Natalie Elisha G.

Natalie Elisha Goldberg – who often goes by Natalie Elisha Gold is a proud mother, wife, and attorney. Not only these, she is also a best-selling author, a nationwide speaker about women and money, and a fearless cheerleader for her client’s success, the founder of Goldberg LLP, and the Podcast Host of The Gold Standard. She has made it her life mission to help people like you protect their hard-earned life savings, property, and their future.

Natalie founded Goldberg LLP to bring the power of estate planning law to you! Natalie focuses her legal practice on high net worth and ultra-high net worth families.

Natalie’s team works closely with all families and even established a company Life, Legacy Legal that provides top-notch planning for the masses!

Contact Natalie to learn more:

Website:https://www.goldbergllp.com/about-us

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/natalieelishagold/

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/goldlegalgroup

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/natalieelishagold/

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Celebrity Wealth Attorney in Manhattan by 24 Natalie Elisha G. Shares her Gold Success Recipe

Pamela Bardhi
Hello, everyone, and welcome to another episode of underdog. Today I have an awesome guest here with me, Natalie, how are you?

Natalie Elisha G.
Hey, Pam, I’m great. How are you?

Pamela Bardhi
I am doing lovely. So, Natalie, you’re a total rock star. I’ve seen it. I witnessed it. You’re a baller and I love that. Now, a question for you. And this is the most loaded question of all time. But I always start with this is, what inspired you on your journey to where you are today?

Natalie Elisha G.
Super great question and easy question for me to answer. It is my story at 15 Pam. I was walking across the street, two guys were racing their cars at 60 miles an hour. From light to light to show whose ego was bigger. And unfortunately, one hit me as a pedestrian 60 miles an hour, the entire left side of my body was completely crushed. I have multiple pieces of metal to this day, which you would never know. No one would ever know. But it’s real.

And those scars and that experience really was a second chance at life at 15 years old. When you have that, I mean like, cares about everything out. You have a chance to live. Each and every one of us has this we’re alive. We have such a small statistical opportunity to actually be the sperm that I’ve got the A and B here. What a blessing it is and so often we come in and we forget. And we think we have unlimited time. Nothing’s unlimited. We need to live right now.

Pamela Bardhi
Right? Oh my God, thank you so much for sharing that. I’m so sorry, that happened to you now, like, what was that recovery process? Like at that time, because you’re 15 years old. You’re just a teenager trying to live your life.

Natalie Elisha G.
You know it’s funny, I don’t think I was ever really a kid. I feel like I came out like a little adult that just had to grow into my body. The doctor told me we can’t believe you survived. And you’re going to have to take 10th grade off in a go, Doc. I’m alive, I go to the number one school in New York. And not because mommy and daddy have silver spoons in my mouth but because I was a hard worker. School was my thing.

I was amazing at it, thank god and they worked very hard, I was like. If I miss one day, I’m going to be behind my peers. I’m not going to do that and it was August 28 that the accident happened. Believe me, I was in school the first day in the wheelchair. And within a month and a half. They said I’m not going to walk for a year. Within a month and a half. I’m dancing and choreographing on stage.

Pamela Bardhi
Hold on a second hold on. They told you you weren’t gonna walk for a year and you were dancing in a month and a half.

Natalie Elisha G.
You know what, when there’s a will, there’s a way.

Pamela Bardhi
So walk me through your badass mentality that you have because that is not normal. Because nobody’s a lot of people right? When they have news like that brought to them. They’re like, something will get crushed and they don’t know what I mean? Like, how did you battle those thoughts? And like, how did you motivate yourself to be like, No, I’m doing this.

Natalie Elisha G.
I really felt like it was like, Holy moly, I am meant for something huge. God willing, I survive, I’m alive. Like I’m going to take advantage of every part. And they also didn’t want people feeling bad for me. You know, I was like, you know what, like, how strong am I? And how tough Am I that I was able to survive that? You’re telling me this little 15-year-old punk is gonna keep me down from doing what I want to do, because what he might think? No way and how often can people get crushed? They get crushed by he didn’t like me or she said this to me. Or this person didn’t like my facebook or instagram or LinkedIn posts. Who the EFF cares.

