Ken Van Liew

Ken Van Liew used to perform close-up magic in restaurants to make extra money so he could afford diapers and formula for his twins. But he got tired of depending on other people and decided to make a change. Ken entered the real-estate game. Ken is the founder and CEO of Global Real Estate Strategies which help guide investors, owners, and developers through complex investments and development projects, and the author of the International Best Selling Book ‘The Modern Wealth Building Formula.’

Ken’s specialties are in:

Regulatory ApprovalsDevelopment & Construction BudgetsFinance & Feasibility AnalysisExecutive Management & Field SupervisionValue Engineering & ProcurementSite SafetyQuality ControlConstruction Claim PreventionFacility & Building Management

Book a 1-on-1 call with Ken: https://go.kenvanliew.com/mwbfvideo-optin

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/kenvanliew/

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Ken Van Liew and His Remarkable Journey in New York Skyline Real Estate Development

Pamela Bardhi
Hello everyone and welcome to another episode of underdog. Today I have an amazing guest here with me. Ken Van Liew. Ken, how are you?

Ken Van Liew
I’m doing awesome. Pamela, how are you?

Pamela Bardhi
I’m pumped to have you here today. Oh my goodness. Is everyone in for a treat with you?

Ken Van Liew
Oh, thank you. I’m always pumped to talk to you no matter what.

Pamela Bardhi
You’re amazing. You have done so much and you have so much coming up. Like you’re always working on something amazing. And I love that over a billion developments, which is insane. You basically changed the New York skyline. I don’t know what else to say, how much more amazing you can get. But here we are. That being said, my number one question is always this. What inspired you on your journey to where you are today? Loaded question. I know.

Ken Van Liew
You know, the funny thing was I was pretty fortunate that our class trips went to New York City. I think it was the Empire State Building. Probably when I was seven years old or something, I just looked at Manhattan and said one day. I have to get involved in real estate, I didn’t know how it was going to get there. But it started at a very young age and after creating a six-year plan in college. And realizing maybe engineering wasn’t the best path for me like I learned how to build buildings. That led into real estate and it was a long journey that could tell you all about.

Pamela Bardhi
I love it. Now he’s asked this question, too, like. What did you want to be when you grew up? So it’s how you answered that, so you literally just walked into the Empire State Building. You’re like, I want to get into real estate one day?

Ken Van Liew
Well, you know. I always wanted to be a sports player, like every other young kid, first a fireman then a policeman. But the tall buildings in New York City were so fascinating. And if you’ve ever been to the Empire State Building and I’m just looking down at everything. I guess the beginning of my top-down thinking years later came to fruition.

Pamela Bardhi
That’s amazing. So you mentioned engineering too, so in high school. You had basically set off to college. And that’s when you studied engineering.

Ken Van Liew
I wanted to be an engineer, but I wasn’t that sharp of a high school student. So I got into a pre-engineering program. And three years into that program, thank God, I met my wife. She’s still with me today’s taking calculus for the third time. I finally jumped the hurdle and three years after that six-year plan. And I received an engineering degree from New Jersey Institute of Technology. What really started to grow that vision that I had when I was seven, I won an award that year in a subdivision.

And I said, Well, Maybe real estate development would be something that I could do one day. But I wasn’t really connecting the dots at that point. You know, I was just one of the graduates, because I think college for so long. I’m like this has to end soon and the funny thing was when I finally graduated civil engineering. I couldn’t pass the test. So I took the test so many times. And by that time, I built myself up in the construction industry. Where I was making more money than I could ever make as an engineer. So my engineering career was probably like six months and then, I just got the license to kind of open the door.

Pamela Bardhi
That’s incredible. Was there anyone in particular, who influenced you to get into the engineering world? Or is that just something that sort of flowed naturally to you?

