Joe Lau

Joe is a serial entrepreneur. He has founded six companies and sold three of them resulting in multiple seven-figure profits. As a successful entrepreneur, speaker, and quality of life coach, Joe inspires and challenges people to connect with who they truly are so that they can have meaningful relationships and live a healthier and higher-quality lifestyle. Joe’s approach simplifies the process of achieving a harmonic life by focusing on the things that truly matter.

He teaches his clients to practice gratitude and appreciation to better all areas of their life from fitness to family to finances. His methods help his clients become the best version of themselves and allow them to play more, live more, and make more.

Get CLARITY to understand yourself and how you function best, WISDOM to operate in your strengths, and FREEDOM to delegate tasks that aren’t in your zone of genius. Take this quiz now: www.moretimetospend.com/underdog

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Joe Lau Remarkable Journey of Success & Purpose of Enhancing Quality of Life

Pamela Bardhi
Hello, everyone, and welcome to another episode of underdog. Today I have an awesome, awesome guest here with us. Joe, how are you?

Joe Lau
I’m doing great. Pamela, thank you for having me.

Pamela Bardhi
Oh, thank you so much for being here. For those of you who don’t know, Joe is an absolute rock star. He is a serial entrepreneur and has launched several businesses, multiple seven figures just like amazing. And so Joe, we really appreciate you having and being here with us today. Seriously, it’s such an honor and with all your magic, my question to you and this is a pretty loaded question. But I’ll ask. I don’t know. You’re ready. My question is. What inspired you on your path to where you are today?

Joe Lau
It is a loaded question and this is a documentary, right? We have about two days for this. Oh my goodness, what inspired me on my path is my upbringing. I grew up in Hong Kong. And my parents got divorced when I was really little when I was really young. So I know my father loves me. But just like any other father, not just a traditional Asian father, they work hard. That’s how they know to provide love is by providing things and education and stuff. So we can live better to serve as my father after my mom loved my father and worked just as hard as before. And the problem is, I never got a sim that just never seemed right. At that point, I realized that, well, I don’t know what I want to be when I grow up.

I cannot even pronounce the word entrepreneur, because it’s in Chinese or in English. So I have no idea what that means, I just know that I want to do something in the future. When I grow up that I can make a lot of money and have a lot of time. And we all know how to become entrepreneurs, right? It’s kind of like a 24 seven journey. So that’s kind of like embedded to me that I wanted something with true freedom. But to this, I didn’t really think I would become an entrepreneur because of my culture. We realize that we’ve been taught that only the one that’s privileged. Or the Hutus or the super gifted, talented are allowed to own their own business.

So in my case, the chance of being an entrepreneur kind of fell into my lap. Right around my senior year, when I was studying for a computer engineering degree. At that time, my buddy Charles just kind of started his own thing to design a POS system for restaurants. And so I’m Wow, this is actually kind of cool and he came to me as I do want to partner with him. I’m like, What am I supposed to do? As well, you do everything except for programming, I was like. That’s awesome, because I suck at it, right, so if I don’t have to do programming. Which is my major, then I’m good to go, so I’m like, okay, just go sell it. So that’s kind of like how I started my entrepreneurial journey. And the opportunity kind of fell into my lap.

But to move forward to sorry, with some making money really fast. And then he was great, but we quickly fail. Because I have no idea how to manage a business. He had no idea what we’re doing. So it’s two people that have no idea what this is about. We have some financial success, but I have no idea what’s going on, so the partnership quickly fell apart. And then at that moment, what I have left Pamela is a reality that I suck at business. So unlike other entrepreneurs that have to have the illusion in their head that if someday I launch a business, I’ll be amazing. I cannot get that dream taken away from me. Because I did launch a business by default and we failed. And I suck at it. That’s how it all started.

Pamela Bardhi
Oh my god. Well, you mentioned really important things. But you know, what I really loved about your story is like. You went ahead and did it anyway, you didn’t know what you’re doing. Then that’s okay, you just took the first step and you’re like, Okay, well, let’s try it out, which I think is awesome. And from those failures, I like to call them lessons. So like, what was your biggest lesson that you learned in that first business?