Pamela Bardhi
Amen to that. That’s another thing you know, is that so many people get so wrapped up into what everyone else thinks of them and their own insecurities. It’s like, pay attention to you like you’re alive. You’re breathing Like what?

Natalie Elisha G.
And Pam, let’s be real. How much time we have on our days and we are doing much out there love to empower others. We’re doing big things. How much of our days are we spending? Thank you. Other people? Very little, very little about a pen yet if ever. Everyone is holding themselves back about what they are going to think? Trust me, they’re not thinking about you. They’re only thinking about themselves.

Pamela Bardhi
Yep, I always say that people are so wrapped up in their own insecurities. I guarantee you that what you think that they’re thinking is not happening right now. Like, not caring at all,

Natalie Elisha G.
We were so lucky as all the people will only think about us all the time. Right?

Pamela Bardhi
Right, no, but I respect your mentality so much. And like, you know, at that time to be able to rise up and to the challenge and just be like. Listen, I’m alive, I’m gonna do this, I survived, I’m gonna keep going against all odds, which is crazy, amazing. But like to be that you’re gonna have that mindset so it is literally gold, just like your last name, literally. Because as a teenager, especially, you know, going through something like that and then just being able to rise up again. And so what were the doctor’s reactions, when you started dancing and choreographing to get.

Natalie Elisha G.
My PT was in shock, and you know, what did it look like? They’re like, the fact that you can do this literally, this our move because my elbows badly shattered. America, you know what? The human body is the miracle, the fact that all the pieces have to work and they do. Whoa. And here’s the thing, you know, truthfully, it was, to me, the biggest gift and the biggest wake-up call. Because how many of us? Like, yeah, I went to Harvard. And I’m special because I went to Harvard.

Or I went to a community college. So I must not be able to do that much. Who told you these lies? It’s beyond like, to me, it’s all about how do we uplift and lift humanity into the light. To realize that your degree name is not you? You determine what you do. And believe me, no one cares where you went to school. It gets you your first job. That’s it, it opens the door to a network. But how many kids go to college and sit in their dorm room all the time? And don’t network? The heck are you wasting this opportunity for?

Pamela Bardhi
Yeah, absolutely. And now you as you sort of shifted from high school into college what was your career trajectory, like, and just take your life experience past that point.

Natalie Elisha G.
So I went to the 10 state schools in New York, which is like an amazing state school top-ranked. And I came from a very working-class, middle-class family. So for me, it was basically a nearly free education. And then I did College in two years, double major in two years. Very good planning, so I do trust and state for a living, I plan people’s wealth and livelihood, literally, like, it’s what I do. I was just 17 years old and I was like, well, these are the type A classes I want to take, and they’re filled. Here’s B and here’s C.

And I walked into the guidance counselor, wherever they call the career counselor when you first get them onto college campus and I’m like. Here’s the different options for the scheduling I’m going to do and I already have 27 credits walking in their head was spinning. We’ve never seen someone do this before. What do you mean, you’ve never seen someone do this before? Why are we then letting other people define how in other life, it’s available online for you? You check and you do it and I was able to do College in two years as a result. And then I went to law school. Thank God everywhere I applied, I got a full scholarship and that’s when I became a lawyer. 23 years old, in New York City.

Pamela Bardhi
Oh, my God, look at you, oh, how was that experience becoming an attorney? You know, just coming out of school. I know that a lot of people probably go down the corporate route. And then eventually they open up their own firms and what was that experience like for you?

Natalie Elisha G.
Oh, my God. So I worked for a family office, essentially a real estate family in New York and house first. And then I went to a trust and seat firm and I realized like. You are basically a cog in someone else’s wheel, and you’re making them the money. So I’m like, Okay, what does my boss have, she is very well-spoken. She’s charming and she knows how to explain to a person, very simply. What they need to do in order to protect themselves and get herself paid. That’s not that hard to learn.

We go through how many schools and how much stuff in our life. And we can’t figure out how to do a 10-minute pitch that this person does. Everyone thinks this person is so much smarter than me. This person is so much more than your opportunity, this person you count yourself out. That’s it, so it’s like if you just say yes, I can be 24. I have my own shingle. This is no connection, no nothing, I literally with my seven-inch heels, you know, I’m not I’m like five one match.

