Olivia Jaras

Olivia Jaras is an internationally recognized expert on the gender wage gap and salary negotiations for women. She is also considered one of the top resume experts in the United States. Her work has been featured by Forbes, BBC, CNN, MSN, The World Economic Forum, Recruiter.com, Lifehack.com, and hundreds of other global media sources.

Olivia is also an international, bestselling author of the book Know Your Worth, Get Your Worth: Salary Negotiation for Women (2016). Together with her team of experts, Olivia helps women all over the world realize their market value and how to advocate for it.

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Olivia Jaras Shares her Underdog Story

Pamela Bardhi
Hello, everyone, and welcome to another episode of underdog, today I have an amazing guest here with me. Olivia Livia, how are you?

Olivia Jaras
I’m good. And I’m so excited to be here with you, Pamela.

Pamela Bardhi
So excited to have you, your energy is amazing. I love the work that you do. How you show up on LinkedIn and everywhere else that I see you and just everything that you’re doing in your world. So I am pumped to talk to you today and hear all about your story, so I guess I always start with a loaded question, right? Like what inspired you on the path to where you are today?

Olivia Jaras
Oh, what did inspire me? So long story short, I help women get their shit together when it comes down to their careers. And earning potential and getting them back on track with that purpose that they’ve always had. But never felt good enough to pursue. So what got me on track with that was really kind of struggling with myself at a really young age. I tried to do the right things, I went to school in Boston, right near where you are, and kind of studied the things that I was supposed to study. And then, I went into the workforce and the Great Recession happened and I lost my job. Which was a shitty job, to begin with, and what ensued was me trying to apply to 1231 jobs. I got five interviews and zero job offers.

And I’ll remember it clearly like this one particular week. Because obviously, I was keeping track, I was in the unemployment office. I’ve been there for hours because this was during the Great Recession. People would have to line up outside of the building. Like starting 5 am, for when the doors opened at seven to claim an unemployment jacket, you couldn’t do it online. I remember vividly this one day, like I’d shown up at like five there was like, roughly 9 am, it was my turn. And when I go up to the clerk, I show him the list of jobs that I’d apply for. This particular week, I’d been rejected from McDonald’s for two different positions and then, there was my resume there. Which showed that I’d gone to Tufts University, which is a pretty good school in Boston.

And then I had an MBA and all these things. The clerk looks at my list of jobs that I’d applied for in the last two weeks. Looks at my resume and says, gee, I guess that expensive East Coast education didn’t pay off, did it. I’m like, I didn’t even make it out of the building. I collapsed to the ground and started bawling, I just felt so shattered. It was such a shitty moment in my life. Because also add to that my dad had died a couple of months earlier. And my husband was deployed in Iraq in a really dangerous job. So it was just like, Oh my gosh, like, my life is just, I remember just sitting there bawling in front of 1000s of people.

I didn’t care this way, I was like, why? All I want to do is to be a contributing member of society, I want to feel worthy. And yet the workforce is just rejecting me left and right. Like, what am I doing wrong? I just literally kind of got on my knees and I was like if there’s a God out there. Why are you fucking me over? And it was one of those moments where I just had this. You know, like when there’s something deep inside of you. It’s almost like the color of a phoenix rising from the ashes. How do you think there is this voice that clearly speaks to me? It’s not that you are broken, it’s a system that’s broken.

I didn’t really understand the meaning of that at that point in time. But it gave me enough encouragement to get up and somehow make it back to my house right where I was alone. My husband deployed every single time the phone rang or someone knocked at the door. I was ready for them to come and tell me that my husband wasn’t coming back for more rights. So I was like moping on one side. Because he was an officer in the army and just doing a very dangerous bomb clearing mission for 15 months. Then on top of that, I was feeling completely dejected. That ensued like I went back home.

And I just remember, I probably spent days thinking about this phrase. Because it was just so vivid inside of me, like coming back. It’s just not you, It’s a system that’s broken. I’m like, What the fuck does this even mean? Finally, it sank, I realized because I was grabbing my computer to start applying for more jobs. And I realized that’s the problem. People are applying to jobs online thinking that’s how you land your dream job. I’m just applying left or right for anything that shows up and that’s when I had the realization.