Joe Lau
The biggest lesson I learned is that if you want to be successful, not just be entrepreneurial in life in general. I took on the responsibility that I caused this, not that my partner caused all the environmental causes. What I mean by that is at that point is that I realized that I was One that was not educated. I was one that was not experienced. So what can I do to better myself, so I can come up better instead of just complaining, oh my god. My business failed, you know, my Parkway and things like that.

So the biggest lessons I learned as an entrepreneur, I only win or I learn, I don’t fail, the business idea may fail, it happens. But it’s not a big deal, because like you mentioned before, failing is a lesson to learn. So it’s nothing like winning or losing as most people do. I think the biggest takeaway for me as a human being not just a business. If we keep on going, keep on being curious humans learning from what we did before. And learn from it as entrepreneur, you either win or you learn and your big success is going to come and just a matter of time.

Pamela Bardhi
Amen to that. And like, for you, how did you get back into that business? Did you pivot back in?

Joe Lau
Just completely shut down. That particular one and which was not very smart to do that? Now, looking back, it could have been in so many different ways. Right. And but I didn’t know all those, like techniques to do are just gone at that point.

Pamela Bardhi
Gotcha. How did you handle it, because I know that there’s a lot of entrepreneurs listening? That maybe it could be dealing with a partner or partners. What would be your biggest advice based on what you learned in that first experience of how to deal with partners and how to manage conflict when things aren’t going so?

Joe Lau
Also, the biggest lesson to learn is kind of like piggybacking on the first question, right, is look within. What could you have done that would avoid or soften the situation? In my case, one of the reasons that my buddy wanted to quit this because he wanted stability in life. He went on to get a really, you know, good-paying engineering job. So at that point, I failed to see that his need, his motivation, was stability. Now, knowing that I could have bought him out, I could have, you know. Get advanced from the project we got and guess and pay him a salary. Then I’d be the sole owner even better, more money for me, right. But at that point, at the moment, I was young, I was immature, I was inexperienced.

And I externalize, I blame him for whoa, wait a minute. Why don’t you see what I see the potential and quick on us? So the lesson they learn is that when the Punisher falls apart. The first step to do is look in the mirror. What could I have done to avoid it and fix it? And the second thing is communication. If I would just ask honestly like, Hey, what’s going on? What is on your mind? Why did you quit? Instead of you know, like, why did you quit doing what beaver? Yeah, he may tell me that. You know, I want income down, what? Oh, you want income? Okay, let me go figure it out. So that’s the biggest lesson I learned, look within and be honest. Have honest communication on what the person needs and one.

Pamela Bardhi
I love that so much. And then from there, how did you pivot and start your own journey into the entrepreneurial realm after that first business?

Joe Lau
Alright, chapter two. So that really was one of the lowest points of my life. At that point I graduated college, I thought I was a decent grey and had decent experience. No one hired me to fail my business right out of the gate. So at that point, I was able to just go back to the only thing I know how to make money, which was a restaurant working as a waiter. That’s how I did full college support myself and was so stressed at that point. And then you know how restaurant life is during crazy hours right? Long story short, I get this really bad stomach ulcer. Why when in the ICU unit almost died at age 26. Like a true story, I had to get a blood transfusion just to get better.

And the moment I feel the blood coming into my body, that no I’m not going to die that night at the ICU unit. The next thing that came to my head was how am I going to pay this medical bill? Like literally pen? That’s exactly what I thought and I just started crying. Now remember holding my mom’s hair. I was like, how am I gonna pay for this? And she told me we’re gonna figure it out. But in the end, I forget all right. So he was so stressed and then the next day. I got out of the hospital and my boss from the Chinese restaurant called me to say when can you come back to work without hesitation. So with the experience, I thought to myself, wow, I guess it’s just how everybody does it right.