So with my seven-inch heels, I would be up and down different networking groups in Manhattan. And I’m very proud to say I have fallen in Manhattan a number of times with those heels. Okay, with the uneven streets. You get back up and you go and you make yourself a name. And the fact is, was I told that I’m so young and so? Oh, you’re crazy. What’s crazy? That I’m young and I’m gonna make it and I’m gonna kick your ass all dude. Okay? Yeah.

Pamela Bardhi
You go girl at 24 years old, you’re the seven-inch heels just walking through these networking groups. Is that exactly what they told you, like.

Natalie Elisha G.
All right, who are threatened? But many more were so gracious, so loving, and took me on as a friend, a daughter, a niece kind of a thing. And the fact is, it’s really funny. People think, you know, they’re at a big firm and they’re miserable. Not everybody. A lot of people. They’re thinking, How do I exit this, but I’m making this money and I have these student loans. Student loans keep you in place because they are your constant payment that you can’t get out of no matter what. So I would say the biggest thing is don’t take those off. Because then you’re not stuck in anything. Even like it, you could be like, okay, I’ve saved up enough that I can go live my life.

And here’s the crazy thing. My friend, I run a women’s networking group, which I believe you have come to Pam or will. Yes and there’s something profound that happened and one of the women said to us. We were talking about the money we were presenting, she said. I asked my financial advisor, how much money do I need? If I wasn’t going to bring in any money to survive for six months? And she goes, that number was not a lot of money and when that’s your reality, like. You can do anything for six months, if you have that six-month ness that you feel like, I’ll be okay. What’s to stop us from starting anything? Give me six months, you know?

Pamela Bardhi
Amen, Amen, so you’re 24 years old and Boss Lady. So you just decided, like, Hey, I’m gonna open up my own firm. And so before we get into that, like, what did you want to be when you grew up? I’m just wondering.

Natalie Elisha G.
First, I wanted to be a teacher, when I was a little kid and I think it’s. Because I had great teachers who really saw the strength in me and gave me that confidence to go on in life and be who I am. And as soon as I mean, like, from 10 years old on I want to be a lawyer. But the fact is, like, no one actually knows or being a lawyer means.

Pamela Bardhi
What does it mean? Because I know everyone has different perceptions of what that means.

Natalie Elisha G.
So I’m like, No, no, it’s not that that’s what I thought it was. I thought it was like suits, Perry Mason, watch out, I’m gonna be closing trial day. 98% of cases get settled before trial. People say they’re litigators. They may not have ever litigated a case. It’s what’s called motion practice, which is the paperwork and sometimes oral argument. That goes in front of a judge to get a case through certain milestones. To get heard in front of a judge could take five to seven years. So when I originally became a lawyer, thinking. I’m going to bring justice to this world and be the voice. What kind of voice, are you going to be if you can’t say anything for seven years?

But then I realized. You know what, and then I also saw, like, who was killing it, at last, I mean, in college it was literally cakewalk and I went to an amazing school. I was partying, five, six nights a week. People thought I was like failing out of school, I was on strike for four points now. It was insane and I literally was like, Okay, this is great. Because I can just memorize the stuff, regurgitated that Boom, boom, boom done. In law school, I took a year off between law school and college because I graduated early. I hadn’t planned to take the outset. So I go to law school. I’m 21 years old, super skinny, super blonde, super tan and I’m like, it’s all what’s Baby, I’m here.

And all of a sudden, all the people it’s 2010, all the people who had like been laid off jobs. Because of the financial crash and oh 809 and then, we decided they’re gonna go back to law school and they’re 30 years old. And they have all this real-world experience. They’re not raising their hands, they’re not fighting for justice in the classes, they’re sitting there. What I call silent but deadly In the back, you never even heard this guy’s name. You don’t know who the hell he is. He’s in your law school class. Then you find out he Cali which is like at the highest grade in Class the class. Are you kidding me? And I’m like, but aren’t lawyers supposed to advocate?

Aren’t we supposed to be mouthpieces for those who cannot speak? And that’s actually not what I found in law school. So I wanted to quit law school. I said, screw this, this sucks. And my mom said that, even if you never practice the day in your life, finish the degree, I had a full scholarship, why not? You know, it’s a gift from God. Go and get this. So eventually, you know, my second year I learned tricks. My first year, I was reading every case I was like and then, I’m like. These people, no one cares what you do in the class. It’s all about the final exam, It’s a one-shot wonder.