On one end, I was going through an online, like applicant tracking system. You hear about the resume pile like you don’t want to land on the resume pile. Well, this was a virtual repository of resumes and on the other hand. I wasn’t even clear about what I wanted. What kind of job I wanted to learn, I was just like applying to things, because I was desperate. Like, we often find ourselves needing money, we don’t have the income and such. And then that’s when it clicked. I’m like, this is not how you live your dream job. This is not how it happens and from that. What ensued was me realizing that when it comes down to landing my dream job, what it took was what I and what came really naturally.

After this realization was to do things, the way I instinctively should do them, I followed my instincts and I said. You know what, I would love to work at the IDB. The inter-American Development Bank, which is equivalent to the World Bank, but for Latin America. I would love to be managing a budget and project. And I’m going to find out who does this. How can I get in this position? Like, how can I land this dream job? How can I network my way and have these conversations and I’m going to land that job? I was like, I don’t care if I’ve been rejected, but I’m going to land that job.

And literally, I did that. I repeated this a couple of different times with different dream jobs like working at Ivy, League’s and lending like cozy corner office jobs. Until eventually, I also realized after doing this, like a couple of times for myself. I found myself advising other women, I’m doing the same thing. It’s almost like this is a different kind of pandemic, that women don’t realize on one hand, what they want. But furthermore, they don’t know how to go after it. And they don’t know how worthy they truly are. We’ve been sold this bill of goods that sucks like that. We’re not worthy enough. You know all about this, I mean, you built yourself from the ground up.

Pamela Bardhi
Absolutely. Now, you said so many things that are so good. I just love you, it’s just like being in that moment where you’re at rock bottom. Because that would be your definition of rock bottom. Like, all this stuff was hitting at once you’re applying for 1231 jobs. Your husband’s deployed the situation in the unfortunate passing of your dad. Which I’m so sorry for by the way. In those moments like, how did you propel through to elevate in the best way possible? Because you’re dealing with like every single rejection and of course, anxiety. And then obviously pain and grief. I know there’s people listening that are maybe going through something similar. Or experience one of those three. And how did you sort of break past that or what was sort of your process and how you got through it.

Olivia Jaras
So two things kind of generally come to mind, whenever those rough moments hit. And I know you and I have talked at length before about like Tony Robbins and his work and such and one of the things that he says that is so true. Life is not happening to you. It’s happening for you and I truly think that as women. We’re truly cut out to be one mother trucking resilient bitch. If you’re willing to put it politely. I know that inside of every single woman then probably meant to. But I’m not a man, so I can’t really speak for them. There is resilience beyond measure.

And if you can find yourself in that hole. In that dark place and have the sight or the foresight or insight. Whatever you want to call it to say I’m willing to see this differently. What is the reason for this to be happening, whenever tragedy has hit in my life and my family? And you know whether this was like my brother also died. I had three miscarriages, all sorts of different things have happened. They happen to so many women that we don’t usually talk about these things. But every juncture I’ve found resilience and asking myself. What is this going to help me learn so that I can later teach? Because I think that’s absolutely true.

Like all of these failures, all of these things that happened to us happen to us now and maybe we can’t see it now. But eventually, once that lesson has been accomplished. Once you’ve gone through that hell and come out on the other side. It’s going to be your turn to help someone else come out of that.

Pamela Bardhi
100%. It’s like, Well, you know, a lot of times what happens is we spend so much time reacting. Instead of becoming aware of the situation like. Okay, what can I learn from this situation? Because it’s so hard to step back and be like them. What’s happening here? Why is this happening? What am I meant to learn? Because the problem is at that point in time. Like you don’t really know why that’s happening, usually see it from the outside looking in, like later down the line. But there’s always a reason or there’s always something that happens. There’s blessings in disguise, there’s all these different things. Because especially in your case, right, where you got rejected 1231 times like. Would you have been pushed to be where you are? If you didn’t have those rejections?

Olivia Jaras
Oh, no, hell no. I wouldn’t be in a position where I’ve helped at this point, 10s of 1000s of women reclaim or claim 10s of millions of dollars. That they were leaving at the negotiation table. Like I would never have the knowledge or the tools or the insight. Or the wisdom to help women at all career levels. Because I wouldn’t have the experience. And that’s the thing with all of us. If we don’t go through these experiences.

I personally really believe that our biggest failures are what we are here to teach. Once you get over the hump, realize that it’s okay to fail and to have miserable moments, that you don’t really want to talk about. That you don’t want to share with the world, not right there. When you learn to embrace it, you’re going to make a difference. Whether you’re doing it as a business owner or as an employee or as a friend or as a mom or parent. When you embrace that failure, that makes a difference in somebody else’s life. That’s so powerful.

