Tim Herriage

For nearly two decades, Tim has been on the leading edge of the Real Estate Investor space. It includes being the Founder of the 2020 REI Group, the Founder of B2R Finance (a Blackstone Company), the Founder of the REI Expo, and a Franchisee and Development Agent for HomeVestors®️ of America. Through his ownership of various companies, Tim aggressively invests in single-family houses, primarily in the North Texas area. Tim has completed well over $1 Billion in real estate investment transactions, including the acquisition of more than 1,300 houses.

 

In this episode, Pamela uncovers Tim’s incredible journey to success. Among the highlights are:

 

– What inspired Tim on his journey to where he is today?

– Which certain circumstances in Tim’s life taught him to be grateful?

– The lessons and experiences Tim acquired while serving the Navy?

– The challenges Tim has to face after his service? What led him to real estate?

– Tim’s advice to his younger self based on the things he knew now?

– What’s coming up in Tim’s world for the next six to twelve months?

 

Listen to how Tim Harriage shares his remarkable story. Listen to the full episode here:

– Apple iTunes: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/underdog/id1534385651

– Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/6FbSDu0aNtuxAEiderUAfB

– Website: https://theunderdogshow.com

 

If you found this story worth your time and made changes in your life, we’d love to hear from you! Subscribe and leave a review.

 

Catch up with Tim on his social links here:

– Website: timherriage.com

– Facebook: www.facebook.com/timherriage

– Twitter: twitter.com/timherriage

– YouTube: www.youtube.com/c/timherriage

– Instagram: www.instagram.com/timherriage

– LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/in/herriage

 

The Underdog Podcast host is none other than Pamela Bardhi. She’s rocking the Real Estate Realm and has dedicated her life as a Life Coach. She is also Forbes Real Estate Council. To know more about Pam, check out the following:

– Website: https://pamelabardhi.com

– Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/pamela_bardhi

– TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@pamela_bardhi

Click To Read The Transcript

Tim Herriage Shares His Amazing Journey to the World.

Kevin Harrington
Hi, I’m Kevin Harrington, an original shark from the hit television show Shark Tank and you’re listening to the underdog podcast

Pamela Bardhi
Hello, everyone, and welcome to the underdog podcast today I have an incredible guest here with me. Tim Herriage. How are you, my friend? See you. Oh man, I’m so honored to meet you though. Like, honestly. Well, we met at the family mastermind about eight, nine months ago, which has been incredible. And like immediately I was drawn to I think the first night I had dinner with you and like a whole game. Yeah, the

Tim Herriage
Big Charlie, stay calm. Yes,

Pamela Bardhi
Yeah, we were there and we ordered way more food than we could ever possibly eat. Ate with our eyes for sure. And I just remember connecting with Ben on my man Tim is just like a genius. I need to know more about that’s such an awesome, awesome person. I’m just so excited to have you here today. Like really hear your journey because I’ve heard bits and pieces of it as we’ve always been chatting about the mastermind. And then like a little bit today, so I just can’t wait to get into that. Tim truly, but like my biggest question for you to start with. This isn’t a loaded one. You ready? Yeah. What inspired you on your journey to where you are today?

Tim Herriage
I think family or a lack thereof would really be probably what’s always driven me the direction I go.

Pamela Bardhi
Can you elaborate on?

Tim Herriage
There’s another loaded question. Yeah, I grew up divorced family mom that worked all the time. Older brother, three boys. I’m the middle one. You know if you know any middle child, like we’re always everything’s our fault. My dad moved away when I was young because of a relocation. And I just always longed for, like, I wanted to be normal, right? Like I think a lot of kids do. And then there was another divorce in high school. My stepdad who had kind of raised me like turned out to be just crazy person. There was one episode where I walked him out of the house with a shotgun to his head, you know, just not fun. We were at a party. I didn’t graduate high school on time graduated out of summer school, because I had attendance issues.

My grandfather died of it. Tama tragedy, my senior year in high school, my grandfather dies, my best friend blows his head off. One of my friends gets killed in a lightning strike on the football field. And my mom and my stepdad get divorced, was within three months. So like the second half of the year, I was an s head and like, just skipped every class. So finally graduated in summer school, we’re at this party. And this guy had come back from the Navy and he was wearing his uniform, pull it all the chicks. My buddy’s like, Dude, we need to join the Navy. He’s a year older than me.