The final determines your grade. So I’m like, why should I even waste my time, I just couldn’t study for the final. And all of a sudden, my B’s and B pluses, which I’d never seen a curve in my grade before and those days. So I thought these B’s and B pluses are doubting myself, am I worthy? Am I capable and then all of a sudden, I was getting A’s and I got the highest grade ever on negotiation? Because in the second and third year, I was able to take the courses that really spoke to who I’m good at, which is advocacy and negotiation. Really being what we think of as a lawyer, which 99% of lawyers are not too crazy about.

Pamela Bardhi
That is so crazy. Yeah, the advocacy piece, too, because I have a cousin in law school right now, too. She’s like my little sister and she’s like, she was the same exact way, she’s in law school and she’s in our third year. And she’s like, this is nothing like what I expected. She’s like, I was gonna go in and do this as a kid, trial litigation and stuff and she’s like. This is not what is at all. Now she’s starting to get into more advanced classes like her. So it was rough. But yeah, our third year, she’s like, loving it.

Natalie Elisha G.
And yeah. That’s what they do. You know, it’s like, this is my big issue with colleges and law schools. Why is it that the professors that are teaching those courses for the most part, except for advanced years, have never worked? As a practitioner? I mean, think about it, we want more kids to get more jobs. Wouldn’t it make sense that we actually tell them? What kind of job they’re gonna be walking into and what it actually entail?

Furthermore, as you and I have networked on LinkedIn and we know, it’s all about who, you know. Wouldn’t it make sense to the people who are teaching these students. Should be able to call and say, Pam, I got this amazing person for you star in my class. You got to hire her, how much further would that go than going to OCI. Or we’re hiring blah, blah, blah, you know, here’s my resume, smell it. It’s pink. And it smells good. You know, come on.

Pamela Bardhi
I know the educational systems are so far behind. It’s like, there’s theory and then there’s practice. And it’s like what is actually practical. Like you just said, it’s just not really like, it’s great to know theory. But in the real world, that practical knowledge is what you need to really advance yourself forward and network building that network. Why were we not trained to just network, like you said?

Natalie Elisha G.
And Pam, you know what, to the confidence killer. That is giving someone who’s straight a nose or working hard. Or putting more effort and love into it and giving them a B or B plus and giving the schmo in the back. We don’t even know their name, the A what it does to those, who are really the leaders. It is such a confidence killer. It’s unbelievable. So for anyone watching this, like you are worthy, just because some professor didn’t read your name. And you were just a number on a test and you got to be, doesn’t mean you’re be.

Pamela Bardhi
Absolutely. Oh, God, absolutely. And the educational system is such garbage. Sometimes there’s such great things, but it’s like holding themselves to the standards, like yeah. You could be the smartest kid Ivy League kid. And if you don’t know how to go out there and network. That degree means nothing.

Natalie Elisha G.
And also, but let’s look, for example, I literally didn’t study for the LSAT. I learned my lesson and I did very well, but I didn’t get a 1600 but here’s the thing. The parents and lineage which my parents are immigrants didn’t know you know what to tell me. I did everything on my own, the lineage that is the Ivy League. You’re learning for the SCT from the time you’re 12 years old. You have private tutors teaching you math at the time, you’re six years old. And I look like I deal with all wealthy people.

All my clients are very wealthy. That’s why they need me. Do you know, how do we save more money? How do we create a legacy of all these great things, but the fact is that I think we have to come to terms where it’s really not the same playing field. But you can’t also teach that hustle and that hunger that I heard someone once I. Which was very funny to me, I said. What do you want for your kids? He goes, I want them to be a Ph.D., poor, hungry, and determined.

Pamela Bardhi
But you can’t buy that, right, that’s like practical stuff. Like that’s what I mean. You could have an IV, you’d have perfect scores in school. If you don’t know how to network and be a team player, you’re not going anywhere far anywhere, for those matter. Like, okay, you look great on paper, but like, in reality, what does this actually mean for you?

Natalie Elisha G.
And it’s like, just if your boss or if your dad has actually made the money. Is kind of mean and nasty to other people, not to say many of my clients. Were the wealthiest or the nicest, most generous sweetest people on planet Earth. God bless them. I have met some people who think that they are exempt from being kind. Because of what they perceive they have done and by the way. Those people are probably the fakers because anyone with true wealth. It’s not just money, it’s the wealth of human beings’ wealth of experience. They’re usually fabulous people too.