Pamela Bardhi
Yeah. I mean, that’s the whole reason why I started this podcast was to show people like, hey. There’s common denominators and all of us have an underdog story in all of us. We just don’t talk about it. And here we are, we’re here to talk about it to know that you’re not alone. So those women, the reason why you’ve been able to impact the way that you have. Because you can connect, you’re like, Hey, man, I’m a woman. I’ve been there, I’ve done that.

But like, I’ve had my hardships, and here’s how I came out on the other side. That is the most amazing thing to learn that vulnerability is actually a strength. And not a weakness is like the coolest. I’m just so inspired by you and that you took this to a whole nother level. So when you transition and you got that dream job. And then, so sort of walk me through how you created basically your own business. Because sometimes no golden handcuffs catch a lot of people. They don’t want to go off on their own and set their own thing.

Olivia Jaras
Right, my background and this is one of the things that I kind of fell into. I don’t even know how I landed into this industry. But my background is in compensation. So like, I’m an expert in people’s salaries. And this is kind of the kind of field that I ended up not by design. But I ended up being pretty good at looking at people, figuring out. How much they were worth and helping companies set salaries and recommend salaries. And actually one day, I was at the peak of my career, I read an article by Sheryl Sandberg. I think it was in the New York Times, something kind of blaming the gender wage gap on companies and organizations.

Like the companies, we are being transparent enough and that governments are sorry. Not organizations and governments weren’t doing enough for women. I actually got really pissed, I was like. You know what, no, screw this. I’m the one setting people’s salaries and I’m being completely impartial to embrace gender. And all of those nuances are enough government regulations. Here to ensure that we’re not discriminating. And so I kind of went out to prove that there was no gender wage gap. I looked through 1000s of salary recommendations that I’ve suggested or that I’ve sent on to hiring managers. I’d given them a range for their identified hire to hire between zero and 100%.

And I looked at the data and the conversations with the hiring managers and looked at everything that was going on. It did turn out that indeed, we do have a gap. That whenever we’d hire someone or a woman was being hired. She’d be hired hovered around the 25th percentile of the recommended range. And whenever a guy was being hired, he would be hovering around the 50th percentile of the range, so I was like, Whoa. What gives like what’s going on? So I kind of went down that rabbit hole and what ensued was me realizing that. When it came down to it, it wasn’t that there weren’t enough government regulations. Or that the companies didn’t want to pay fairly.

But in the actual negotiation process, women either didn’t know what they were worth. So they just accept the offer. They’ve just been edited, started the job, they wouldn’t even talk about salary. Or even if they did, they did not know how to ask for it. They didn’t want to lose the job. So they wouldn’t actually ask for it. Long behold, we did have a gap, like I was like, okay, we do have a gap. It’s not for the reasons that we think we have it, It’s really about women and kind of owning that responsibility. And at this point, I was like this, this is my calling.

I want to teach women how to own responsibility. If they want more money. It’s on their shoulders, It’s within their control to earn more. They just don’t know how to do this. Because we haven’t culturally been trained to do this either. In order to land our dream job, we have to be assertive, we have to negotiate like a man. But when it comes down to it as women. We’ve got such better tools than guys do to advocate for ourselves, but we just don’t know it.

Pamela Bardhi
I love that. And then you just took the jump and started your advising business, just straight from there.

Olivia Jaras
Yeah, I started coaching people on negotiations. And slowly it started building over time and now, we’ve got 1000s of women that we’ve helped everywhere. It’s a team of people and it’s just growing and it’s growing like crazy. My work has been showcased on a wide variety of platforms where I like. I wake up every morning, like, where did this all happen from? A dream. From an underdog, right?

Pamela Bardhi
Yes. Oh, my God. Absolutely. So I have to ask you, this is you’re basically Superwoman. What did you want to be when you grew up?

Olivia Jaras
A veterinarian? Maybe still one day, right next round. When I grow up, same principles. You’re helping people, you’re helping you have a lot of animals. We live here in New Hampshire in the middle of nowhere. And I got like, three Golden Retrievers two cats, husband, kids, may as well be a veterinarian. Same thing, animals running everywhere.

Pamela Bardhi
No, it’s always so cool to ask. And see, because most people what they wanted to be. When they grew up, somehow it’s correlated to where they are now. So you’ve got all the animals to see. It’s still always tied to your future self somewhere.

Olivia Jaras
Exactly. How about you? What did you want to do?