Ken Van Liew
No great question. Nothing flowed naturally with me. Other than playing football. I was an all-state football player. But when I was 16, my little league coach asked me. If I wanted to work for the Soil Conservation Service In that summer. I found myself working on a major dam rehabilitation and I learned how to test concrete and soil. And it gave me a little light about civil engineering and I was just horrible at math and science. But I like to test soil and concrete and love the idea of learning about roadways and transportation. It was something tangible. Thank goodness, I like something because I wasn’t a great student. And I was too short to be a professional athlete.

Pamela Bardhi
You said, math and science because math and science was like my kryptonite when I went into my undergrad. Because I went in for marketing because I thought I was gonna get a corporate job after I graduated. Then like my whole life is gonna be so altered and amazing, you know? And I took an applied calculator for business class and that class kicked my ass. I was that kid in high school, like algebra, pre-algebra, I could not for the life of me understand. Like, I don’t know what it is about math and science. It’s just like, my brain is just totally the opposite way. Like, I get to sit there, I could do extra credit, I could read the book 17,000 times and I still couldn’t get it.

Ken Van Liew
Now I know why we’re both successful in real estate. Because my guidance counselor made my mom cry. They’re like, you’re gonna take algebra over two years because you’re not smart enough here. Like in ninth and 10th grade, I had to take algebra or torture myself. And I carry that for a while until one day I’m like, Yeah, I think I could do this. But it’s funny because we didn’t allow that to dictate our future. And the good news is real estate’s not as complicated as the math we were trying to figure out back then.

Pamela Bardhi
I used to get so mad, like, I used to tell my teacher, I’m like. She’s like, you’re not gonna have a calculator. Everywhere you go, you need this stuff, remember and I was like, one day. I can almost guarantee you that, no, I will not need this. And we’re gonna have a calculator everywhere we go. So like my high school teacher. Anytime I see her talking to her, I just go like this. Show her my iPhone.

And also, I want to let you know that I have never used algebra and anything that I’ve done, she’s like, stop it. But then there’s things like geometry that I was super good at because it’s logical. The house was just like this a bit. I don’t know. It’s just funny to me, how you mentioned the differences. Because a lot of people that I know are good at numbers in real estate. And I’m just like that.

Ken Van Liew
That’s funny. You know, geometry was a lot easier for me to, I think the whole essence of it. It taught us a certain way to think to get us to where we wanted to go and that was the good news. I mean, I didn’t turn out to be a great engineer, I did get the license. And it’s opened a lot of doors. But it gave me this way of thinking, it’s the problem solving that in real estate construction. What we’re doing today, we have to think on our feet at all times.

Pamela Bardhi
At all times and being in real estate, we both know that. Oh, my goodness. And Ken. What your experience as you were getting into engineering and all this. Was there a specific mentor or somebody who inspired you to sort of go deeper into that journey? In the real estate realm?

Ken Van Liew
Yes, yes. You know, I was fortunate to work for all these big developers. And I kept saying, I guess you just have to be born into the family and I wasn’t the chosen one, I guess. But as I learned about mentors. Because growing up my parents were just, you know, my dad climbed telephone poles. My mom was a banker and they were just going to college. They didn’t really know about mentorship. And when I learned about mentorship, I looked back at my little league coach and Dolf De Ross was a big mentor for me. I remember I was 31 years old and we had twins and I was like. Okay, well, twins, that’s going to be like 50 grand a year for coyotes to start worrying about college. They were just born.

And I remember seeing Dolf speak and I bought all his programs. He saw me carrying all these boxes. He’s like, Hey. What are you up to? I’m like, building that 30 storey building across the water. They’re like, Wow, that’s pretty cool and we ended up being friends. He sent me all his products. And even when I was doing things, I recognized how cool they were, he thought I was really cool, I thought he was really cool. We were still friends today, he spent a week in my house. He’s been a big mentor to make me think bigger, go home, commercial real estate.

And fortunately, I was very lucky to be in New York City and some of my mentors. There was one Lou March who said if you want to be the best in real estate development. You have to go to New York City. Because that’s like, going to play in the all-star game, go play there for 10 years. And you go anywhere in the world and build. So I went in, I was an overachiever. I did over 20 and here I am. Just get to take it a little easier and pay it forward to people, you know.