I’ll give you one example. Merrill Lynch asked me to speak at one of their seminars that they put on as the attorney expert. So I’m not going to go into specific, very nitty-gritty things. You talk on a more general level, you don’t necessarily know who’s in the room. You can’t be talking about, the tax strategy and the IRS code. Because the person who doesn’t have the base will not understand what the hell you’re saying. So this one guy in the crowd starts heckling me basically being like, well, that’s an oversimplification. No shit, Sherlock.

The masses that are here and then, his lowly associate comes up to me at the end and says to me. You should listen to him, he might teach you a thing or two. And I’m the 25-year-old woman who was the one asked to speak at this event and built myself after the end. This is what if I said, How dare you? And the guy looked like he was this small and I just completely said, How dare you? Do you understand that what your boss was saying was completely wrong. So don’t act like that ever. Because people remember that and they will always remember how you made them feel.

Pamela Bardhi
Amen. And now, you’re just such a total rock star by, like, all trades. So you’re 24 years old, you launched your own firm. And then like by 25 years speaking on a Merrill Lynch stage, like a company event sponsored by Merrill Lynch. So walk me through your life, how did you build your brand and your business. Because you’re just such a freakin rock star, it’s just so inspiring. Especially if you’re in one of the toughest markets, you’re in New York City and you’re young,

Natalie Elisha G.
There’s 100 guys on my floor, but Dan, way longer than me, is in the same practice area.

Pamela Bardhi
Yes, that’s what I mean. Walk me through that

Natalie Elisha G.
It’s all about the network, it’s all about how I joined these groups. I became a leader in these groups, you own things, I mean, it’s such a waste of time. If you’re just gonna go check-in, check out and say, give me business, it’s never gonna happen. It is about how I can connect these people. How can I make it better for those people, how can I give value here and look at 24 25? What the hell do you know? But you know enough that you can come, be a light in every room, shine and help other people. When you do that, they will help you and you know, at first Pam. I was telling people what to do with these top guys out in Nevada.

And they’re so smart and shining the light on them and I closed zero of that business. When I was like, I’m gonna do this for you. Here’s what I can do with almost no brainer, that person would become a client of mine. Take ourselves out, we diminish ourselves thinking that experience is everything. I will tell you I work with 80-year-old attorneys, who’ve been doing the same shitty job for 50 years experience. Is important but it’s about the right experience. And caring enough to keep your finger on the pulse and to know and being like Pam. I don’t know the answer actually. But I will find out for you and I’m going to make sure that we’re going to protect you. That’s sincere and real.

Pamela Bardhi
Right. So have you seen a shift in sort of the attorney space? Because like now especially with all these different online software things, you know. People can get these templates and like all these things, like how have you seen sort of like a dramatic shift. Because I’ve heard attorneys in my space in the real estate space. Be like everything has changed so dramatically. You millennials don’t want to pay for anything. Like all these guys are funny.

Natalie Elisha G.
Most of my clients are actually much much older than I am. A are in their 60s 70s 80s Interestingly, I love what Legal Zoom did for the legal economy. Because it’s making it more accessible, so attorneys think while they’re taking my clients. No, that’s actually false, because 64% of people died without a will, still currently. So it is actually dealing with that market that otherwise, would not have gone to a lawyer, would have died with nothing. The problem with the Legal Zoom is that the document is not the issue, the gap between great documents. It’s about human error.

So you take home that document, you don’t know how to properly execute it. And because you didn’t properly execute and now it’s too late. Because the person only needs the documents, we do when they’re dead. It’s taken to a surrogate’s court, right to be like, here’s the will, but it wasn’t properly signed. So the surrogate’s court is rejecting that issue, its emphasis with or without attorneys. When we talk about trust, trust is the container. But things have to go into the container, which we call funding the trust.

That’s what it’s called, most people don’t do the steps. Because their attorney goes in their beautiful binder and says go fund your trust. Here’s the directions. Human beings are like, Oh, yeah, I’m done. That’s where the work just began, what we did was establish the container for you. You got to go put stuff in it so that it falls apart when you allow it to just be because then they’re done. They forget about it, right? In our firm, we check-up. Have you know, like, let’s help you fund it. Let’s make sure that’s where it’s important.