I went back to the restaurant that day. Around three, four o’clock is when we take a break until I have tears in my eyes. Because I sounded like I don’t know, it’s called self-pity. Or like realization or an epiphany moment, whatever that you call it. I look at myself when I came all the way from Hong Kong to this country to have a better life, I have a five-figure debt on my education. And I failed my business and now I have a huge medical bill. Is my life just meant to be a waiter? Let me see nothing wrong with that. But I feel like a man for more than one realizes that it cannot be. So one thing led to another. My wife and girlfriend will be together for 20 years. She told me it is programmed to sell stuff on the internet.

This is 2003. When you tell people you sell stuff on the internet, they think you have a hobby. Get a job, get alive. I’m like, Yeah, whatever. But in the end, it was 70 bucks. And I was like, Okay, I guess I can afford that program. So but the program from this infomercial NSR One week later, I finished studying it. And then they said, Oh, I want to sell stuff on the internet, you need a website and we can sell it to you for $6,000. I was like $6,000, I don’t even have $6,000 credit on my credit card. Not doable. So I quickly get my money back.

And then at that moment, I thought to myself, if someone would have put up that much effort. Put up an infomercial to sell someone like a borderline scam Ico scam. It turns out later on that the FTC shut down the company, it was a scam, It was crazy. What I still think is that if someone put up that much effort that we’ll do got to be huge. That’s when I started digging into digital marketing back in the day called online marketing. So one thing led to another to learn how to, you know, market things online. And that’s when I started my first business selling self-defense products like stun guns and tasers and that’s my first successful business.

Pamela Bardhi
Wow. What inspired you to sell those specifically?

Joe Lau
When he wants to never end this call, this is another story. But I’m making it really quick. I’m Chinese, of course, I know martial law, of course, we obviously. It is true. Everybody says filehippo from Hong Kong. Okay. So the master of us, so I was reading some books, they’re like, Oh. You should sell something that you’re passionate about, so at that point, 2003 I thought, Oh, I will sell Chinese martial arts DVDs. Then when I googled it, I found a small company called Amazon.

I was like, oh, maybe I shouldn’t compete with Amazon, even though they were really small back then. But still, they pay you know, so what else can I sell? So I was like, okay, maybe I should sell something related to self-defense, so for some research. Digging into this and finding out okay, stun guns, stun guns, and tasers were a good market. Cuz where can you buy those things offline? If you cannot buy things offline, it has to be sold online. So that’s how I went through it. It is just based on supply and demand and some personal changes.

Pamela Bardhi
That’s hilarious. So how did the sales go with that?

Joe Lau
He was amazing, It really was, you know, because at that point, once I realized that no one can buy stuff online offline. And we were able to do our digital marketing really well online, we rank on all the search engines. We do pay and other stuff, we dominated the search page right for the term second and taser. Then they just started flopping and it was amazing. It was like a dream come true. But you’re sitting at home, literally in your shorts. And sometimes those shirts depend on the weather and you just keep money, just keep the King coming. It was back in the day, It was good, It was good.

Pamela Bardhi
I’m sure you ended upscaling that one and then how did you pivot on to the next one? So you’re talking about the scaling because you’re like oh it’s tutu. And then it’s like it’s kind of a new concept to him like online stores at that time. So it would be interesting to know how you sort of frame that to scale it and then how do you jump into the next one?

Joe Lau
Yeah, so at that time after our first year, we were already doing well. Over six figures in profit right, so for guy that you know nothing about business know nothing about life in general. I felt pretty good at that point, I wanted to learn how to manage a business and hire high people. Because I was a solopreneur, I have no idea how to manage anything, not even myself So I’m like okay, should I go get an MBA, because it’s a natural route right you go get more education. And learn management is MBA so look into Wow, this is expensive, you know. This is all the profit that we have for the whole year I mean, you know paying like.

I don’t know, like, almost six figures, like two and a half years of not working, I literally call the school, I don’t want to name, I call wanted a school. The administration office I say can I do this part-time? Like how involved is there like Oh, you’re supposed to do it like two and a half years full-time commitment. We have a project where you have to do internal law. Oh, that sounds too much right. So one thing leads to another. I stumble upon a franchise opportunity. All right, I don’t want to bore you with another crazy story. We’ll be here five more days, so I looked into the franchise business.