Pamela Bardhi
Amazing, Ken. So tell me, how you sort of transition from to go into real estate like your first job, if you will, or your first project.

Ken Van Liew
Yeah and 1997 I was kind of at the stage of my move. I had left Bovis and I went to work for a small little GC. It was a Women’s Business owned enterprise, I bought it from five to 40 million yen and I was really excited about that. How to build it and then it was time to move into something else. And I had won the design award and I learned how to build and I was back at my second Master’s. How to finance it and I figured, I could just kind of pull it all together at that time. And I really had a lot of mentors along the way, kind of guiding me in at that stage.

When I opened the company, I had a gentleman by the name of Bob Santa. Who was building a billion-dollar project for him. I’m in Brooklyn, I’m just enamoured by the way. He dressed and how he presented himself and how we manage 500 people and I just really wanted to be like him. And I just started changing my questions and I realized that it wasn’t the mind that was limited. It was the resourcefulness and the questions you asked. So I just started asking people how I could move forward and kept getting guidance. And one thing led to another and it happened so quickly. I don’t know if I told you the story on how I built a $17 million project using other people’s experience and other people’s money. But that was my first deal and it was so fascinating because I was so excited.

The excitement came on so fast. From when I was 18, I had read the Robert Allen book, no money down. But it was just a book that I put on my shelf over 15 years later. I was like, you know, I couldn’t buy a car back then. So I couldn’t comprehend buying a house with no money down. And I didn’t have any money now, so I am at that point. So I said, I’m going to figure out how to do this. But no money down and I had a chance to go plan an outing at a country club. And I was a little guilty and I went to the country club and sure enough, I started daydreaming. I’m like, maybe I could walk to a country club once.

Sure enough, we got it done, found out there’s an executive special, and convinced my wife. Then I used the credit card to join this country club, figuring proximity is going to be powerful. And sure enough, yeah, fourth round of playing golf with a bunch of young hot shots. I’m calculating and this guy’s telling me that 150 men work and the forum pays him 75 and charges 150. And like he’s got a couple bucks in the bank, all I can say is now if he wants to invest in my company and get the first right of refusal for real estate development.

So by the end of the fourth round, he invested 100 grand and said I want to be part of the company. And that led to me raising over $1.7 million at that Country Club and doing a three trontz raise and developing a $17 million project that I did. Prefabricated that we were talking about before we built it in 13 months and never looked back. It was really cool.

Pamela Bardhi
Oh, man, tell me about that project a little bit more, though, because that was super cool. You said it was just like going up? Like clockwork.

Ken Van Liew
Yeah. You know, it started with just who’s ever trying to get started. And that starts with sometimes 500 pounds, you got to pick it up, you know. I was talking to architects and engineers who led me to a dentist. And started telling me about a certificate of need. I didn’t even know what one was to find out that meant you can build, you know. You could put 113 beds in an assisted living facility. It just happened so quick, I remember just writing it down on a piece of paper like a napkin.

So this will be the yelloweye. I’m going to give you $25,000 refundable, contingent upon approval. And I’m going to take your sister, get your con certificate of need and I’m going to get it approved. We’re going to build this thing. Next thing you know, I leave with a piece of paper, a handwritten Li. I took 25 grand and the guy gave it to me from the golf course and I was controlling this site. And it happened so quickly that I really didn’t know how to put the team together. I ended up going downtown. The administrator at the building departments like sir. You’re not allowed to solicit your office because of me. While I’m in there going up, who can I hire as an architect? Who was the attorney? You know, and then I got a little wiser.

And I’m like, Well, I wonder who the former board attorney was. I called the former board attorney and he was like. If you want to get through the board, I’m the guy but you got to hire this planner and that traffic guy and that architect. Or civil engineer and then, I learned about putting dream teams together. And then once I put the dream team together, I cracked my teeth on raising money and being fortunate to Country Club. I used to set up dinners in the President’s room and see who was kind of hanging out and little cliques. Hey, you guys want to come to dinner next Friday.