Pamela Bardhi
Right. So accountability is really key and like those legal zooms aren’t going to provide that experience. And that’s all accountability.

Natalie Elisha G.
It’s an amazing tool in a very transactional market, which legal services traditionally have been. But it’s not the advice. It is just the document.

Who Is Natalie’s Inspiration When She Was Growing Up

Pamela Bardhi
Wow, that’s super interesting. And now, when you were growing up or who has inspired you the most, like, has there been a specific mentor or people that have really inspired you?

Natalie Elisha G.
That is a very tough question for me. Nothing really comes to mind so much for that and I know that’s a contrary. Everyone’s like, Oh, I have this great mentality and I’m like, not so much. I learned a lot of what not to do and I come from a family. That were Georgian Jews who immigrated here. So I come from very hard-working people, I also saw, like my dad, super hard-working, drove a limousine for many years. How hard that industry was impacted by the Ubers of the world and etcetera. And how that all changed and how, you know, my mom, she started, like, as a part-time teller in a bank. Then work yourself up like top manager there.

And really, she used to like charm and her, you know, people skills, so I’m like. With hard work and people skills, you can do anything. So you might as well marry the two in a good combination. Because my time right, as a lawyer, it’s not like. Decree it’s worth so much more than like this socially. We are more accustomed to paying way higher for legal services than we are for many other things. So it’s maximizing that time and being smart. I mean, there’s a lot of lawyers out there who have no idea about the business. And they think I’m just such a great lawyer. Well, how does anybody know?

Pamela Bardhi
Well, so your family plays a huge role and that hard work because I’m like. Your drive is just like crazy, amazing and if you come from like it has, that drive comes from somewhere. Because it’s so remarkable, like your house, I mean, I come from Albania. And I’ve seen my parents build ground up. So it’s like, everything that I’ve dedicated myself to is to make sure that they never have to worry about a bill ever again. That was my driving forces still is my driving force, you know. To make sure that they’re good and then now it’s become much more. But it’s something about being like coming from an immigrant family. That you just, like, it’s just a whole nother level of like responsibility that you feel

Natalie Elisha G.
Well, because our family didn’t know about wills and trust and legacy and they didn’t have that. They had to come here with nothing and make something of themselves back against the wall. So it’s also like what a blessing right to have that hunger to want more. And the truth is, you don’t have kids yet, but God Willing soon and I have two little ones. Thank God that my kids are not going to have the same thing. It’s a double-edged sword like everything else. You want that hustle, you want that drive, you want that go get it and at the same time. What the hell are we getting it for except to make it easier for the next generation.

And then we think about the next generation, all they don’t have that hustle, no shit, I mean. It’s just but they have their own things and their own, like. You know, okay, what do I do with this? I don’t have to necessarily work hard. So what am I going to choose to do with this? Which in and of itself? I mean, like, do you know how many people are millionaires and billionaires. And their kids or god forbid are addicted to drugs? Sometimes they don’t know, how to reconcile with the fact that there was so much available.

And it’s that line that we have to walk and figure out, like. How do you make kids who are going to be inheriting still be humble, be gracious, be generous, work hard? Have passion to do good things in the world, It’s a slippery slope, It’s not easy. It’s not what people think I’ll just write my will to write my trust. Boom, boom, boom, dun, dun, dun. It’s really thinking, like, what happens in the second generation? The third generation, the fourth generation? How am I going to make this wealth actually create legacy?

Pamela Bardhi
Right, exactly. Oh, man. And that’s the hardest thing to think about, right. As a generation next, like what’s coming and how to preserve that. And, oh, man, there’s a whole slew of things, post little things but I love what you’re getting at is like, you know. How do you protect that legacy and keep it going throughout generations and not just the next one?

Natalie Elisha G.
And you know, what’s funny, Pam. When you said about making sure that my family never has to worry about a bill, I very much had that. Are you the oldest in your family, oldest child, we take that on and especially in backgrounds or you know. Your Albanian, I’m Georgian, where the male figure very much kind of rocks the strength now. And I’m the oldest of four girls, so you take that on and you want, to take care of it and you want to. So I like when I first started making my money, I would buy my mom, my sister, my two little sisters. Chanel, Chanel, Gucci, Gucci, my grandma, you know, like, because it’s like the immigrant mentality.