Pamela Bardhi
I wanted to be Britney Spears, I wanted to be like a performer. Like that was my thing. Well, my big thing the reason why I loved it so much is I loved basically putting on a show. And like making people happy. Like That was my big thing and if I could do that. I could feel their energy, that was always my most exciting thing. So it’s weird because now I’m heading into the speaker world. It’s so interesting how it’s kind of like, somewhat parallel, which is so interesting.

Olivia Jaras
I’m glad that you’re doing what you’re doing, I’m really kind of glad that you didn’t follow Britney’s footsteps. I mean, maybe I don’t know what she’s been up to these days. It seems like things didn’t quite turn out the way everybody expected. In the long run for her.

Pamela Bardhi
Oh god, no, but you know. Being a 90s kid growing up and Britney Spears was like the one, that she wanted to be like, oh my god. So…

Olivia Jaras
like on the peloton bike?

Pamela Bardhi
No, I’ve heard so much about them. But I have not written one yet. No.

Olivia Jaras
Well, you can use it like on your app if you have a stationary bike. But my favorite instructor is this guy called Cody Rigsby and he jams out to Britney Spears every single ride. There’s absolutely it’s really like I love it because that was our time. Like those were our glory days like Britney Spears. Boys, Nsync.

Pamela Bardhi
All the glory. Oh, yeah. And I always say like when I have kids like they’re gonna grow up listening to things like the gym.

Olivia Jaras
Oh, yeah. Yeah. And the other one that I love was a little bit, before our time at Whitney Houston.

Pamela Bardhi
Oh, yeah. Like you jamming out. Houston and we had Pink and Missy Elliott. Like, Come on, like rebels, like amazing women in our lifetime. Which has been so incredible. I mean, we’re blessed to be in this era, I think where we are today. And I mentioned that last week, I was at a retreat and I mentioned this to people, that I was with my astrologer. We are entering the era of the divine feminine, which is really interesting. Which is, it’s in the planets, where we are right now, at this point in time.

All these things, female empowerment, everything is shifting, at this point in time. Like it was meant in history to be like this. Because of the way that the planets are right now. And I thought it was so crazy because I’m like. What is this one big coincidence, so what an exciting time to be alive and to be a woman and to be a part of this whole revolution? And just like amazingness and that’s exactly what you are. You’re an advocate, you’re a warrior for everyone that you help and just women all around the world. Which is so amazing and I have a question for you. What would be like your biggest tips in negotiating? Because I know that this is definitely something that everyone’s gonna take away from for sure. Especially the ladies listening,

Olivia Jaras
I like your astrologer. She sounds like a very, very smart woman. The truth of the matter is like when it comes down to negotiating and advocating for yourself. We have been led to believe. Because men were the first to market when it comes down to the workforce. Finishing up the crops or whatever, like farm life was left. While the men went to work in industries they were doing what was considered like modern-day labor. So they were the first when it comes down to setting the pace. And setting the tone of what looks like success in the workforce.

So when women entered World War Two. We were one like we started entering the workforce. As women we tend to follow like, we don’t like to rock the boat, right? We don’t want to get kicked out of the tribe, so we followed suit. With what it looked like to be successful, like men in the workforce. So this meant if we wanted to be successful in the workforce. We had to be assertive, uncompromising, direct, to be a go-getter. And to really be determined, right, which we’re all if you think about. Those are all masculine traits. They’re not feminine.

And this is why for so long and this has been shifting very recently. Women have tried to rise up in the workforce, trying to use these traits. Not realizing that when you use those so-called nurturing skills, those mothering skills. You can be 10 times more successful at negotiating than a car, your case in point in real estate. Like you’re an incredibly successful woman and there is not an ounce of macho feel to you. You’ve got all of those tools. And it’s funny because women are like, Well. What do you mean? I’m like, Well, listen, as someone who hangs out with a lot of negotiators. Some of the top negotiators in the world, I’m going to tell you, who is the most revered negotiator of all time.

Hands down by every negotiator, top negotiator, whether it’s FBI hostage negotiators. Or multimillion-dollar salary negotiations, like big deal negotiation. Do you know who it is? Oprah Winfrey, Oprah Winfrey is considered hands down the world’s best negotiator. Reason being she can get anyone on her couch. Whether it’s Tom Cruise or someone on death row. To sit down and confess absolutely anything she wants them to. And she doesn’t do it by being assertive, uncompromising, direct, pushing for an answer. She does it by being trusting, nurturing, empathetic, listening. All of those super nurturing and motherly skills.