And next thing I go to Kinko’s back then and I get my vinyl board with charts showing my rate of return. It was really cool to have one of those pointers with the light yet. Like a little laser and it was just safe to make, I was trying not to fake anything. But there was a lot of gaps to fill. When you’re getting started and you don’t have mentors. You don’t have a dad who’s in the business and you didn’t have a head start.

Pamela Bardhi
Oh, I totally feel you and I love your humility with this. That you’re like, I didn’t really know what I was doing. But here I am, I did it anyway, but what I really love that you did. Proximity is so important and it’s something that you and I both did. So for me I hired a coach because I was like, I’m not gonna try to figure this out on my own. There is no way I’m even going to attempt this. And you did the same thing. Interesting enough. You went and you signed up for that country club. Because you were able to be around the people that would invest in which I find so brilliant and so fascinating.

And because to raise 17 million on your first project, that’s huge. I mean, like, I would understand, like, maybe even a million even, that’s hard. But 18, what was the magic secret sauce and making that happen? As for your first project, what I find is like. It’s very hard to get people to invest in you. Or what I’ve seen, because I haven’t tried to do this myself yet. But when somebody doesn’t have a track record. How do you influence that whole thing? Because I know, there’s a lot of people listening, especially in the real estate game, that they’re like. I want to raise money.

Ken Van Liew
You know, the first thing that I think back is that there was just nothing stopping me. And my mindset was, this is only going one way. I remember the day we received the commitment letter and there were about four pages of items. And my partner’s, like, there’s no way we’re going to do that. I remember snatching the paper off the table and storming out of his office and just calling me in my office and going. I’m gonna finish every frickin thing on his list and I’m going to do it by myself, even if I have to do it right, as there’s nothing stopping me.

And I just had that mindset that it’s only going one way and I think that was half the battle. Because there was barricades along the way and not knowing what to do. I had to eat all my pride and just ask questions and I found. How surprising people really want to help you, It was the first six months. I had a lot of payables, because I didn’t have the money committed and people stuck with me. And they believed in me. I’ve always worked my gravitational pole and I’ve been known to be a magician. So, if you could sometimes just kind of rub your fingers together, you can kind of pull the coin out of it sometimes.

Pamela Bardhi
Where did that come from?

Ken Van Liew
I grew up doing magic. So you know, I believe in magic happening at all times. And you don’t necessarily need to know every single thing and be the jack of all trades, master of none. You just stay focused on your outcome and rely on your mentorship. Don’t be afraid to ask and you’ll get what you want.

How Did Ken Get Into Magic

Pamela Bardhi
I love that. Now, you got me interested? How did you get into magic? Or what inspired you to get into magic?

Ken Van Liew
Yeah, yeah. Great, I became a really good close-up magician. You could see that if you can take the coin, it actually vanishes completely right out of your hand. Just got to give a little blood and you could just kind of take it turns into silver dust. You can hear it still, but you could just kind of squeeze it and bring it back like that. But it’s pretty cool. Yeah, when I was young, I saw a magic show at eight years old and by 12, I was in a magic contest. And I got hooked, but that guy did what became my best friend to this day. I became a better magician to him, but he won in a magic contest and I hung out at a magic store to kind of keep you out of trouble for years.

And when I was a kid. My dad would drive me around and I would do between 50 and 75 magic shows every year and most of my magic shows. I would invest back into tricks, I have 300 books and all kinds of magic tricks. And when I got to college, I was a close-up magician. So I would entertain myself in restaurants and just always hustling. I love walking up the table sharing magic, mystifying people and making them laugh. That’s just been fun and then I learned how to grow your money.

Pamela Bardhi
Question, did you pull any of these magical stunts. When you were trying to raise capital for real estate? I’m just wondering,

Ken Van Liew
That’s not a time you want to start showing people tricks. Because you don’t want anybody to think that you’re trying to pull the wool over their eyes. But you know that it’s all integrity. And if you’re trying to get $1, you’re not going to get the $1 it’s kind of a unique approach. If you know what I mean?

