to help bite that was another coach actually hired a photographer as a client. He says to me, you need a challenge, you have a challenge. You work hard. So after that, I thought you’re right, I need a challenge. So why committed publicly the claim of mobilock. I took up gymnastics as well, when my physio says, you take up gymnastics nine, I was nothing great. It was just to be inspired by the level of athleticism of the guys and the kids in the class that helped push me forward.

I was told that a few do a lot of out spinal mobility work and the band’s, you’re going to risk severing your nerve and your spine is already damaged. You need to take care for at least the next year or two. I sort of thought, well look, I’m down to if I do, damned if I don’t. I’m in pain every single day. So you’re talking about surgery, surgery is a 50% chance. So I’m going to take the risk and monitor it myself. All I could think of every time I was struggling through training, was one of my friends was the instructor for claiming Montblanc.

All I could think of was, I think this is hard, this is going to be nothing. Nothing too high heart is going to be climbing one block. And that’s why I talk myself through all the challenges not push myself harder each time. And then just over a year, maybe a year and a half later, I play my blog. It was such an amazing feeling. So it’s an amazing feeling.

Pamela Bardhi
Oh my gosh, I love that you share with me your mantras a little bit because a lot of what you’re doing is mental stuff. Mental work, which a lot of people see someone who’s physically fit. And they’re like, oh, yeah, they’re super physically strong. Like, that’s great. That’s awesome. However, it’s more of a mental game than it is a physical game is covered

Tony Scullion
By expectation. I’ll give a very, very simple situation. You know, interval training as Yes. So if you were saying I’m going to go and do some sprint interval training, let’s say you were doing 10 seconds of a sprint 50 seconds of a walk, right. So whenever you start getting tired, those 10 seconds as you progress, and the intervals are going to seem longer and longer and longer and longer. If you only kind of tan during those 10 seconds. By the time you get to arrange your fifth set, you’ll actually be counting to probably 50. Because subconsciously, if you’ve got the cardio to support it, you’re going to be pushing harder to get over what quicker.

So if you manage your expectation and sanguine 50 each time so you on Bolla, right your expectation is met, and it’s only equaled. Let’s say you do 10 sets, it’s only equal to either of those handsets. So your confidence is time. So if you use that like overreach mentality that helps you then with the now the pill at the moment and get past that. Or that has helped for me as simple like if you’re doing reps as well. And you have 20 reps, count them and four sets of five, chunk the goals down into smaller minds. And probably same with your real estate investing. I won’t have a portfolio of 10 by let’s say, the end of next month. Or break it down just one other time, well then need to get one other thing.

Pamela Bardhi
Yeah. Yes, I love that, you said that about the reps too. Because it like, what’s funny is because I do this to myself all the time. So the way that you break things down in your head is exactly the same way that I do it in my head. I’m like, Well, if I do this the way that I used to look at school, I’m like, okay, there are 10 to 12 weeks in this semester. So I looked at it as 12 weeks, because when I thought about months, it sounded so much longer. It’s like you’re still doing the same thing.

But whatever perception in your mind, that’s gonna take you’re using for, you know, five reps of four, it’s still 20. At the end of the day, but for some reason, your mind can take it in and be less overwhelmed when you break it down. And they call that principle to chunking down they got in my neurolinguistics programming NLP that I’m certified, yet chunk it down. And then it makes it less scary. It’s fascinating, though, isn’t it how your mind just feels better when you do that?

Tony Scullion
Absolutely, because it’s more achievable as the same if we’re trying to create any sort of new habit. If it’s in your mind a long distance to create the habit, then you’re going to stay away from it. You’re not going to do, for example, let’s just use running as an example. So you’re thinking about the actual room. But if you’re let’s say you finish work at 5 pm, you’re setting up a computer effort at 4:30 pm, you put on your running shoes, and you’re running here.

And then at five, you knew you’re going to have to maybe take some electrolyte drinks, whatever it might be, but by 515 530 will be wrong. Because you’ve taken that small step, that gateway habit to put on your running gear already. The chances of you actually going to do that habit is 10 times higher. So it’s just as you say, chucking it down to the smallest component. So that can help you get one when out of the way, and then move forward.