My mom ended up marrying his dad, too. He’s a year older than me. So he’s been hanging around town, even longer than me is like a has-been Yeah. And I was like, Dude, if I joined anything, I joined the Marine Corps like my grandpa, and he goes, Fine, let’s do that. Within 24 hours, I joined the Marine Corps. Then the funny part is, is like it got down to swearing in. I had already pledged to protect and defend the Constitution of the United States of America. And I look around my buddy’s not in the room, and I go out into the hall, there he is. He’d been medically disqualified before the swearing-in for high blood pressure.

So to begin my time in the Marine Corps, I was on the buddy program without a buddy. And they don’t let you take that oath back. You’re 18 and you don’t say I you know, never mind, my buddy, Brian didn’t get the call. I was on the bus the next day. I mean, that’s kind of where the lack of family came from. And then five years super lonely in the military, deployed in 17 countries in less than five years, including Kosovo and Montenegro, and Croatia. Kind of the same neck of the woods where your family’s from.

And I just remember one day, I looked in the mirror, and I did not know the dude looking back at me, Sergeant Herriage was in the mirror. Tim Herriage had disappeared. And I just always dreamed of having a family. So I got out of the Marine Corps and tripped into real estate on accident. Put my resume on the website got hired as a project manager for a flipper, here in Dallas. And now I run a company that we’ve done well over a billion dollars in sales this year.

Pamela Bardhi
Oh my goodness. Well. Mic drop Holy crap. That is amazing. Thank you so much for sharing that. I think first and foremost, thank you for your service. Thank you seriously. I mean, it’s just your trajectory is insane. I’m telling you. Well, it’s hilarious to me how you saw that guy in the navy suit getting all the chicks up.

Tim Herriage
We’re better than the Navy, we’re uniforms.

Pamela Bardhi
We can always have that debate. I always hear that like, all my friends were in like different services. They’re like, mine is way nicer than yours. And they just like, get into it with one another.

Tim Herriage
Please put a pole underneath this episode online. And I guarantee Marine Corps dress blues wins, hands down

Pamela Bardhi
That ball and that gala and all

Tim Herriage
Go hang out in the mall. And like, yeah, maybe I’m volunteering my time to help children.

Pamela Bardhi
Every Marine I’ve ever met is like the most incredible person seriously, it’s such an amazing group,

Tim Herriage
Two of the most common denominators of fortune 500 CEOs are that either played college football, or they were in

Pamela Bardhi
Discipline. It’s a level of discipline and consistency.

Tim Herriage
Accountability, which I consider to be the fundamental flaw in America’s correct was a lack of accountability.

Pamela Bardhi
100% Because you can say things but then you don’t do things. And then if you don’t get held accountable for that, it’s someone else’s fault, always. So now as a kid reel it back just a little bit. What did you want to be when you grew up?

Tim Herriage
To be a Texas Ranger, Texas? Well, actually, when I was a kid, I wanted to be a preacher. My dad was a preacher before he got divorced, which back then to Southern Baptist was over. I just always loved church. It was like the one place we went every week where there was just love and acceptance. And I always wanted to be a part of that. Then I wanted to be you know, the typical high school male in Texas. I thought I was gonna play for the Dallas Cowboys. And then as I got into my teenage years, my adolescent, late adolescent years, I wasn’t a very nice person.

I mean, I put my mom through a lot my older brother got, he’s probably got 10 or 15 felonies at this point in his life. In and out of prison more than he’s been not out of prison. And he was my hero growing up. Because my dad was gone, my stepdad was gone. So that was hard to watch when you were growing up, like, I mean, I’ve seen him dead multiple times. Yeah, multiple heroin overdoses, and people keep reviving. You figure there’s a purpose for installing the earth. So I don’t know. I mean, at some point, I really didn’t want to do anything other than just be a drunk and, run around my hometown and try to pick up chicks.