Pamela Bardhi
So fascinating. I’m also a big believer in magic, just life is beautiful. Life is magical and it can be as magical as you want it to be. It just depends how much you want to believe in it. That you can make these beautiful things happen and it’s just so funny. I’m seeing the parallels between us and it’s like so dead on both realms. And it’s so cool and I love it so much and I just love your energy and spirit but that’s incredible. 17 million the first deal and then, I mean. I can only imagine that after you mastered that, you know, the future was extremely bright. If you can do 17 million on your first deal I can imagine, you know what was the next project like? And how do you sort of advance?

Ken Van Liew
Yeah, we you know, we went big, we moved on to a large transit village. Which was one of eight in New Jersey at King college and had a hotel component. We went on to a project we did on your 19th in Park Avenue, 240 Park Avenue was beautiful project. Tom Brady came to look at the 10th house. And then we went to1055 Park Avenue with Trevor Davis. Then in 2008, the market crashed. So we came across some tough times, we actually cracked the code back again.

In 2014, I opened a concrete company in New York City, I poured for 25 stories, 130 storey towers, nonunion. Which is pretty cool and then I decided I was working too hard. But yeah, we did, like 300 units between 2015 and 2016 for other developers, and then it was just positioning ourselves. And last year, we bought Larson’s turkey farm and another property in Bridgewater and tried to figure out what’s going to happen in the city. So just the winning thing and I think I mentioned to you the digital monitor wealth-building formula is coming out. One of my goals is just to continue to contribute, pay it forward, and all that kind of good stuff.

Pamela Bardhi
Absolutely. Let’s talk about that a little bit. Because obviously, your experiences are tremendous and incredible. And you’ve got a whole brand that you’re building alongside now, which is super exciting. So tell us a little bit about that.

Ken Van Liew
But the modern wealth-building formula I always say, it takes me a little while to figure it out. Developed the project, I created a program that was called a finger deals with no money down. Because I really didn’t use any of my own money. But the name wasn’t resonating with me. So we turned it into real estate development made easy. And we found that was great, but not everybody could just dive right into real estate. When I looked at it, I was like, this course is just a little intense for your first course.

But, I guess it was this top-down thinking and when someone said, that Ken you really need to break it down for people. Was when it hit me and I was like. Okay well, I found it, I funded it and I facilitated it. That’s where I came up with this fine funding facilitate system. Which is the beginning of the $17 million development. And then I tried it on a commercial acquisition and it worked and a couple years later I was like. Wow, I wonder if this works for residential. I didn’t really know a lot about residential, but people would always say. You don’t need money to do wholesale and I took over a business. Where we were doing hundreds of wholesales. And I realized when you want to scale anything, you need money. So yeah, she could do a lot of wholesalers.

Without money, though, when you have money, it just makes it a lot easier. So we proved it out in a wholesale and that led to kind of us wholesaling stuff to ourselves. And then doing retail, so we created a second stream of revenue and then after I did it. Kind of across the board, I was like, wow, this monitor wealth-building formula is kind of like a blanket. Works for real estate development, it works for wholesale and worked for commercial. Maybe I should try to articulate it and that’s when I started writing the book. So it’s a combination of 20 years of self-development with guys like Tony Robbins and Jack Canfield. Landmark education and doing a lot of self-mastery work as you know, I’m a rabbit hole expert. You know, that was just a blast, I kind of connected the dots.

A little bit of personal development, a little bit of understanding. How relationships are so key and having a strong foundation to house. Having children that get you up early in the morning and keep you up late at night. Living your passion in the career that you really love. And I was like, wow, if I can put this into a book I could reach. I believe millions of people and make their lives a little easier, less friction and all the heavy lifting for them. You know?