These are all tools that as women. We have just by virtue of being born female, regardless of your gender, affiliation. You got everything you need to be an incredible negotiator. Which is something that most women haven’t been taught. If there were one thing that I could tell your listeners understand. That you have everything you need already, to be an incredible negotiator.

Pamela Bardhi
I love that. And I didn’t know that about Oprah, like. If she was lingering in my mind, but I’m like, I don’t know if she qualifies, I did know. And it’s a woman, top negotiator in the world. That’s so badass. I love that.

Olivia Jaras
Yeah, it’s phenomenal.

Olivia’s Favorite Success Story and Best Experiences In Advising Women

Pamela Bardhi
Wow, wow. Oh my gosh. And now, what has been your favorite success story in your career of advising women? What has been one of your best experiences that you’ve seen?

Olivia Jaras
So many stories. Like we have this little community, it’s a private small community called the empower society. But it empowered her society and it’s just so cool to be part of something. Where women come in and on a daily basis. They start sharing their stories and how they’re starting to realize that. What they themselves are God’s gift to the world. Whatever designation you might believe in, owning the fact that your Creator did not fuck up. When he or she created you and endow you with all your visions?

It’s so and to be part of a community that does that, like growing into those shoes. And as I say, like putting their big girl panties on and realizing what, own it. Because you are truly the gift is kind of, like loaded on a daily basis with amazing little miracles. So I think there’s way too many stories for me to pick one specific. I just think but the fact that it can see this change happening in women. As someone whose goal is to close the gender wage gap.

Pamela Bardhi
I love that more would be like your biggest piece of advice. You kind of already gave us a little nugget earlier. But like your biggest piece of advice for any woman, who is looking to go to the next level. And negotiate or maybe, she’s going in front of an interview right now listening to this podcast. What would you say to her?

Olivia Jaras
But it all starts in your head. Absolutely every single time. If you want to make more money, everybody will be like, Oh. I want to make a million dollars. Oh, I want to make $10 million dollars. And, yeah, that’s the thought. But if your thought is not backed up by belief, you’re never going to get there. So you really, truly need to believe first. And really believe, which is the starting place for every single one of those changes that you want to see in your life. Whether that’s a bigger salary, whether that’s a different career, whether it’s your own business. Like, you know, this yourself. You would have never found yourself in the shoes, you find yourself now. If you didn’t believe first that you were capable of doing this.

Pamela Bardhi
Right. Absolutely, and what I found for me, is writing it down. There’s some sort of magic about writing it down that it sounds so cliche. And everyone’s like, Oh, yeah, write it down, like vision boards. It’s like, literally writing it down in my calendar. Yeah, I have a digital calendar. Like I have a write-up calendar that I write my goals down. And something like it holds me accountable and for some reason for manifestation purposes. It just elevates things to a whole new level. Have you experienced that as well?

Olivia Jaras
Oh, yes. Every year I do a vision board. In fact, like I have it on the other side of my screen, every single year, I update it. And every single year, pretty much everything comes true, which is amazing. But journaling. Absolutely. Like every morning and I know people are like, Oh, that’s so cliche. Do you wake up and journal? I’m like because I know, not only does it help me digest the negative thoughts. And kind of turn them into the kind that makes me a resilient person.

But it allows me to flush out my dreams and my vision for where I want to go. Because again, if it’s just the thought of wanting to be a millionaire. That’s not gonna take you anywhere. But instead, there’s a belief that backs that up. And you start asking yourself and you start exploring the ways in which this could actually happen to you. That changes the game, you show up with confidence.

Pamela Bardhi
Absolutely, writing it down it also breaks it down. It makes all the steps like bro, breaks it down just a little bit. Makes it that much easier. You want a six-figure job, okay. What does that translate into per month, like all these different things? So awesome. That’s amazing. And I would send that to the woman, who’s listening right now. Going into an interview or going to get a new client for business or whatever. Like you said, and also to write it down. And that has to ask you Olivia, based on all the amazingness that you know now. What would your older self tell your younger self?

Olivia Jaras
That women like us were never cut out to be normal. Women who have a gift, things will never be normal. So I started enjoying it.

Pamela Bardhi
I love that so much. And it’s true though growing up, I never fit into the mold like ever and it was like, Oh. I’m going out to get a job, I started working for my parents when I was 10 years old. So I would just be at work helping my parents and even when I was in college. I was going back and forth and helping out at the restaurant. And then I would DJ on the side, like, I’ve never worked like anything corporate.