And then I joined the Marine Corps, like I said, on a whim. When I got out of the Corps, I was going to be a state trooper than a Texas Ranger. And then I had to make money. So sold some life insurance for a year got recruited by one of the boiler room operations. It was like an appointment setter, and then they sent you all around. I tell the story a lot to my boys because they got to understand. I’ve been the guy sitting at the sprint PCs store, going into my truck trying to find enough change, to get my phone turned back on. So I can call them borrow money for gas to get home. That experience probably still limits me in some ways. But it also makes it where there’s just nothing I could encounter. I can’t be

Pamela Bardhi
Mm-hmm. Well, the thing about that is like you remember those moments? And I think it puts you in more of a state of gratitude now at this point in time at what you’ve achieved. Because How insane is it to be self-aware of like, wow, this is who I want was once before, to hear I am now

Tim Herriage
The sees Pam to me and what I’ve seen in this world. That’s not even the thing that helps me be grateful. When we were in Indonesia, in an operation to stabilize we liberated East Timor, from the Indonesian government. We’re actually from the west Timor anyway. We pull up there’s 15 20 Marines, we secure the beachhead, the area where our vehicles are landing on the boat from the boat. And there’s this little boy walking up to us and is you’ve probably seen in movies, hopefully never seen in real life.

There’s like these countries where they outfit these kids with IEDs and get them to walk into the troops and blow them up. And this kid coming at us and we’re screaming at him he doesn’t understand English. And meeting our rules would have allowed us to shoot eight-year-old kid. He comes up and I was a sergeant I was God’s corporal in charge of patrol. I said, you know, hold your fire. He’s making motions toward his mouth.

My Lance Corporal pulls out a cracker these MRA crackers, there are four-inch by four-inch crackers that you would not eat on a bad day. And that little boy broke it in half an hour broke the house and a half and ran back to share it with his siblings. So I remember that all the time. Because imagine being willing to face down US Marines with weapons pointed at you screaming because you’re so hungry. And you’re willing to face that to feed your brothers and sisters. So yeah, there’s no such thing as a bad day in Rockwall, Texas.

Pamela Bardhi
No, no, wow. I just got chills everywhere right?

Tim Herriage
If I remember the feeling, I remember the smells. I remember the patheticness of everyone that ever complains in his country. Because even that day standing outside of the sprint PC store trying to find change. To turn my phone back on, no one was going to shoot me. I could have walked over to the Jason deli. I remember because I actually ended up hanging out there waiting. And sat inside in the air conditioning, not being shot, or blown up by Allameh.

Albania has landmine problems. Croatia has landmines so when I hear someone and I’m not a political person, I don’t like any of them. That’s my personal opinion. And when I hear an American complaining about America. Number one, I feel grateful that we live in a country that allows them to do that without persecution, or prosecution. But number two also wants to punch them in the mouth and tell him to go somewhere else. So, split, feeling respected, but also wanting to hit him.

Pamela Bardhi
Because you’ve seen what it’s like on the other side, and how the other world lives. And I mean, I was in the Dominican Republic on a service trip back in 2009, in high school, and like, that changed my life forever. We were there building houses. And like I remember one day we visited a dump, a dump, a literal dump, right? There were people there picking. And guess what those people that we met there.

They were the happiest, most grateful, kindest people, and like you would see that they would pick through and find meta. Metal tabs and cans and stuff and create bracelets and things out of it. And I just will never forget the joy there. Because I’m like, I have nothing. Absolutely nothing to complain about. My life would never be this right. And here we are complaining Wi-Fi. Isn’t that fast? Or this? Or, you know,

Tim Herriage
My dad, the Wi-Fi is lagging. You just shut it off. Go play outside. I know go into your safe million-dollar neighborhood. Yeah, it’s gratitude, I think is something that allows me to weather a lot of storms.

Pamela Bardhi
Absolutely, absolutely. But what I find really respectful about you is like you. So when you looked in the mirror, you describe that moment that you looked in the mirror. And basically, you didn’t know who that person was, on the other side. What sparked that self-realization because sometimes we go through life. And we don’t pay attention for a long time. But if someone’s unhappy, who’s listening right now, or knows somebody who is right.

Tim Herriage
I was at the precipice of a decision. I was up for re-enlistment is the end of my initial term. They were offering me a $50,000 tax-free lump sum reenlistment bonus because we were in a combat zone. And there was this thing where if I signed the papers in a certain area. It was all tax-free and lump sum and my mom was telling me please come home, we miss you, which made me want to stay. My dad was telling me I should stay which made me want to come home kind of person I am. My dad’s like, son, you could retire when you’re 38 and have a whole nother career. And I was thinking, Well, that sounds awful.