Pamela Bardhi
Absolutely. I love that. Now, can you mention a lot about self-development work as well. Because I think your mindset has a lot to do with your success. What’s been your biggest mantra that has kept you so positive? And like, keep that visualization going in your mind and just like to accelerate you to new levels. Because as you’re telling your story, you’re like, there’s so many moments where your mindset. Really stepped in and you’re like, no, there’s no other way, it’s gonna go this way. And there is no other option. So walk me through your thought process a little bit and your mindset.

Ken Van Liew
Yeah, I’m one of the monitors that I said for years was I am integrity, an honest and loving leader. With magical empowering skills to create endless opportunities for all mankind. And I’ve said that a couple 1000 times, I used to be 246 pounds, I weigh 174 today. I started saying that mantra when I left Life Mastery with Tony Robbins in 2000, I was blessed to be with him. When the towers collapsed, I lost my best friend that day in the World Trade Center.

But I came back so empowered and had a chance to stand on top of a telephone pole at 246 pounds. And I wrote down one at a 34-inch waist, I reached that goal, and then this year. I got into some more micro distinctions, I hit 172 and so now I’m just kind of hanging out at 175. And I feel great my metabolic age. He was 38 years old this week and was energetic.

Pamela Bardhi
That’s amazing. So you mentioned the Tony Robbins retreat was a big part.

Ken Van Liew
Yeah, that Tony, I mean, that’s what led me into personal development. I mean, I always believed in my sports. You know, growing up, I was always trying to become better personally in my sports. And I can’t say enough how I believe sports played a huge role in my life. Hopefully, young children get involved in some type of organised sport. Because there’s nothing like having a coach that sees things in you that you can’t see. I didn’t have parents that were worried every day. It was the coaches on the football field going. Hey, man, you can do this, let’s go, let’s go.

Pamela Bardhi
I always talk about the cheerleaders. The cheerleaders plays such a massive role in your life, the people that are just there and it’s like, keep going. Like, their value is so immense, like, there’s no better feeling than to have those cheerleaders. And it was my father, he was like, I’m seven years old, he’s like, Pam. You’re gonna be a leader, you’re not going to depend on any man, you’re gonna make your own money. Don’t even worry about it.

And I remember just being like this and they’re so confused. But as a kid, I just kept repeating it. As I was getting older and older and older. Now I see the effect of his affirmations really stuck in me. Like his cheerleading, for me, has really shaped me out. To be an independent person and do my own thing. But like, it’s crazy. How much those cheerleaders in your life, I call them influence you.

Ken Van Liew
That brought back, the cheerleaders on the football field. They won championships. I just remember those cheerleaders. If it wasn’t for the cheerleaders on the sideline, I don’t think football would be the same. And that’s how life is, you know, that’s a great analogy. Thank you for sharing that. That really resonated with me.

Pamela Bardhi
The AU CAD, no, yeah. And as you were talking, I was like thinking about this, which really is the cheerleaders that make the difference. They bring that energy and when you feel down, they’re just like, no, come back up again. And it sounds like you’ve had quite a few cheerleaders in your life, which is amazing. And Ken, for us, I know. There’s a lot of people listening right now who whether they’re interested in real estate. Or they’re looking to raise funds or they’re entrepreneurs that are looking to raise funds for another business. Like, what would be some of your biggest tips? I guess you could mention one that’s real estate-specific one for just entrepreneurs in general. What would be like your biggest piece of advice?

Ken Van Liew
In the context of raising money? Did you say or?

Pamela Bardhi
Yeah, I mean, I think real estate, the number one hurdle, the money aspect? So I guess, on the real estate specific one, we can talk about.

Ken Van Liew
I think the biggest thing with money is that the story you’re telling yourself in your head isn’t true. There’s a lot of money out there, it’s unlimited funding, truly and people are looking for trustworthy people to invest in. So if you’re not believing that, then you’re preventing the money from coming to you. There is unlimited money and build it and they will come. Yes, most real estate deals will attract the money from an entrepreneurial standpoint. That also applies in any type of raising money or whatever you’re trying to enroll somebody. The key is really understanding what’s important to them and what they really care about. In that process, empower them. Because if you can help them achieve what they want, then you’ll get what you want. And the more people you help, the more success you’ll have.