So it was always weird to me like I could never understand the framework. And like, why I was so outgoing and just not normal and I wish I could go back to my oldest, my younger self, and just roll with it. Stop being like, I want to be like my friends and get jobs and stuff like that. Because that’s what makes you uniquely you.

Olivia Jaras
Right? And furthermore, I mean, normal women don’t change the world. So embrace the fact that you’re not normal in racing, because we’re not cut out to be normal. And that is what I am teaching my kids. What I wish someone would have told me as a younger woman, is that stop trying. You’re never going to be normal and it’s okay. Because women who changed the world were never cut out to be in a mold like they were never cut out to be known. Yeah, time will tell. But if I can tell you fast forward a few years, that’s what I would tell my younger self.

Pamela Bardhi
That’s amazing. I know that’s similar to what I would tell my younger self to I totally, I’m totally with you on that. Oh, man. Olivia, now. What’s next in your world? Like, what are you up to in this day and age? And what’s coming up for you over the next few months, because I know you’re up to amazingness.

Olivia Jaras
We’re on the verge of launching a money mindset course. I’m writing a new book, we’re working, we’re collaborating with that same bank that I worked for years ago. We’re working with them to help women in Latin America kind of get their shit together again, to my team. And I was just on a very determined mission to close the gender wage gap. That’s one of those things that, at some point, was an idea. But now it’s a true belief. Like, kind of like your astrologer says, this is the age of women. We are closing that gap in my lifetime, it’s going to happen.

Pamela Bardhi
I love that. Oh, my God, I love that. And then also like your other programs. How anyone can find you and just an overview of your programs and all the amazingness that you are?

Olivia Jaras
Yeah, I mean, if you need any kind of help just message me on LinkedIn. You can find me on social media as well askatsalarycoaching.com. Like our team inbox where we receive queries of all sorts. And yeah, I mean, I do private coaching, I don’t really have very many slots for that. But we have all sorts of group programs that open every once in a while. We don’t keep things open for very long. Because we want to make sure everybody who we take in, like our power society, is like hell yes.

Like I’ve been waiting to join. It’s kind of like, it’s not an expensive group at all, It’s like 19 bucks to join. But all the women who are in there are diehard women. Who like to be there and want to live absolutely, unapologetically. And not only help themselves but help others grow as well. I can’t wait, cuz you’re coming in a couple of weeks to come and train these ladies. And it’s gonna be so much fun.

Pamela Bardhi
I can’t wait, I can’t either. I’m so passionate about helping women and just helping them own it. Like, it’s like, I’m gonna say it, I’m just gonna say we are so much smarter than men. Okay. I love men. Men are great. Love you guys. But in terms of emotional intelligence and relationship building. There’s no way women are on the forefront of that. And that is why, you know, it was interesting. This past weekend, there was a gentleman and he’s so amazing and he was saying, he’s like. You know, it’s been really interesting to see the pandemic, how women have really come together.

And men have been like, lone wolves. Isn’t that insane? Yeah, I thought about it and I was like, wait a minute. Yes, that’s absolutely correct. Guys have kind of been, like, I haven’t seen them, band, together the way. I’ve seen women band together during this time. And that comes and stems from relationship building. The emotional intelligence in us all coming together. That’s what we do, we’re nurturing, we’re relationship builders. Such an exciting time and to be part of your group is gonna be so much fun. I love women who are just like, Alright, I’m gonna go out there and get it. Let’s do it, let’s all do it together. You know,

Olivia Jaras
Listen to your story, because I’ve had the great fortune now of being interviewed by you and sharing my story. But I can’t wait for you to share your story.

Pamela Bardhi
Oh, my God, I’m so pumped so many amazing things that I’m just thankful for the work that you do in closing that gender wage gap. Which has always been like a huge thing right in society. And now you’re out there doing it. You’re helping 10s of 1000s of women. So I just want to commend you all Oh, yeah. Big time for doing that and just not being afraid and unapologetic and just going out there and be like, No, no, you got this. So thank you for the work that you do. And I’m just honored to have you here today. Just thank you so so much.

Olivia Jaras
Well, thank you so much for having me and I’m just going to return that compliment. That cuz you’re a woman who is leading by example in a male-dominated industry, you’re fucking crushing it. So it’s the both of us hats off to both of us today.

 

Tune in to the episode to hear the rest of my incredible interview with the amazing Olivia Jaras.