My mom’s like, you’d come home and get into real estate because she was a real estate broker. And I was like, Well, that sounds awful. Oh, for two. But I did miss my brothers. Specifically, my younger brother, who’s absolutely my best friend in the world. I just remember I was standing in front of the sink on the ship in the Mediterranean Sea, actually the Adriatic Sea. And I looked in the mirror and I mean, this is high and tide horseshoe flat top, sleek jawline, camouflage. I could run three miles in 15 minutes, I was marine of the quarter all the time meritoriously promoted. Would have had a fantastic career.
I’m 44 I would have been retired by now I have no doubt I would have made it to the highest levels of enlistment. But that mean sob that was looking back at me is not the boy that my grandfather raised. It was not who I wanted to be. They were telling me I had to be overseas even more. Because I was so experienced in intelligence and counterintelligence.

It was right after bin Laden the head of just attacked the USS Cole and we had been at port with her the week before. So I was just burned out and so it was looking in the mirror. But also kind of feeling the weight of your heart almost I know that sounds like really I love it. Like I felt the weight of my heart and I did not like the person looking back at me. And Texas is just always where I wanted to be. So I got back home.

Pamela Bardhi
That’s amazing. I just love that you made that decision and you just stuck with it and then followed your heart and basically came home. Because what would the consequences have been had you not done that right?

Tim Herriage
Well, yeah, because the next year was one of the worst in my life. Because I get out and military really does not do a good job preparing young men and women to take care of themselves beyond the service. Which is why that’s I give a lot of money to our veterans and to sick children. Those are two people I feel really sorry for. I don’t feel sorry for veterans, I want to support overdrawn time bank accounts. Because of the military, everybody that gives you credit or whatever. They get you to fill out the form where they can just deduct it from your paycheck.

So for five years, I never had to pay a single bill. They just took it out of my paycheck and whatever was left they gave to me in my bank. And you could pull the cash out of the ATM and go spend it on beer and eat in the chow hall, we ran out of money. That was four years. So when you look back, that was in 2001, when I got out about before 911. I’m living at an apartment with an old military buddy of mine who ended up taking his life and 911 happened. I’m sitting there on the couch. And we’re both in the intelligence community.

So we know exactly what’s going on. I was immediately recalled, I had to drive to the base in Fort Worth. My major call me from my last unit, and he was like, we’re first up, we need you to get back and give me orders. I’m away. Because at that point, I really wish I’d stayed here because I was going nowhere. I was like very separation hard from the military is hard. But the colonel and the reserve unit put me in what’s called a mission-critical billet where I couldn’t be activated. But yeah, my old unit, my last active duty unit was one of the first ones in Afghanistan. Life would have been a lot different than I got no,

Pamela Bardhi
And imagine that, like I always say one decision away from changing your whole life. So choose carefully, right? And be very intentional with what you want. So you mentioned that you got into project management. That was your first job kind of out of it for a real estate developer, military. hard.com. Really, military hired.com.

Tim Herriage
That’s why I put my resume out there. The one thing that did teach us how to do a resume when we got out, and I got hired as a parent. Well, first, I got recruited for a life insurance sales company that last like eight months, and it was awful. I mean, just 20-hour days driving two or 300 miles. That’s where I got my first taste of a commission check. Like the second month, I made like six grand in a week. Oh, and they had it where you turn everything in. Like on Wednesday and got paid on Friday kind of thing. And I just remember that six G’s tasted really good.

Because of the mills in the Marine Corps, when I finally got out, I made $1,810 A month before tax. If I went to combat it was tax-free and got an extra $100 in combat pay. Yeah, beer money. very consequential at that time. So when I made six grand, that is when I decided I can’t have life insurance at all. Because that’s when I decided that no one will ever tell me what my time is worth again. That I would always have upside. And I have always had upside and equity and everything I’ve done from that moment forward.

Pamela Bardhi
That’s amazing. So walk me through. So you went to life insurance. And then you went to the project, man.

Tim Herriage
Yeah, life insurance. And then it was run by some people that are not from America that did not really care much about 911. And I’ll just say I almost got arrested when they told me that they didn’t care what had happened. That I was going to come to work. The Marine Corps wasn’t all the way out of my blood yet. Still isn’t. Never will be. But yeah, so I put my resume back on military hard.com. I met a guy named Tim worked for him for a year. I told about wanting to buy rental houses because I’ve been reading and watching the RIAs and the late-night commercials.