Pamela Bardhi
I love that, Tony, I love that. That’s awesome. And it’s truly like such an amazing piece of advice, honestly, just in life and in anything. Like if you just break it down, it makes it that much more simple. Now, question for you, Tony. So when you transition from full time into, like, how did you make that transition into your coaching world? Because again some people get stuck with these golden handcuffs of work. And how did you make that transition? And what was that like? Or some of the challenges that you faced in that process? Because I mean, you were in mechanical engineering, I’m sure it was a comfortable job.

Tony Scullion
IT before I left before I went full time. So it was well paid. It was very well paid. And it was a credit crunch. I was going to be on the market. Two years of experience as a project manager. So at that time, all people with 15 20 years’ experience, we’re going to be on the market. That was my actual program manager. The head coach actually said to me, Tony, what have you been doing more or less time part-time, you need to full-time at that’s an obvious thing for you. I did, within no time at four boot camps running and separate times throughout Northern Ireland. And I was doing between 40 and 60 pt sessions a week. That’s when I started experiencing burnout.

Also around the time after a couple of few years of that, I discovered I actually have an autoimmune condition as well. So it was going from working for other people to my passion, putting so much work in, and then I was like wow. But it didn’t have business sense. And that was my problem. Time management was a major factor. If I could have cloned myself, or if I could clone myself I probably would still be back in Northern Ireland. So everything in life happens for a reason. And that’s why I’m willing to buy.

Pamela Bardhi
That’s so awesome. I mean, you know, starting a business especially, when it’s brand new to you, there’s so much to learn. Right and then you mentioned burnout and every there’s not one entrepreneur that I know that has not experienced running into a wall, especially when you’re first starting. First it a lot of the time you don’t even recognize it right. So how did you recognize it? And how did you push past that?

Tony Scullion
Injuries that was the lead up to me, damaging my spine. It was all injuries during martial arts. Because martial arts have helped us so to be so bulletproof in the mind. It was a case of if he had an arm fell off, you would carry on. That’s the way our instructor how this, like if we felt sick, he would have says, Go and be signatory. Let me get back here. So that’s, in a way the mentality of it. But the thing was, I was getting all these injuries. I couldn’t understand what it was, as far as I was concerned, I was eating all the right things. I was getting enough rest and then went on for quite a while. And I had to work on re beefing up my adrenal glands and realized that that was adrenal fatigue.

From doing so much because I was working so much I was still exercising because exercising actually was a stress relief, believe it or not. And then that was actually my mom was born in the hospital was something and they discovered that she had hemochromatosis. That’s an overlooked disease. They only say we need to test the whole family because it’s hereditary. There’s two sides to it, you can be a carrier, or you can have the symptoms, or you can have both. And that turns I actually have both of the chromosomes. So but then that was actually a blessing. The cause was an answer. That was a reason why I keep burning oil because my arms too high. I was near a walk through the airport was the wall. No, it’s not my piercings are. It’s my blood.

Pamela Bardhi
Oh my gosh, Wow. That’s crazy. I didn’t even know such a thing existed. Like, yeah, never heard of that.

Tony Scullion
My body doesn’t get rid of iron the same way. Most normal people do. This means it can cause oxidative stress in the body, which will affect the heart, the liver, the adrenals, thyroid, the joints muscle. So I also used to think I had mass. I was diagnosed with arthritis from a young age after some of those injuries. And it turned out that it was actually the iron in the joints from hemochromatosis. So again, I was like, Thank You, Lord, at least we have an answer. But we live and I don’t have to live with SPM the rest of my life as long as I do certain things. I can work my way.

Pamela Bardhi
Wow. Well, I mean, at least it gave you some sort of understanding because you were kind of running into it. You’re like, what the hell’s going on? I’m good. You know, I’m eating well, like what the hell’s going on? Interesting. And wow, you’re still able to carry on? Which is incredible.