I was like whoa, wait a minute franchise was a better way to learn. How to scale a system and process and you know, do business and I was like, Okay. Let me buy a franchise business. Not to mention that franchise business is a tax preparation franchise. So what sold me on the idea is that I never took a vacation my whole day my whole life, so they told me. Wow, you’re in a text franchise. You don’t have to work the entire summer as a wow, that’s also right. What’s a better way to make money, learn how to you know scale a business and not work then tie someone so I’m in. So I bought a franchise business to learn how to scale. That’s my third business.

Pamela Bardhi
What realm was that business in?

Joe Lau
Like tax preparation? Also, like exploration, like right now will be a busy season for tax preparation?

Pamela Bardhi
Did you buy it in your city?

Joe Lau
We bought one location and we ended up having three. So we were bought one location to start with, we did our one year where we did one season with a business. And it was, it was quite a personal journey because there was a lot to learn. But fortunately, with guidance from the company and a lot of hardware, we were able to four times our investment. And I left that company because I just didn’t share the value on how to operate and the target audience.

So the biggest lesson I learned from that experience is that life is a little bit more than just money, that you have this. And that I realize that value is, at least for Personally. I value integrity a little bit slightly higher than wealth. Because of the business, it just doesn’t align with my personal values. So I decided to quit. And that’s the lessons I learned from that.

Pamela Bardhi
That’s incredible. And then the business that you had before that with the online tasers and the stun guns. Did you end up selling that before you jumped into the tax prep?

Joe Lau
Oh, no, no, it was crazy. I said, I still have that. Right. So I still have to run both businesses at the same time. That’s when I learned to try not to do that next time. Because it’s so hard. And that but that’s also when I learned what I’m capable of when you get when you are being pushed hard, you know. So I was running my self-defense products business and I wanted that franchise business for the season. That’s when I learned how to scale. And after that, I use everything I learned from the how-to scale and scale my own self-defense product business.

Pamela Bardhi
So you’re happy that you didn’t go for an MBA, but you invested in the franchise instead? That’s so awesome. Well, because that’s like the type of things that you don’t learn in school, right? You learn a lot of theory, you learn a lot of things. But I don’t think that there’s any experience other than going out there. And like learning and owning a business. I think that’s the biggest teacher you could ever possibly have.

Joe Lau
Absolutely. And you know how I feel right? I mean, long story short, people ask me. How do you learn how to put your money on a line and your loan? That’s it? I mean, is it to put your own money on the line?

What Joe Wanted To Be When He Grew Up

Pamela Bardhi
Absolutely. I 100% agree with that. Now I have a question for you. Personally, what did you want to be when you grew up? Joe?

Joe Lau
I love that question. Thank you for the chance to say that. Without telling another story. I like to talk a lot. So my grandma told me that you’d like to talk a lot. And you’d like to argue you should be a lawyer, so I said, Oh, sure. Wow. If you can just talk and argue with people all day long and when the lawyer. I’d be a lawyer until I hit in Hong Kong called secondary school and here maybe around like Middle School and you realize that one more year, kind of like a student.

And I wasn’t that Jim quickly, like, Nah, I don’t think lawyers around than I wanted to be a DJ. Like a radio DJ, like a disc jockey. Because I love music, right? I love music. I love to sing, I love to talk to people, I was like, wow. If I can listen to radio if I can listen to music all day and talk to people individually. And just kind of like whatever and talk about stuff and make a living. That will be amazing. So my second biggest dream is to be a DJ.

Pamela Bardhi
Oh, my God, have you done any DJing at all, have you? Have you sampled a little bit and played with it a little bit?

Joe Lau
No, unfortunately not. Because growing up in Hong Kong, if you do stuff like that you’re cancer with its own year.

Pamela Bardhi
But I was in college. College and it wasn’t on purpose. I just couldn’t stand the music that was being played on campus. So I bought my own small little set. And I just started going. You can still do it.

Joe Lau
Oh, man. Yeah, I’ve made it. That’s why I think about it like if I have on my podcast, this is new. This is like a modified version of that. Right?