And I decided that owning assets, owning real estate was going to be the way that I would be able to take care of my family. And I guess Carlton sheets is to blame for that. Because the late-night infomercials when you’re drinking a beer with nothing to do smoking a cigarette. Yeah, I mean, so I just you know, I started going to RIA meetings anyway, so worked for them a year. They were like, Nah, we’re not gonna let you do that with us anymore. I was like, God Fine. I’m leaving, went work for home investors over the ugly house people franchise here and

Pamela Bardhi
Ugly house people.

Tim Herriage
With a couple that we bought the houses weren’t forgotten Bobby wrong for a year. Same deal. He said if I didn’t do it for a year. We’d start buying rentals together because again, I didn’t have money credit advice. I didn’t have a dad really to that thought that way. My dad was like, go get a job, get a salary, invest in the stock market. One day you’ll be able to retire and worry about money I love you. But after a year, I’m at number one in the nation of all the home investors franchises. I bought 111 houses in the first year. And then he didn’t take me to convention, which is where they give you your wars.

So I was like, I quit while he was gone. I’ve always stood principle above all else, even to my own detriment. And my wife is like, couldn’t you have like thought about anyway. So you know, I left there and I went and sat down with a hard money lender here in Dallas, and I said I I’ve got some money saved up. I want to go out on my own. He goes, I’ve been watching the way you were let’s partner up and you can use all my money as I’ve sold. We built a portfolio of 63 owner-finance notes that year. That was in oh four.

And then oh five. I’ve got the assignment of contract hanging in my wife Jennifer. Just framed it for me in oh five. This lady calls me up and says, Well, I got your name from Katie. She’s got that sweet southern drawl. I believe you told us anyway, she had this house that she needed to assign and she had never assigned houses before. She was a new home investors franchise. I was like, send me the address. I’ll go look at it. So I went looked at it and she had it way underpriced. I’ll take it. You’ll love this.

I had my office fax her an assignment fax. One hanging up in my office still has the fax header on it. Oh, like my kids. When I was trying to explain it to them that I don’t understand why you typed it up. They’re like it’s a ladder on a fat anyway. So the joke is she made like $3,500. So it’s me. Well, I sold it to another investor for AGS. The joke is we got married to keep it all in the family.

But I operated my other company for about another year and then took a payout, which turned out to be great timing. Because in oh eight, there weren’t many payouts to be had. We almost lost it all in a way. It was in we almost lost our marriage. It was tough. Then we had another son and oh nine, which tells you we didn’t lose our marriage. You know, it was tough. But this was probably my first instance of dialing back and going into my shell professionally. And I know seven I’ve done 143 flips. Wow. And I don’t mean for other people. I mean, we bought I fixed we sold. I mean millions a month coming in and out. It was awful.

But up until then we were up until the subprime crash. We were making just a tonne of money. Yeah, man, I was 26 and lived in a $2 million. La it was just nuts. But we paid for that. No way. And oh nine and 10. I didn’t do much. I just kind of like sold vacant rent houses on owner finance and cried. But we worked our way out of it ended up with no foreclosures and preserved our relationships and did it the hard way. She became an REO agent for foreclosure companies. And then I started this little company, I’m going to start talking faster. And I’m going on and on.

I started a little company called the REI Expo. Have I missed the home investors conventions, the networking, the annual because I got a lot of energy from that right? And like people were so willing to share. And I was telling you earlier, I’m just such an intentional listener. Like if you’re talking I’m listening, even though I’m not running. So I started and I was like, I’m just gonna be a trade show for real estate investors. First year, we had 200 people. A magazine guy was like, Dude, I love what you’re doing. We need to take this national. I said no. So me and Dallas. Well, the next year in Dallas, we go from 200 to 22 to four to 440. We doubled and he’s like, You need to take this national.

So I’ll tell you what, we’ll go to Houston. 2012. We go down to Houston. It was okay. And then in 2013. I did Dallas, Baltimore, Chicago, and Anaheim. And we had in 2013. In the Dallas show. We had 800. So we doubled year over year over year, and we had two or 300 in each one of the other shows. But it was first year and that was on plan. Right? Well through the expo in January. A lady that spoke was an attorney that did the contracts for the five-star Expo which is here in Dallas.

She told the conference organizer I was a good speaker and ran a great conference and he should get me to speak. Through that speech. I’m the guys that started invitation homes for Blackstone. They were just getting ready to start a lending company. And this got to Nick who was the founder comes up to me afterward. And he’s from London. So I have to say it properly. He goes. So we’re working on a project and we need your help.