Pamela Bardhi
And I love that. I love that and also aligning yourself with proximity to which I thought was very important.

Ken Van Liew
Yes, that’s a given. I can’t emphasize that enough, you know. A young kid from Highland Park, with educated parents to be able to get into the president’s room at a country club. And raising $1.7 million is a testament to proximity.

Pamela Bardhi
Amen, the underdog story, which I love so much. Oh, man and what advice would you give to entrepreneurs in general, based on your journey?

Ken Van Liew
All the principles of the modern wealth-building formula apply to entrepreneurship in any type of business. You have to work on the self-mastery process, mastering influence mastery. I did it in a little bit different format, but he has it summarised in 18 items, which it’s really working on yourself. You’re the only person that you can control, you have to control your state, you know. There’s a whole emotional IQ component to it. Life isn’t really balanced. So if you’re sitting there going, I want to create a balanced life there, that’s not going to happen, you’re going to be working like crazy building a family like crazy. You’re always going to be imbalanced. And you just got to understand that’s just part of playing a big game.

At the end of the day, all you’re going to have is your word and reputation. So if you’re playing big games, you can’t keep your word, you clean it up. And you just always do the next best thing. I help people as much as I can, you know, sometimes I help a little bit too much. Sometimes, people, you want to help them more than they can help yourself. But just stay true to your values and honor your word. And stay focused on the time block, you know. What you want in five years, reverse engineer on what you should be doing today. So you can accomplish what you want in five years and keep it simple.

Pamela Bardhi
Amen. And now the burning question which I always ask. What would your older self tell your younger self? Based on what you know, now.

Ken Van Liew
Onwards the hours just worrying, you know, worrying up late at night and working too many Sundays. I’ve worked way too much. And I realize that sometimes journaling and going into critical thinking like now. I got a little bit older in life, I get so much done. Just by spending that little bit of quiet time thinking like, I got to work, go to work. So, you know, just stop it, take a step back. We’re all in the woods, in the weeds, you got to step out and look at the forest and look at the big picture. And envision yourself as a drone flying over and you’re kind of seeing what’s going on. Because sometimes we get fogged and distorted and, and it happens quickly.

Pamela Bardhi
It really does, it really really does. Because sometimes you get so deep in it, that you’re just like you’ve come on a machine. And it’s hard to kind of pull yourself out of routine. I find myself struggling with that. Sometimes I’m like, I need to journal, I need to sit down. But that is just like, boom, boom, boom, all the projects happening. I’m like, running around like a crazy person, so what happens but like you said time block is key. So you never forget about yourself. That’s amazing. And Ken Now you mentioned your book. Now, what else is new in your world? What’s coming up next for you?

Ken Van Liew
Our modern wealth-building formula digital prop program. Is hitting the market in a couple of weeks and I am really excited about that. Dolf de Ross and I are planning on creating something with real estate riches and modern wealth. We don’t know exactly how that looks yet. We’re doing some huge things with unblinded and creating a real estate unblinded entity. Which should be really exciting, we have stuff going on with Kris Krohn. We have developments in New Jersey and throughout the country, so it’s just fun. And my daughters are getting married. My son just got orders to become a reconnaissance officer, which is the Navy SEALs of the US Marines. I love them to death, I pray for them every single day.

Pamela Bardhi
Amazing Ken, oh my god that all sounds absolutely incredible. And now with that being said. Where can everybody find you and your awesomeness? So they can keep track of all this wonder that you’re creating?

Ken Van Liew
kenvanliew.com, get my phone number there. There’s a strategy session if you hit the discover how button you can get the book for free. Just come online with some goodies and join the crew and have some fun.

 

Tune in to the episode to hear the rest of my incredible interview with the amazing Ken Van Liew.