Tony Scullion
Yeah. That’s why I’m so blessed that I get to exercise. No, I have to, I get to exercise. I got that opportunity every day. So as long as I’m able to do that, and to look after my body, that’s why I’m a passionate avoider.

Pamela Bardhi
That’s a beautiful way to look at it, though. I get to not that I have to. That’s something I need to incorporate in my go. Well, sometimes you take it for granted, right? The fact that you have an able body that can do these things. And you sometimes it’ll work out like me.

Tony Scullion
Loads of time. Oh, boy Stein’s here’s one thing, you have to ask yourself, well, why am I doing it? So why don’t want to be an athlete? Do I need to train seven days a week? Right. You know, you have to put everything into perspective. Again, like I was saying about goal setting. It’s about if somebody is exercising and restricting their diet, why are they doing it? Are they going to be an athlete? No, we don’t need to be so restrictive. There’s ways to do it without being so restrictive. And that’s essentially what I teach, how to live a fulfilling life, enjoying the foods you actually like drinking alcohol if you wish and still be able to stay on top of your fitness goals.

Pamela Bardhi
Yes, Tony, I was gonna say what are some of like your tips and tricks and the sneak previews of your coaching here, if you will?

Tony Scullion
Well, most people put on exercise. I suppose we already all know that. That’s all nutrition, but that doesn’t mean that has to be rabbit food all day long. That doesn’t mean you have to cut carbs. That doesn’t mean you have to be so restrictive. Do you want to bend out other times, it’s all about finding those habits that can gradually fit into your life. And then they become part of your lifestyle instead of becoming stressed in your life because that’s what fitness is all by actually removing stress from your life. I think that’s a look at you. Also, it’s for me to be happier within my life. And that’s the way I think everybody should be with it.

What Would Coach Tony’s Older Self Tell His Younger Self

Pamela Bardhi
Yes, I love that, Tony. I love that so much. And you’ve dropped so much wisdom throughout this entire interview. Like I love it. So so much. And so now I have that this is my favorite question ever, is what would your older self tell your younger self based on what you know now

Tony Scullion
Face your fears faster. Because fear is usually an illusion that will force you in the wrong direction. Face your fears faster you can achieve so much more. And we all have fears we all have insecurities. We all have things that we don’t want to do. I’m scared of heights. For example, claiming a month-long was a big deal for me climbing towards on the third day without the tooth sickness. I’d have this haven’t slept properly, we would have three days I haven’t slept properly. I was altitude sickness. Every step was immense effort. A blizzard blowing in my face.

Two people have died the day before. And all I could see in my peripheral vision to the yellow skips, the rubbish the trash skips, that go in the back of a lorry. I was seeing these in the snow. Like my subconscious was telling me. That’s where you’re going if you stay focused. That was like what the Fed gave you see that we stay focused people focus on the sun coming up over the top there.

Pamela Bardhi
That’s crazy. So you started seeing these things? Wow. Oh my god. And two people had died the day before.

Tony Scullion
Two people have died the day before. Not at our party. But the helicopters tried to rescue them. They fell off the peak kind of Yeah.

Pamela Bardhi
Holy crap. Oh my god. So what kept you focused throughout that experience? Because first of all, I’m afraid of heights too. So the second that I like, looked down at something I just get like sick in my stomach. And I can’t imagine.

Tony Scullion
Everything Yes. So I just there that’s the thought process goes into the mind because you’re thinking about the negative things. So automatically try to control your breathing. Let the adrenaline subside a bit. Like Box breathing four seconds and four-second hold for a second dive for a second hold. Come back into the present moment and then focus on something ahead. That doesn’t mean looking dead.

Pamela Bardhi
Right. Wow. I almost feel like that’s chucking it down to you. Wow, that takes extreme courage and strength, my friend.