Pamela Bardhi
And a question for you too, what was your biggest inspiration growing up? I know, you mentioned your dad and then he was working. It’s up. But was there another person? Or is there another mantra that you had that kind of like, you know, as you’re growing up, like you kind of live by?

Joe Lau
Yeah, the truth is, I didn’t really have any idol because my truth is, I wasn’t even a reader. Right? I was a past student, not a reader. And I’m pretty lazy and pretty, I mean, Mr. was mean. So I wasn’t very inspired by a lot of things. But there’s one thing that I truly believe ever since that is, I don’t know how to call it exactly. It’s kind of like how you Gotta let you have one of the three.

That has always been my thing. Like I realized that you know, there’s really no, there’s no right or wrong to the extreme. It’s only the consequences. If you can handle the consequence, then you know, that’s you, who is who to judge like, it’s right or wrong or black or white. So yeah, so ever since early on in my job. I realized that  I should only treat people how I want to be treated.

Pamela Bardhi
Right. I love that, I love that Joe. And then, you know, throughout your businesses as you were transitioning. Because you’ve had quite a trajectory throughout your businesses. How many businesses have you had no,

Joe Lau
Altogether? Phenomenal seven? No, I see my seven-fail bomb on eighth right now. This is what I do right now. So as a quality of life coach, that’s what I’m doing.

Pamela Bardhi
God. Yes. So walk me through the rest of the businesses. I think we pause that number three.

Joe Lau
So number three was the tax preparation. Number four, was a startup like that was my son exposed to a startup like software, that would be really cool. At that point, I like to get different haircuts. I have a lot more hair back in the days, so don’t let this fool you. So I would get like, really, really different haircuts, just I just love it, so I thought, well. Maybe if there’s a website to connect stylists with a client, this is back in the day. It’s back in like 2009. Right? If I can connect just directly from the client to the stylist. Because before the stylist, right, you know, for the salon. Then we have that direct creation, query all the tools to help the stylists to market our own business.

They’ll be amazing, so I call it the hair hero, you know. Spent a lot of money that I made to hire some software and software engineers to build. I think we dragged it off about two years. And it fail, I started it and it’s because I wasn’t hungry enough, I was just chilling. Because I was working really little hours, so my life was really good at that point in my own standard. So I wasn’t hungry enough to have another success or work hard and focus on it. And that allowed my lessons, although I have money to spend on that time, it wasn’t enough, it’s just his lack of focus. So that quickly fail, so that was number four and number five, another startup idea. Which is a real estate startup that I saw the whole problem with.

I like to rent is purchase just for you know, just personal preference. And I realize that it’s hard to find a good place to live, especially in C like Miami. So what if there’s an app out there that will connect the landlord and the tenant directly. Without anything else, so this time, I was smarter, I learned to pitch to other people using someone else’s money. And I did sound like oh, this is not just my money, this time. It’s someone else’s money, so it must be good, and then that person that my partner says, Okay. I’ll only invest in this if you get into some kind of accelerator. Or incubator, that’s kind of a good idea. It’s a challenge, so my idea has to be somewhat validated by someone smarter than me.

When I did it, we were able to pitch to this local incubator group. I convinced my buddy to put in the money, so now I just put up the idea in the world. So it’s like this is the first like a startup. We even went on to one of the spots where we get funded and grant money, so this one, I put up zero money, so this is amazing. It feels like a startup business. This is the real deal, so we did that, while still running my self-defense product. At that point, I have employees, so I have some time to do this. So we were able to chunk our MVP on, we were able to like pitch after the MVP in the market, get validation with a pitch and raise money.

We would find an investor to truly invest in us a little bit bigger and have a much better seven-figure valuation. Then at that point, my daughter, my second daughter was about to be born in about four or five weeks. And then the investor told me and my coach told me that, okay. After we invest in this, the next thing for you to do as a CEO is to continue to raise more money to scale now. Now you have to be MVP, you need a team, what do you mean by that? So you need to travel a little bit more, so to see other people and that’s what you’re supposed to do. And I’ll Oh, I have no idea what I thought, right in my little world.