And I had no idea who he was. I almost didn’t go speak at this conference. Because it’s out of my league. It was something I’d never done before. Nobody wants to hear me I’m still hanging on to these things from my past, right? Like, I’m just this idiot redneck, I don’t have a degree. These are Fannie Mae executives and all that. But I went and I have my Marine Corps coin in my pocket. I still have the picture of that day, where I took a picture of it and said, doing big things today. Carry that coin a lot. And I gave a great speech.

And two weeks later, I flew to Manhattan and had a 30-minute meeting, and left I call them love, and like I’m done. She’s like, What did you do wrong? I don’t know. But that’s just the way to have meetings. I mean, the velocity of money when you’re talking hundreds of billions of dollars boilers, they don’t take long to make decisions. They knew that I would run their company when I walked into the room. Five or six words in. So anyway, they sent me down back on a plane and I’m like, Honey, I don’t know, I guess I screwed it up. But you know, and I’m blaming myself redneck Tim couldn’t get it done a month later.

I’m flying all over the world running the multibillion-dollar company for them and ran that for a couple years. Then took a couple years off. I was telling you earlier that I should not have done that really lowered my level of thinking. Hanging out with my sons and my contractors. There’s not a whole lot of high-level thought going on at a rehab project. But we took finance of America public last year, I got to participate kind of in a public offering. That was fun. And here we are. I met Jeff Tesh at RCA and capital, the CEO. I’ve been borrowing money from him for about six years now. And he called me and said helped me run this thing.

And I said, Alright, and so it’s been so amazing the last 12 months to be back into billion-dollar conversations. We’ve done well over a billion this year. And it’s done so much for me that now I’m literally moving out of the residential real estate space into commercial and multifamily syndication personally, not RCN. Because I’ve decided I’m going to be a billionaire. Yes, I remember when I became a millionaire, we celebrated. I remember when we ended up realizing that we were worth 10 million. It was an accident because we just kept doing what you’re doing. People don’t stand and take 1000 to a million is 1000 times to take a million to a billion is 1000 times. It’s math.

And to get to 10 million was like an accident. Now we actually participate or own about $100 million worth of assets. And when you start looking at that, I’m only 44. God willing, my health maintains I should probably have about $100 million net worth in the next six to eight years. If I do that, I just keep leveling up and growing. I keep my mind engaged. I know as long as God lets me live to 60 or 65. I’ll be a bit bitter. The more I say that the more it actually feels like I’m supposed to say it, more it feels like. She’s like a given now. Told my wife told my kids told a crowd full of people just set it on the number one podcast in the world.

Pamela Bardhi
Yeah. That’s it, men. Well, it’s intention right at the end of the day. And you’ve been able to stay consistent, stay accountable and stay on all of this. And you asked me this question earlier. What would be the number one thing in your experience that you would say if I didn’t do this, none of this would have ever happened. For me. It was the restaurants and I think for you, it’s Marine Corps.

Tim Herriage
Absolutely. United States Marine Corps is the world’s finest fighting force. It’s where I learned all men are created equal. There’s no man-hours, there’s no room for racism or bigotry. The drill instructors will tell you well, there’s light green, and there’s dark green Marines, but you’re all Marines. And you all bleed red, so you better figure it out. And it’s such a powerful organization. It taught me so much about leadership. It taught me so much about accountability. The 14 leadership traits the United States Marine Corps, justice, judgment, decisiveness, integrity, dependability, tact, accountability, courage, knowledge, loyalty, and endurance. JJ did Ty buckle, you know those things? If you can master those, they become a part of who you are. You can do anything?

What Would Tim Older Self Tell His Younger Self

Pamela Bardhi
Absolutely. And I think they fully integrated into who you are today, and why you’re going to take yourself to the billion-dollar mark. So I’m gonna mark this conversation today. So that when you get there gonna be like, Tim, want to be at that celebration when that happens. Together, I hope I hope we’re both popping bottles together and making that happen, Tim, seriously. And this is my favorite question. For you. You ready for this one? What would your older self tell your younger self based on what you know? Now?

Tim Herriage
This is a two-part answer. I’ve been getting this question a lot lately. The answer would be one more. And I don’t know if you’ve read my let’s new book The Power of One more. It’s just amazing because it’s what I’ve been saying for a year, as my answer in his book goes like 25 levels deep. If I kept one more house every year, just one more not one more than planned. I would have an additional $10 million net worth of net worth. Today. If I’d kept one more house out of everyone I sold wholesale, I’d probably be worth $20 million more. If I kept one more house for every house I had the opportunity to bid on. I’d probably already be a billionaire I’m just people don’t understand the power of compounded effort and the Marine Corps. Back to them.