Tony Scullion
Tremendous loneliness thing. CFI was going up through a lift to like a high floor, let’s say the top of the penthouse or something like that. And that was a glass surrounding on the right side of the building on the left. And if I look outside and don’t have myself in the control mindset, my legs are below me. Unless I can control my mind that fear is still there. I haven’t overcome it. 100% But I can’t control it when they get myself in a mindset of even skydiving. But I had to really meditate. It’s able to go up and Skype you back. What is the boss is that achievement, that sense of overcoming yourself? That is the boss you get from

Pamela Bardhi
I know I can only I mean I go on rollercoasters. Everyone laughs at me and they’re like, we’re afraid of heights like how does that work? And I’m like because I close my eyes. If I had anything to do with looking down, I tend to open them when I’m at the top. And I don’t look down then I feel better. That’s so awesome

Tony Scullion
The good point of that overrides the negative.

Pamela Bardhi
Yes, exactly. I’m like I opened my eyes when selectively when I’m on Yes. Oh, Tony. That’s so awesome. Now in your world, like what’s up in your world in the next like six to 12 months what’s happening?

Tony Scullion
My coaching is fully online live. So my goal in the next six to 12 months, actually wants to travel to the States as well. So in person, but my goal in the next six to 12 months is to try and impact over 500 laughs does help them get himself respect. They deserve my program called Operation role model and it’s by each person becoming their own role model. Because that’s the reason why you would do a transformation after all.

Pamela Bardhi
Awesome. 500 lives you’re aiming to impact in the next six to 12 months. Oh, that’s so cool. That’s so cool. And now you’re fully virtual so that everyone can have access to you no matter where in a world that they are, which is even more awesome.

Tony Scullion
Certainly, most of my clients are in the United States and Canada anyway.

Pamela Bardhi
That’s incredible. And you’re in Dubai. Yeah.

Tony Scullion
I’m in Dubai. So there’s no, there’s no limitations. We have an app for exercise. We have zoom calls with me, they have my personal WhatsApp number. So it’s, the only reason somebody will not make progress for the program is if they decide to hide.

Pamela Bardhi
That’s so awesome. And what’s like a sneak peek of this program? What does it look like? What different challenges do you have?

Tony Scullion
So the bottom line is understanding what’s holding somebody back, primarily focus on weight loss and building that self-esteem. When you understand what’s holding somebody back, you can integrate those new habits, that PS which will suit their lifestyle. And if there’s somebody like yourself, that’s super busy, they don’t have a lot of time. During the week to spend on exercise and Food Prepping and all that rubbish. Then it’s a simple matter of when you look at your lifestyle, and we understand rates are high, can we look at what you’ve already got, and just reorganize it in such a way that it makes it super simple. And then you’ll gradually build those habits over time, that will get you to where your optimal self needs to be.

And for most people, it only takes about six weeks to develop those new habits, and then they can master what needs to be done. And then the key is just being consistent after that. It’s not a quick fix thing, because I’m actually teaching from my experience last 27 years. How to manage your food and how to still eat your favorite food and not feel guilty because that’s what a lot of programs will do. They’ll say, stop eating carbs, you can’t eat your sweet stuff, you can’t drink your alcohol, whatever. And I believe that everything’s available, you’ve less chance of rebounding.

Pamela Bardhi
Mm-hmm. Absolutely. That’s awesome. That sounds like such an amazing challenge and just could change lives and it’s going to 500 of them. I know you’re going to get there.

Tony Scullion
We have already helped over 600 people so another 500 the next year with what I’ve got going on online should be achievable. If I work hard on.

Pamela Bardhi
And you’re totally well. I know you will just five sets of 100. Right?

Tony Scullion
Yeah, all we have to do is have 100 squats and push-ups every day. It’s that simple.

Pamela Bardhi
It is a working everybody find you, my friend.

Tony Scullion
So probably best to look me up on LinkedIn, or my website. So just look up my name Tony Scullion. And you can contact me either via LinkedIn or through my website, which is tonyscullion.com, and we can get a chat to understand what your challenges are, hopefully, help you work past them. Within 90 days to six months, you’ll be a new person.

Pamela Bardhi
I love that good. Thank you so so much for being here today for sharing your story, your wisdom, everything. Thank you so so much, my friend.

Tony Scullion
Appreciate your time Pam.

Pamela Bardhi
Thank you.

Tune in to the episode to hear the rest of my incredible interview with the amazing Tony Scullion.