Like, let me show you that I have money. Let me show you that. I’ve made it. Hmm. And the fact is everyone has real money, believe me. They’re not spending like that. they’re like, how much can I save here? What can I do? Percent? They are the people you think are bad ladies, they have the most money. Yep. So it’s also that fine line of how do I enjoy the fruits of my labor? Yeah. And at the same time, that is everything that I need away? Yep. We’re always you know, it’s a point. Oh, 2%, It’s that little here and there, right. It’s not so black and white.

Pamela Bardhi
Absolutely, absolutely. And it’s hard because like when you’re successful, you just want to ball out. You’re like, Yeah, let’s go like.

Natalie Elisha G.
You made it and you’re so proud of yourself. And you want people to know now I’m like, I don’t want anyone to know anything. I don’t want anyone to know where the fuck I live, I don’t want to know anything about me. Because the truth is like, what I do is asset protection, because the people who know that, you have you’re the first target.

Pamela Bardhi
Mm-hmm. Yep. You just want to hide. Shell companies? I’m way back here. You don’t know me. Oh my gosh, I’d like for you what would be some of your biggest tips to any attorneys out there? Any entrepreneurs, anyone that you could speak to and just say hey, here’s Natalie’s tips.

Natalie Elisha G.
Okay, number one, you have to have a basic plan. You got to know where you’re going if you’re going to get there, okay. That base plan has to have the foundation of the house that is built very strong. My real estate sister Pam, will tell you the foundations, the most important part, what does that foundation entail? Will you trust your power of attorney, your health care proxy? Must, must, must, okay, you become an entrepreneur, guess what, if you’re the boss, people are going to sue you. Unfortunately, reality. So for the lawyers out there, Come on, guys, let’s be better. But okay.

There’s a lot of people, a lot of student loans. They take on ridiculous cases so that they can make a little bit of money. I understand. That means for all of us entrepreneurs, you better be protecting your money. And that means structuring your companies and your personal wealth in a way that nobody can ever take it ethically. That is by doing certain kinds of LLC. These companies structuring umbrella insurances, no policies, as well as asset protection trusts are allowed in 19 states. What’s the difference between asset protection trust and every other kind of trust? While you’re allowed to be the person who’s establishing it?

Well, we call the grantor, the trustee, the person in control, and the beneficiary the person benefiting from it. It’s like you own it, but no one could take it from you so much better. And then look, if you’re making real money, okay? There’s Warren wealth in this country, that’s very, very real. Unfortunately, the two-party system has led it to be that Republicans are all about the money and democrats are all about not the money. Which is ridiculous, you know, many very wealthy democrats I work with Come on. But okay, talking points in the world. You better understand that no one’s going to watch out for you and your money except for you.

So you have to understand the tax implications and how to benefit yourself, because the taxes that you save today, compounded could literally be millions of dollars to the next generation and for yourself. Okay, so don’t be cheap. When it comes to going to getting structured if it cost you 50, or $100,000. For you save 10 million, you must be stupid if you don’t choose to save the 10 million. And the last tip is live in love, like, do what you love, be with the people you love.

And don’t we so often create these companies that we as women, especially wear the crown in and we have these shackles on our feet, you get to decide how you’re going to live your life. And if that means you work Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, and the rest of the days your kids do it companies, you want to hire more women, you want to figure out how to stop this so-called street session, which has been the worst thing to happen to women since like the 1970s. Let me give you a tip, pay for her frickin daycare and see how women rise up in your business.

Take leadership roles, kill it beyond control, the PR benefits are going to be outrageous. And by the way government if you want to incentivize people to keep women on giving them a tax incentive for doing so. Not so crazy, very doable. I mean, just common sense things, right? And we cannot say like, the government is gonna take care of me. Gonna take care of you. If you’re not willing to look at educate yourself on what you can do to live a better life. Shame on you,

Pamela Bardhi
Oh, my God, there. Yeah, there’s so much happening with COVID. And everything women were the most hit. Far, you know, and it’s still like recuperating. All that is I’m reading the stats, I just like want to vomit. So I’m just like, Oh, my God.