I thought, Oh, you have the MVP, your money. You hire people, you just sit and manage anything that will go to like trillions, right? But now it turns out that the CEO has to travel. At least that’s what my experience is. That’s what I told myself. So I realized that, okay, my daughter is about to be born, I don’t want to travel. And then I know you’re about to ask me. The next question was about my sixth business. At the very same time, while I was working in this business, I had a couple interns. I have one of my interns start his new business for me. Wow. It’s just some time.

So she started his business for me, we create a baby product. Which gives our dad rights. I want to solve my own problems, I want to create a business that I can relate to. That’s my sixth business, so we sell baby products. And then she single-handedly launched a product for us and then we were doing five figures really fast. So within a year, this business is making money already, which is kind of automated already. And now I have real estate business requirements. I was like, ah, I don’t know, man, so, at that point, I had to say no, to the real estate business and completely shut it down and focus on my baby business. That was my sixth business.

Pamela Bardhi
Wow. Oh, my goodness on the baby business. That’s amazing. I love how every business tries to solve their own problems, which is so cool. Do you still have the baby business today? No, I sold that a few years ago. That’s awesome. So now we’re at number seven.

Joe Lau
Number seven, fail.

Pamela Bardhi
Okay.

Joe Lau
Number eight is doing good.

Pamela Bardhi
So throughout your amazing companies, what were some of the biggest lessons that you learned sort of, in total, throughout all of them?

Joe Lau
The biggest lesson I learned the first thing is to learn. Look at an entrepreneur as a winner, learn how business fails, it’s okay. As an entrepreneur, if you look at yourself as a winner. You will get to that one that will give you a meaningful win. So that’s lesson number one. The second lesson is entrepreneurship is nothing but a race between. Do you have a meaningful win first? Or is your ping tolerance running now. When your ping currents run out, that’s when you look for safety, which is a job. But if you have a meaning, every time when you have a meaningful win, in this case, probably make money. Some of that comes to fruition, make money, or may impact. You reset your pain tolerance.

Now, you know, okay, I have higher pain tolerance right now. Maybe my new pain tolerance is like six months a year. Or X amount of dollar I’m willing to invest before I see any income or return on investment. So the key to entrepreneurship is to how do you perceive yourself constantly. Have that win before your pain tolerance now, which is a balance between your belief system and your mindset? What will it be like, so take baby steps and make progress versus perfection? So that’s lesson number two, progress versus perfection, increase small win daily. If not hourly, if you can afford it, so that’s something you can control. That’s lesson number two. Lesson number three, which I will not say is the biggest lesson.

Lesson three can tie everything together. I realize that as an entrepreneur, I know I keep saying entrepreneur, not just business in general. Because my personal excitement is that I love this entrepreneur lifestyle, I would not pay for anything else, right? The business is just one part of it. So as an entrepreneur, you are the strongest as your weakest link. Period, you’re the strongest as your weakest link, meaning what I mean by that is, your business is doing really well. And your personal relationships suffer. There’s no way you can give 100% of the business, you might think you are but you are not. Because the easiest example is when you’re sick, we have all been sick before. When you are sick, physically sick, can you focus, you came to think straight?

Can you grind it out 12 hours, you can. That’s what I mean by you’re the strongest or weakest link. But that holistic approach goes further than just healthy. All your health goes all the way to your belief, to your mental fitness, to your relationship. To the relationship to yourself, your health, your energy level, your fate, all those are tied together. Which has led to business success, if that’s what you want to focus on. So my suggestion is take a holistic approach in your life and look at where your weakest area is and try to plug that hole. Because otherwise, you’re not maximizing your full potential in any area or as a person in general.

Pamela Bardhi
Amen to that and any specific advice for entrepreneurs, that you would give them on what you wish you knew.

Joe Lau
I wish I knew how to work with someone that I have done what you want to create a lot sooner. Because success, this shortcut. And the shortcut is not about doing less. It’s about doing more of the right thing by learning from the people that have already lived. And create and walk the path that you have. So I wish I would start working with a coach or mentor a lot sooner than, I would have as a much easier or straighter path, so to speak.