We had these big five-tonne trucks. And the joke was always people like how many more Marines fit in there. The joke was one more but it’s actually almost an underlying mentality of abundance. Like, don’t worry, we can fit you in. We got you. So yeah, if 44-year-old Tim could talk to 24-year-old Tim. He’d say, Dude, live as cheap as you can and stack assets. The Pam mine and my wife’s rental portfolio has gone up 180% In the last 10 years. Now, I’m sorry, the last five years, it’s like 230%, last 10 years. If I had been stalking assets instead of fighting to survive. And oh, seven and Oh, eight. I mean, I’d be the guy that we’re writing about in The Wall Street Journal.

And not that that’s not some sort of validation. I’m just trying to say like, it wouldn’t have been Blackstone. They were talking about it had been some guy named Tim from Rockwall, Texas. So yeah, that’s it. I mean, it’s one more, one more Hello. One more goodbye. One more. I love you one more house. That book that I have Ed’s I met last week, which was an awesome thing for me. It really speaks to what I had already decided to. But simplistically, I’d say one more house a year would be the biggest thing I would tell Tim. And I’d tell Tim, you know, find a way to do one more of everything too if you can.

Pamela Bardhi
I love it. Tim, thank you so much for that. And so what’s up in your world in the next like six to 12 months? One more house? One?

Tim Herriage
More? Yeah. So like we’ve done well over a billion and RC and capital this year, we loans for real estate investors. It’s kind of my full-time focus right now. I need to get to 2 billion this year. Because I need to get to 5 billion next year. And I need to get to 10 billion the year after that. So yeah, one more, one more billion. Then because it’s a struggle to get to 2 billion this year. And I know the crazy, extreme environment.

But I literally can envision a time in the next two years when we’re doing well over 2 billion a quarter. And then I see us merging with a REIT or going public I don’t know. I mean, we’ve proven ourselves as a, we can deploy capital. And we and we do it with great integrity. And we have a great reputation in the industry. That’s something we’re very proud of. So I think that’s, you know, I am looking for ways to deploy 100 million dollars at a time type stuff.

Pamela Bardhi
Nice. Yeah, that’s gonna happen, you know? Oh, without a doubt in my mind. You said it’s gonna happen.

Tim Herriage
Oh, I look at it every morning. It’s a look at every one. That’s my only focus is, how can I get to blood? Because if it gets 2 billion, then five is the target. But we know I’m not the kind of guy that misses targets.

Pamela Bardhi
You gotta let everyone know where to find you. Where can everyone find

Tim Herriage
Just find a way to spell my name. Tim Herriage. And I’m at Tim Herriage on all the social media platforms. Because I’m the only one there it’s I think there may be another one or two. But they’re just like they’ve given up. I think they go by Timothy now. So I am I’m even on Tik Tok. You’re on my kids make fun of oh, I can’t wait to see that. Yeah, so RC and capital is easy to find at Tim heritage. I’m struggling What about Gen X or whatever. I want to be a millennial. When it comes to social media, I think it’s powerful.

I mean, this is the way God fathead that. We didn’t have YouTube so I had to wait until the third Thursday of the month. And go to the Ria and sit there for five hours with the yellow and sell in from the stage on the archaic bulletin boards. Trying to get someone to help you and oh my god, like a whole new world. People don’t understand like they can be where I am in 10 years instead of 20. And that’s frankly, I think that they’re lazy.

Pamela Bardhi
Yeah, I mean, the speed of technology these days. And Tim, you’re amazing. Thank you so much for sharing your story today. Like such an honor to have Tim here today. Thank you.

Tim Herriage
Thank you for having me. Thank you for what you’ve done. And I hope to be a part of it once you outrun me.

Pamela Bardhi
No, we’re gonna do it together. That’s the best way. Thank you so much everyone for listening in. So that’s it for today’s episode of the underdog. Catch us next week, always dropping on Thursdays. And remember, if you’re interested in real estate, or want to learn how to create more money and magic in your life. Check out meetwith pamela.com and let’s chat sending you so so much love.

 

Tune in to the episode to hear the rest of my incredible interview with Tim Herriage.