Natalie Elisha G.
People are so perplexed. How could this happen? Well, because you don’t understand that a woman has to do everything she takes it takes care of the roads and takes care of the kids also is working has all the emotional labor and guilt around that. Because no matter what you do as a mommy can’t win, oh, you’re back to work? Or Oh, you’re not going back? What did you get this education for?

Pamela Bardhi
Right?

Natalie Elisha G.
Tell me what three things I can do that are kosher in your mind. I mean, seriously, you can’t win. And then not just that. It’s like, let’s say you do put your kids in daycare or get a nanny? Well, you’re the one interviewing them. You’re the one calling references. You’re the one making sure that when people come over, there’s not things in the sink. How much can we do? We’re human too. And we deserve respect. And we deserve to love ourselves. Because only from a full cup Can we give?

Pamela Bardhi
Absolutely. Amen. I adore that. And now Natalie, this is my favorite question. You kind of hit a little bit on it now. But what would your older self tell your younger self based on what you know now,

Natalie Elisha G.
Girl, kick that ass. Don’t take any prisoners. Just go.

Pamela Bardhi
Keep going. I love that I love that.

Natalie Elisha G.
It’s crazy. We can do anything, anything. Like if we put our mind to it. As my husband pizza has had, like, didn’t say come in.

Pamela Bardhi
That’s okay.

Natalie Elisha G.
You know this, if we put our mind to it, we can do it. We stopped ourselves. Do not let yourself be stopped by that voice that was put inside your head by someone else. Because you were born as love and you deserve to feel love and be loved. So don’t let the insecurities of your mother or your father or your grandparents or that teacher or that bully or that person who still hates the fact that he’s doing the same thing for the last 50 years. Dim your light shine on sister shine on.

Pamela Bardhi
Amen. I love that. Now you’re a rock star. You’re a rock star. So like what are you up to in the world now because I know you’ve got so much going on. So I’m pumped to hear all about what you’re up to now in the next year.

Natalie Elisha G.
So thank God and raising my girls and I have a growing firm so we are now in about 12 states. That’s been really really fun. I do quite a bit of TV and speaking as an expert in my field and I run this amazing when It’s networking group with my co-founder, Ashley black. There. It is super awesome women from coast to coast. You know what, I want to do a mega women’s conference in the next six months. Pam, what do you say?

Pamela Bardhi
I’m all for that, all for that.

Natalie Elisha G.
And it’s really been a tough time to be apart from people. Yes. So we’re excited about that. And I’ve written a number of books. Yeah, I want you know, I realized I said, Why are people who are becoming moms, right, who should want to learn about the basics to protect our kids, and they’re really not that interested. And I’m thinking, What’s going up?

And then I thought about every great change in this country’s history, every country’s history has been because you educate the children around it. Good and bad, love and hate. So I’m like, Okay, what if we started educating kids around money topics, and confidence and success and what that means? I think we could really make change in the world. So I’m like, Okay, my next series of books will be children’s books around money. And compounding interest.

Pamela Bardhi
Oh, I love that. Oh my god. That’s so Rockstar does it starts young. Then if you can influence them young you’ll change their mindset.

Natalie Elisha G.
Because you know what? They don’t have their stuff mindset yet.

Pamela Bardhi
Yep. There’s still four adults. We’re stuck. Oh my god. I love that. I can’t wait to see those children’s books.

Natalie Elisha G.
Thank you. I can’t wait. This was so much fun.

Pamela Bardhi
Oh, my goodness. Now you’ve got to let everyone know where to find you and your awesomeness.

Natalie Elisha G.
Oh my god, just google me. My friends Google me, LinkedIn, me, whatever. I am happy always to connect. I want to help you in any way possible for the listeners. I mean, seriously, if I can speak to you, and in some way tell you that you can do it. And it’s coming from someone else besides your family because that was nothing in it for me. Let’s do that. Let’s let people live their best and most amazing life. That’s what we’re here for.

Pamela Bardhi
Amen. Sister. I love that. I love that so so much. I want to thank you so much for being here. Today. You are a total rock star. And I’m just so grateful.

Natalie Elisha G.
Thank you so much for having me.

Tune in to the episode to hear the rest of my incredible interview with the amazing Natalie Elisha G.