Pamela Bardhi
I love that and that’s kind of what you created now and number eight, right?

Joe Lau
Yeah, my number eight is a coaching business that I call myself a quality Life Coach. My primary focus is to help busy entrepreneur, chatter figure out what is truly matter not only in the business also in their life. So you can focus on that and live this harmonic lifestyle that I call, play more, live more, make more.

Pamela Bardhi
I love that and basically, so who’s like your avatar. Your number one like, like the person that like entrepreneurs like? I would imagine?

Joe Lau
Yeah, absolutely. My number one avatar is the six-figure entrepreneur. Because I realized that a six-figure entrepreneur is the one that they have a foundation on what they can do and what the business model is. And the reason the six-figure entrepreneurs, a six-figure a lot of time is not because they lack marketing. I will say this, maybe my marketing guru is gonna hate me on that. But I will say, a lot of time that stuff a six-figure and not to the next level. Has nothing to do with marketing has everything to do with how they run the business.

And what they focus on the one thing that is going to lead them to the next level is usually or a lot in the head. But the problem is this is so close to the business that they see abstract things and they cannot see the big picture. Therefore, they got lost along the way and forgot what they want to be known for. What the business set up to do, so my job is to help them with a holistic approach to some time to reset in order for their growth. So that’s what I do.

Pamela Bardhi
That’s amazing. Joe, that’s amazing. And I have to ask you this, this is one of my favorite questions. What would your older self tell your younger self, based on what you know now?

Joe Lau
Start sooner, just jump right in and learn the lessons. And don’t worry about what others think and just know who you are. Spend more time learning who you are, have a stronger belief system. Then spending time learning the tactic, because the tactic you can outsource easily, right? The mindset, only you I mean, not only you, but only you can change it, the other can inspire you and guide you. But spend a lot of time working on your mind and yourself versus learning just haptics.

Pamela Bardhi
That’s amazing. And Joe, you mentioned your business number eight a little bit and that’s sort of what you’re working on now. Because you’ve been working on some amazing things. Amazing, amazing things. So tell us what are you up to in the world now in your coaching business?

Joe Lau
Yeah, yeah, one of the things that I’m always excited about is Aristotle. One of the greatest philosophers said, right, knowing yourself is the beginning of all wisdom. So you know, Pamela, as an entrepreneur, your business is a reflection of your beliefs and your value. And it has a real impact on how your business runs and grows. So one of the best-kept secrets of a successful entrepreneur is the owner themselves. They know the value very well. What I have created is I have this personality assessment. This assessment is a value-based assessment that only takes 90 seconds to complete. And This powerful assessment is responsible to help some of my students get back hours per day.

Not only that, but it also helps others to identify and delegate up to 90% of their work. They can completely free themselves up to live and focus on the things that truly matter. So it’s a special gift to your audience for underdog podcast. What I like to do is offer your audience opportunity, this assessment for free, I want to take 92nd. And not only that idea of the assessment, I will personally give you three custom tips. So you can implement right away how to skyrocket your productivity. How to get things done faster and stress-free and 100%. Customize and if you’re interested in only this go on to the website at moretimetospend.com/ underdog and take the assessment and get the three tips today.

Pamela Bardhi
You’re amazing, Joe. So everyone heard that correctly? 90 seconds, so you can get 90% of your life back. Why would you not do it? Right, why would you not do it? That’s incredible, that’s incredible. Joe, thank you so much for offering that to our listeners because they’re all incredible. They’re all amazing and they’re all on different journeys. So I know that you will add value to them without question and I’m gonna take it also myself. Because I’m always learning every day and I’m just so so grateful for you. And now Joe, where can everybody find you and your awesomeness?

Joe Lau
Follow me on Facebook on the real Joe Lau on Facebook.

Pamela Bardhi
You are amazing. Joe, thank you so much for being here today and offering your insight and wisdom. I can’t wait to see how your coaching business just thrives and continues to change lives around the globe. So thank you so much for doing what you do and for being here today, my friend.

Tune in to the episode to hear the rest of my incredible interview with the amazing Joe Lau.